Freemasonry FAQ

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posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 08:34 PM
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reply to post by JoshNorton
 


i saw a special on freemasonry and a master mason or something and on his tombstone was written templar or something it was on the history channel




posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 08:51 PM
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Just a few more, since you offered. I appreciate the opportunity to learn more as my past experiences lead me to believe that FM was a 'secret society' that, according to its members, had few secrets. Most past inquiries were rebutted with coy, clever subterfuge, so I am grateful for this opportunity to expand my knowledge.


Does FM enjoy tax exempt status? If not, how are the property taxes on lodges satisfied, by member dues? If so, how can that be if it is not considered a religion?

Do the 'oaths' required to become a member conflict with other legal / moral obligations? (i.e. Are your forced to withhold information about membership and thus be forced to withhold truth to loved ones or fulfill a military order or divulge information while under oath in a court of law.)

What actions would constitute a member to be banned, admonished or membership terminated? (Or to a lesser degree reprimanded but allowed to remain a member.)

Still waiting on reply to the 'worship' question in prior post.

Thanks again.


[edit on 16-4-2010 by kinda kurious]



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 09:01 PM
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Originally posted by kinda kurious

Does 'worship' occur in these lodges/temples?

Thanks.


No

It doesn't

[edit on 16-4-2010 by Fitzgibbon]



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 09:24 PM
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Originally posted by kinda kurious
Does FM enjoy tax exempt status? If not, how are the property taxes on lodges satisfied, by member dues? If so, how can that be if it is not considered a religion?


I can only speak to my Lodge although I would expect that most if not all Lodges would be in the same boat. We're a non-profit, community group. We do pay taxes on our property. In our case, our Temple building has been re-assessed about 25% higher than it was (which would be funny if it weren't so myopic as the building is a designated historical structure and couldn't fetch the tax valuation on it because of that). Member dues in our Lodge and tenant Lodges are assessed to cover our costs. Some members who've passed to the Grand Lodge above have left bequests in their Wills.

And like I said, we're a non-profit community group.


Originally posted by kinda kurious
Do the 'oaths' required to become a member conflict with other legal / moral obligations? (i.e. Are your forced to withhold information about membership and thus be forced to withhold truth to loved ones or fulfill a military order or divulge information while under oath in a court of law.)


Absolutely not. And addressing the second part of your question, Masons are, in fact, specifically directed throughout all degrees to be upstanding citizens and a credit to society in general.


Originally posted by kinda kurious
What actions would constitute a member to be banned, admonished or membership terminated? (Or to a lesser degree reprimanded but allowed to remain a member.)


Minor trespasses. Like murder, robbery, various and sundry felonies (to get banned, that is). As a Mason, you are expected to conduct yourself in an upright manner and be a model citizen. As for lesser trespasses, that I couldn't say; I suppose it bears looking into to define. However, in general, I would expect it would be something along the lines of 'conduct unbecoming'. Something on that order.

HTH
Fitz



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 09:32 PM
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reply to post by Fitzgibbon
 


Thanks, you have answered all of my questions. I appreciate your honesty and openness. It is often difficult to resist the temptation to make wholesale judgements about certain groups but you represent yours admirably.

Regards...kk



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 09:56 PM
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Originally posted by kinda kurious
reply to post by Fitzgibbon
 


Thanks, you have answered all of my questions. I appreciate your honesty and openness. It is often difficult to resist the temptation to make wholesale judgements about certain groups but you represent yours admirably.

Regards...kk


Gorsch....yer embarassin' meee!
[/Gomer]

In this day and age, snap wholesale judgments are par for the course and Masonry has had a lot of wild and wooly things claimed about it, things that are repeated frequently here and elsewhere. There'll always be someone who has an axe to grind about Masonry and there will always be something out-there thrown out as 'fact' which, if left unchallenged, will be taken as Gospel.

The only way to combat it is to take the ATS axiom of "Deny Ignorance" to heart and make sure that the truth is out there to be found.

Fitz out



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 10:32 PM
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Originally posted by ashanu90
reply to post by JoshNorton
 


i saw a special on freemasonry and a master mason or something and on his tombstone was written templar or something it was on the history channel
Both the York and Scottish Rite Masonic bodies have Templar degrees, but, again, there's no evidence that the Knights Templar that were disbanded by the church in 1312 are in any way related to the organizations that use the same name today.



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 10:45 PM
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Originally posted by ashanu90
reply to post by JoshNorton
 


i saw a special on freemasonry and a master mason or something and on his tombstone was written templar or something it was on the history channel

Can you rephrase that in a complete and logical sentence? With punctuation and a verb if thats not too much to ask.



posted on Apr, 17 2010 @ 12:13 AM
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Thanks for your answer to my earlier question ( I have two of the three mentioned books )


I have one more question , if I may ..

As mentioned earlier , one needs to believe in a " supreme being " in order to become a Mason . We can also see evidence of this when we look at the famous symbol of Freemasonry , the letter G , the square & compass , all placed over an open book . The book usually represents that members " holy book " i.e the bible , Koran , ext .

