The Sky Was Black On The Moon?

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posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 01:59 PM
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reply to post by wmd_2008
 


Yeah look i dont know about the moon landing's i dont know anymore, i was just trying to post a theory. It is plausible in the fact of the stars and visibility.
If they first assumed stars would not be visible, and went with that story and told the Ap 11 to say that, then they could not change the story later once they discovered stars are visible. It would show Ap11 was a lie.

As i said i did believe it was not faked, but looking into this more has been swaying me. How do you explain Blackbird and Mig 25 pilots being able to see stars in daytime flights at high altitude?

I am not specualting i have quoted the articles and interviews and also provided links. They stated they could see stars during daytime flights at very high altitude due to thin atmosphere etc.

I also love the fact that the jets/ planes burn less fuel than on idle at the ground at those altitudes. How good is that for fuel efficientcy. Now i know the Jetson's secrets lol



Also why in the post landing interview did they have monitors in front of them like script screens?

[edit on 21-4-2010 by Havick007]




posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 02:00 PM
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reply to post by Truth1000
 


Sorry 1969, that's right. I was born in 85 so forgive my ignorance there.
I was rushing the reply...



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 02:01 PM
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reply to post by Havick007
 


The fact that Lunar rock samples are dated as old as they are is CONSISTENT with the formation theory OF the Moon!!!

AND, the Moon is like a storehouse, compared to the Earth. Think of it is as a sort of 'museum'.

On Earth, the crust (that's where we find 'rocks') is constantly being recycled.

The Moon, by comparison, hasn't changed much, in the four billion years or so, after its formation.

Really, this is so basic, it is hardly worth explaining to people who care not to comprehend....



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 02:02 PM
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I guess because we're acting on the statements of the guys who said they couldnt see the stars? Now your telling us that this isnt true, that they never said this at all?

So...its POSSIBLE to take said pics on the moon dependant on exposure times and film speed?

Its POSSIBLE theres some confusion as to whether the guys could see them or not, I say that because most people are well aware of the fact that you cant see much if its too bright beforehand, or youv just been dazzled etc?



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 02:04 PM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 


Well it's a well known scientific fact. So who is right you or the 100's of scientist's?



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 02:08 PM
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You know.....this is just turning into a my gods bigger than your god sketch, problem is Im an agnostic. Time for a malt, Frankie Miller and a pat at my dog!

Peace!



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 02:09 PM
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reply to post by Tie No Bows!
 


Well yes Apollo astronauts have said they couldnt see stars in daytime on the surface. It's in the post landing press conference.

I am going on what high altitude pilots have saif in interviews as i posted above(couple pages back) and another opst in a Military Mig 25 forum from comments made by an ex mig 25 pilot - again below: The first batch of pilots to be trained were Wing Commander A.J.Singh, Squadron Leaders D. Lazarus, S.L.Sud, J.S. Grewal, besides Flight Lieutenants R.E.Ketkar and Lt B.S.Khalsa.

"When you fly at those altitudes there's a sudden change in environment. Now, you see the sky as blue, when you go to those heights the sky is dark. You can see the stars during the day-light, you can see the curvature of the earth. Then you suddenly feel you don't belong to this earth, you don't want to come down to land. You want to stay there. There's a distinct feeling of aloofness that you don't belong to this earth," said Air Vice Marshal J.S.Grewal (Retd), one of the pilots of the pioneering batch, which trained in the then Soviet Union.

Master Warrant Officer (MWO) Desraj, the technical maintenance person who received training in the USSR and has served with the aircraft ever since said that he had no words to express his feelings. He was emotional on account of the decommissioning as he had seen the aircraft right from the beginning and had served in it.

Six of the eight MiG25s will be flown to the National Defence Academy, the Air Force Academy, AFS Kalaikunda, AFS Hindan, AFS Palam and AFS Jodhpur to be installed and preserved as heritage pieces to inspire future officers during training. Two were lost in accidents.


the other was from an officer in the USAF that flew Blackbirds and is quite credible and not related to UFO / Conspiracy discussion. Did you see that post as well, if not i will repost.

so i am going off that. If they could see stars in daytime flights at altitudes of 85,000ft then i dont see why astronauts in space cannot.



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 02:10 PM
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reply to post by Tie No Bows!
 


No no nothing to do with religion here my friend



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 02:17 PM
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reply to post by Havick007
 



Well yes Apollo astronauts have said they couldnt see stars in daytime on the surface. It's in the post landing press conference.



What part of reality is so difficult to comprehend?

Astronauts, while EVA on the Lunar surface, were in bright sunlight. The Human eye iris closes down, much as a camera lens does, in bright lighting conditions.

