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RIAA Wants Gov. to Delete Your Illegal Downloads

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posted on Apr, 19 2010 @ 06:18 AM
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Nice to see some of you have made the effort to write your own protection soxware to try and stop big bro in his tracks.

i made a proxy server just for fun realy and test it on my free email account mail.com and i was amazed to see just how many HTTP requests were not from the mail provider so i looked a bit deeper and it turned out that just from the login page, 11-12 calls were being made to the likes of double click, rover.ebay.com and such like so i started to block these addresses only to find the next time i pressed refresh another batch of spyscrips were used point to other addresses and then private IP addresses started to appear.

Since the proxy server caches all the file it was easy to monitor just how many external site were embeded within this one login page and the total comes to over 100 !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Your welcome not to take my word for this but you can always download fiddler and see for yourself.

During the login process mail.com directs you to a HTTPS/SSL page and then back to a HTTP page on port 80 but during the few seconds needed to verify your name and passwords the proxy server goes mad as requests are sent out all over the place including AOL.

This has nothing to do with advert tracking and everything to do with eBay and it's google partner monitoring you every time you log into to your private email account because they are after the referer string shown as the URL in the browser for you email account and nine times out of ten that includes a unique mail ID for that account so ebay knows your logging in long after you have deleted your ebay cookies and history.

what this means is if you ever logged into your email account in the past and happen to have a ebay cookie on your machine, they have you.

it gets worse.......

eBay also use etags with images that are unique to the user so cookies or not they are still watching you and thats without flash cookies and beacons and if you look you will find many ebay members are having accounts restricted due to what ebay claims is unusual activity on the account and now you know why.

My theory is these guys are well ahead of us and trying to block them all is somply not possible so we need to corrupt their data and to have software that clicks every double click link it sees and then and then only will they get the message and stop all this big bro spying.

The proxy server i developed can fake coookies, etags, referer , proxy_For, via , user_agent and a few more and i could put a version on-line so that loads of us all end up sharing the same cookies which would realy pi$$ big bro off and what would happen if a single double click link got 1000 clicks an hour from 1000's unique IP addresses and what if Rover.Ebay.Com was given more meat then it could eat.

eTags were the best thing since sliced bread for the internet but eBay and Co soon put paid to that.




posted on Apr, 19 2010 @ 06:19 AM
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Originally posted by MR BOB


Linux has plenty of holes too. If someone wanted they could create great spyware for linux. the only reason people dont often do it is because its too small a target compared to windows users.


Very true, it's open source nature lends itself to being in many ways more easily infiltrated than Microshaft products, because you can easily "see" the code being used.



posted on Apr, 19 2010 @ 06:20 AM
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reply to post by belial259
 


not necessarily, they are trying to get the govt to let them install "monitoring" software aka spyware on our computers, they would then connect to your computer thru this software bypassing firewalls and any other security you got in place.



posted on Apr, 19 2010 @ 06:22 AM
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reply to post by Revolution-2012
 


I heard all that! Like to see TPTB get into my machine too, they couldn't even boot it, let alone get in to delete something. Now M$ PCs? That's a different story. Even a novice can get into them.



posted on Apr, 19 2010 @ 06:22 AM
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reply to post by nik1halo
 


thats true, but that could also have the opposite effect, since linux is open source developers could just take the code and re-write it so that it blocks the particular exploit or software



posted on Apr, 19 2010 @ 06:33 AM
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reply to post by autowrench
 


not if properly protected
2nd line.



posted on Apr, 19 2010 @ 06:36 AM
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reply to post by LieBuster
 


Funnily enough the anti-virus software was the easiest to create. I simply created a new front end system with a few algorithms for search and secure tasks (which works better, as I know exactly where most things on my system are, I could personalise it to my system, rather than the generic searches general systems use) and then "borrowed" the bit of code used to attached it to the virus DB for AVG. I haven't quite managed to get it to do an automated update for the DB yet, but I'm sure I'll get there.

Never use mainstream security systems people. At worst, use free, open source software.



posted on Apr, 19 2010 @ 06:36 AM
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This may have the added benefit of giving the government the ability to delete files that they feel are detrimental to them. This would eliminate whistle blowing altogether.
If they had had this ability Waco would never have happened. Apparently the computer room that the three ATF who were Clinton ex-bodyguards, went into before the fourth ATF lobed a grenade at them would never have been a problem. Those three might still be alive, or not. The story goes that the Davidian hackers had come across evidence of a government system of supplying untraceable captured Iraqi guns to street gang leaders to harass the American people and usher in martial law. So the Waco experience was initially an attempt to remove incriminating data from that computer and also to murder four Clinton ex-bodyguards.
But having this ability would make the possibility of having any kind of evidence against the government obsolete. They could just delete evidence by remote.
It might also be expanded, if there's a will there's a way, to take over the finances of many Americans and steel their money. They wouldn't be able to prove anything and we already know that the government is a thief. Just a thought

[edit on 19-4-2010 by m khan]



posted on Apr, 19 2010 @ 06:38 AM
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[edit on 19-4-2010 by MR BOB]



posted on Apr, 19 2010 @ 06:45 AM
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Originally posted by b0sanac
reply to post by nik1halo
 


thats true, but that could also have the opposite effect, since linux is open source developers could just take the code and re-write it so that it blocks the particular exploit or software


Yeah, but then you end up with a game of Cat and Mouse, where the developers block and then the exploiters get around that etc etc etc.

Hackers will ultimately always be one step ahead of the game though, which is why I always keep a couple of good ones online as close allies.

I personally am not a hacker, I'm a software engineer by trade, so I don't know many of the dirty little tricks that they do, but some of them have ingenious ways around problems that us classically educated softies would never think of.