Man! This is basic Human biology!

Here is yet another real-world every-day example that people here on Earth can relate to....

Choose to go to the cinema, and choose a matinee.

WALK into the theatre directly after being outside, in the bright daylight.

CHOOSE the time, after the house lights have gone down....good luck!

[edit on 21 April 2010 by weedwhacker]



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 02:48 PM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 


ok yes but we are limited due to atmospheric conditions yes? So what then about the Pilot's that saw stars? what? how do you respond to that?

I wasnt wanting to touch this topic as i had limited knowledge but when i started to look into it i found those articles. If the pilot's could see stars in daylight at high altitude with a thinner atmosphere then how do you explain that?

Please how?



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 03:06 PM
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FYI: For anyone interesting fantastic night for viewing Jupiter!! I was just outside with my Celestron and SR4 lense, fantastic, could see Jupiter's moons and all. In the states if it's the same views, tonight i gonna be cracker for star gazers


Although it's almost dawn here now, so i missed alot of viewing time.

[edit on 21-4-2010 by Havick007]

[edit on 21-4-2010 by Havick007]



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 03:13 PM
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reply to post by Havick007
 


Re blackbird pilots if they are looking at the black sky there eyes would adjust to that light level so they would probably see stars.

The Astronauts are looking at the very bright surface of the Moon so if they take a quick look up they would not see stars BUT if they let their eyes adjust for a few second they would.

Try it for yourself at night go into a room stare at the light turn it off and see how long it takes your eyes to adjust that you can make out objects in the room.

A little common sense and being aware of what actually happens around you goes a long way.



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 03:18 PM
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reply to post by wmd_2008
 




Re blackbird pilots if they are looking at the black sky there eyes would adjust to that light level so they would probably see stars.


The earth is bright. So, the difference is....?



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 03:19 PM
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reply to post by wmd_2008
 


ok fair enough, do you think they had time to let there eyes adjust? They had time to do plenty of other things, golf for example. If you were on the Moon wouldn't you wanna see what the stars look like from there, it's a once in a lifetime opportunity yeah?

Also dont forget the lunar surface isnt white, it's not totally reflective, it's grey, less light reflects of grey. If light reflection was such a big issue many of the photo's from the surface would have been way too bright for exposure wouldnt they?

The Lunar sky is black as well. As i said they didnt 5 minutes to look at the stars from th moon?

[edit on 21-4-2010 by Havick007]



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 03:25 PM
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Originally posted by Deaf Alien
reply to post by wmd_2008
 




Re blackbird pilots if they are looking at the black sky there eyes would adjust to that light level so they would probably see stars.


The earth is bright. So, the difference is....?


IF THEY ARE LOOKING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! AT THE DARK SKY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! THERE EYES WILL ADJUST TO THAT LIGHT LEVEL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! cant make it any clearer sorry!!!!!



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 03:28 PM
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reply to post by wmd_2008
 


Right. So the astronauts on the moon couldn't look up and wait for the eyes to adjust? They could have used their arms to block out the glare from the moon surface.



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 03:33 PM
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reply to post by Havick007
 


So you think not a lot of light reflects of the MOON well look at these examples.
The light source on the Moon is the sun pictures on moon are similar to daylight shots on earth HOW do you think we can see the Moon in daylight if it did not reflect light well.

A link to a good site for Astrophotography

Look how short exposure times are.

Here is a link scroll down to the big dipper picture

home.flash.net...


Exposure details F5.6 at 20 seconds (+-) using Kodak Max 800 print film


Look at this link The Moon

www.annedarlingphotography.com...

Scroll down to full Moon pic

Exposure 1/400 sec at f/5.6, ISO 200

The moon pic was on iso 200 the stars iso 800 which is 4x more sensetive if the moon pic was taken using iso 800 the exposure would have been 1/1600th of a second

NOW DO YOU GUYS UNDERSTAND WHY NO STARS IN THE MOON PICTURES.



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 03:37 PM
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Originally posted by Deaf Alien
reply to post by wmd_2008
 


Right. So the astronauts on the moon couldn't look up and wait for the eyes to adjust? They could have used their arms to block out the glare from the moon surface.


Why would they? I think they just looked up, did not see stars because of the glare, and then continued to explore the interesting part - the Moon. It could take a few minutes for their eyes to adjust, too long to bother much.



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 03:38 PM
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reply to post by Maslo
 




too long to bother much.


But they had time to play golf?



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 03:45 PM
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Originally posted by Deaf Alien
reply to post by Maslo
 




too long to bother much.


But they had time to play golf?


They didn't exactly play 18 holes did they , they would have seen the same stars
only with no twinkle no great loss I would think.




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