For those of you who are interested in IT security, a good starting point is to learn the basics of hacking. You need to learn the nature of the beast to know how to protect against it. Believe it or not "Hacking for Dummies" is a good starting point.



posted on Apr, 19 2010 @ 07:21 AM
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Originally posted by nik1halo

Originally posted by b0sanac
reply to post by nik1halo
 


Yeah, but then you end up with a game of Cat and Mouse, where the developers block and then the exploiters get around that etc etc etc.

that's true, but that's been happening since the beginning of the internet, copyright "enforcers" and software companies against the people, and its gonna keep happening.


[edit on 19-4-2010 by b0sanac]



posted on Apr, 19 2010 @ 07:56 AM
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The RIAA has been looking for ways to stay alive and relevant for a few years. They have found their Gestapo tactics did them more harm than good with plain old fashion extortion and lawsuits resulting in fines no one can pay.

Now, let's get the government involved. Maybe Obama owes someone a favor associated with the RIAA, who knows or cares.

You see the FCC trying to get involved with the internet, but they have been slapped by the courts. This is the starting point for federal involvement.

There are several programs available that will lock down your computer access to and from the internet. More involved than a firewall. You should have multiple lines of defense as well as an offense, if inclined.

I get tired of the Chinese Ministry of Railroads hitting my ports, so I hit back at times. What's odd is our government plays stupid with cyber crime and anyone with decent software can easily see who is connecting.

As for determining what is legal and illegal, p2p allows downloading from itunes which is legitimate. Then people share those songs. Checksum hasn't changed, but it was legal.

This is just more BS from an outdated organization as far as I'm concerned.



posted on Apr, 19 2010 @ 08:06 AM
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I can't see how this would ever work, surely anyone who has file deleted will probably just get hold of the files again. If anything, it seems like it would encourage more downloading.



posted on Apr, 19 2010 @ 08:07 AM
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*copies music / films / programs / TV series to portable hard drive*


HA! wot ya gonna do now government morons?


on a serious note though...this is still an electronic method of tackling the pirate industry and everyone knows...anything anybody creates (including the government) in terms of technology can and will be modified, removed, turned off or gotten around by regular folk.

i wouldnt worry too much.



posted on Apr, 19 2010 @ 08:09 AM
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Originally posted by Kandinsky
reply to post by harpsounds
 
Looking on the bright side...it'd free up 90% of my hard drive




lawl.


Everyone make sure you save all your stuff into an external HD. I doubt that the fed will be remotely accessing our computers. That sounds hella extreme. One way or another. I don't like them.


Remember those computer viruses that spread like wildfire? Then nothing really happened? hmmmmmm...

[edit on 19-4-2010 by jolly]



posted on Apr, 19 2010 @ 08:25 AM
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Good Luck trying this one is all I can say.

On the off chance this succeeds and legal spyware is installed on all computers, it is only going to make people that much smarter.

At the risk of dating myself, anyone remember the days of buying an LP/Cassette/CD then making a copy for a friend? I see people moving back to this method to a large extent, even if it means setting up a little FTP site on your PC to accommodate the far off friends in other countries since this can be done by most users these days with very basic knowledge.

I am also curious about something. Being in Canada, we have paid a surcharge on all recordable media since the mid-90's to cover the potential for pirating. Due to this we are also allowed, by law, to make backups of anything we purchase. What is to stop this annoying little piece of spyware from illegally deleting valid copies of my originals? Can we sue the record companies for such an invasion and blatant disregard for the law? (not bloody likely)



posted on Apr, 19 2010 @ 08:39 AM
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So, I guess I'll have to start immediately backing-up all my illegal downloads to an offline HD so they won't get deleted?

No Problem!

Thank goodness technology is so cheap and these morons are so stupid.

[edit on 19-4-2010 by tyranny22]



posted on Apr, 19 2010 @ 08:45 AM
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The government cannot do this regardless of what the RIAA wants, it's illegal search and seizure.

Oh wait, Federal Agents can already search and seize laptops without probable cause.

www.cdt.org...

They've already upheld "no cause" search and seizures (confiscation so that they can 'analyze) US Citizens laptops as they re-enter the country, so this RIAA movement would be the next step, fully domestic illegal search of our laptops via software.

We can fight this in the courts and we can write our senators, telling them that allowing the government to install spyware in our computers for ANY reason is illegal search, and that election campaigns and corporations would face serious privacy concerns if this were occurring.



posted on Apr, 19 2010 @ 08:51 AM
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Originally posted by Kandinsky
reply to post by harpsounds
 
Looking on the bright side...it'd free up 90% of my hard drive




this was the funniest thing ive read since i joined ATS


1000 stars for you



posted on Apr, 19 2010 @ 08:52 AM
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reply to post by nik1halo
 


Sounds like you have aq side hook into windows winsoc !

i just used system.net.sockets and bind to a port and will be blocking port 80 on the router to stop any other hidden traffic.

Did you know firefox get about $50m a year from Google and zone alarm lies when it comes to certain sites connected with SSL certificates.

i've not done it but i think i could write a SSL man-in-the-middle type service to pull credit card numbers if i wanted to so you can bet more than a few others have already done so.

Read the terms and conditions for googles IE toolbar and you will see not only is google after your MAC address but also the ID's of local wifi point and they tell the sheep they need this to help location software work.

make no mistake even with our knowlage MS and the CIA/MI5 are able to walk in and see what we are doing any time they like or did you think Bill Gates came to rule the world without backing and thats why i don't trust standard encryption even if it's got a 256bit key.

also note some P3P headders can side step 3rd party cookies rules so you get the cookie, like it or not.

We need to corrupt the data so it becomes useless as blocking traffic is not working else they would had given in trying to use it by now.

One last point is to check out the Tor network if you don't know about it and it also comes with a FF plugin so you can swop IP's at the click of a button.



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