Based on my assumption mentioned above , and please correct if I am wrong , would it be fair to assume that as a member progresses through the degrees the member can expect to learn more about the great creator based on masonic teaching and history ?



[edit on 17-4-2010 by Max_TO]

[edit on 17-4-2010 by Max_TO]



posted on Apr, 17 2010 @ 12:20 AM
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I think the base of your pyramidic cult consists of many good-hearted people, people proven of such quality that they will never advance beyond the pyramidic base to rise into power among the corrupt and unseen sides.

My question is, how do you justify supporting such an upper chain of masters, or carry the torch for charities on their behalf, knowing who and where the proceeds are highly suspect of benefitiing?



posted on Apr, 17 2010 @ 01:16 AM
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Originally posted by Max_TO
Based on my assumption mentioned above , and please correct if I am wrong , would it be fair to assume that as a member progresses through the degrees the member can expect to learn more about the great creator based on masonic teaching and history ?
No. It is not the place of Masonry to try to tell you something about your God. That's between you and your church, or you and your God if you don't practice an organized religion.



posted on Apr, 17 2010 @ 01:21 AM
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Originally posted by Northwarden
I think the base of your pyramidic cult consists of many good-hearted people, people proven of such quality that they will never advance beyond the pyramidic base to rise into power among the corrupt and unseen sides.

My question is, how do you justify supporting such an upper chain of masters, or carry the torch for charities on their behalf, knowing who and where the proceeds are highly suspect of benefitiing?
First you would have to ask:

  1. What constitutes a "higher level Mason"?
  2. How could such a "high level Mason", if he existed, further their nefarious deeds by getting more and more underlings to do good and charitable things?
Freemasonry is decentralized. There's no overarching body that governs all of Masonry. There are literally hundreds of Grand Lodges in the world, and none is beholding to any other. In most, if not all, the Grand Master is an elected position, generally serving a one year term, democratically elected by the member lodges in their jurisdiction. So at his worst, the "highest ranking Mason" is a Grand Master of one state, and only holds power for one year, and must be duly elected and answer to his members... Assuming an "evil" man got to such a position, what damage could he do that couldn't be overturned by the other brethren?



posted on Apr, 17 2010 @ 01:27 AM
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I am often puzzled that Freemason enthusiasts pop up in unusual places for PR/recruitment drives. I guess its a safer bet than being some poor chump kid being bailed up in a shopping mall by the military.

So:

1. If I see '2B1ASK1' who am I meant to ask?

2. I have friends who are Prince Hall masons (I think). Why do they choose that rather than being integrated?

3. What are some good topics here about Freemasonry after the first three degrees so as not to derail your topic?



posted on Apr, 17 2010 @ 01:27 AM
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reply to post by JoshNorton
 


Thank you for your answer , can you please elaborate ; If a Mason is to grow spiritually and intellectually then how can one learn without being taught about the , great creator and the interpretation of his works ?

I am not implying that the Masons would ever try and teach a " doctrine " but rather an understanding based on recognizing the great creators handy work and how it can be applied on a personal level to gain understanding .

[edit on 17-4-2010 by Max_TO]

[edit on 17-4-2010 by Max_TO]



posted on Apr, 17 2010 @ 01:40 AM
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Originally posted by Max_TO
Thank you for your answer , can you please elaborate ; If a Mason is to grow spiritually and intellectually then how can one learn without being taught about the , great creator and the interpretation of his works ?

I am not implying that the Masons would ever try and teach a " doctrine " but rather an understanding based on recognizing the great creators handy work and how it can be applied on a personal level to gain understanding .
The lessons in Freemasonry are taught through allegories and symbolism.

For instance:

The Bee Hive

Is an emblem of industry, and recommends the practice of that virtue to all created beings, from the highest seraph in heaven to the lowest reptile of the dust. It teaches us that, as we came into the world endowed as rational and intelligent beings, so we should ever be industrious ones; never sitting down contented while our fellow creatures around us are in want, when it is in our power to relieve them, without inconvenience to ourselves.

When we take a survey of nature, we view man in his infancy, more helpless and indigent than the brute creation; he lies languishing for days, months and years, totally incapable of providing sustenance for himself, or guarding against the attack of the wild beasts of the field, or sheltering himself from the inclemencies of the weather.

It might have pleased the great Creator of heaven and earth to have made man independent of all other beings; but, as dependence is one of the strongest bonds of society, mankind were made dependent upon each other for protection and security, as they thereby enjoy better opportunities of fulfilling the duties of reciprocal love and friendship. Thus was man formed for social and active life; the noblest part of the work of God; and he that will so demean himself as not to be endeavoring to add to the common stock of knowledge and understanding, may be deemed a drone in the hive of nature, a useless member of society, and unworthy of our protection as Masons.



posted on Apr, 17 2010 @ 02:00 AM
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reply to post by JoshNorton
 


Very interesting , that story of the Bee Hive . One might take the story its self , as part allegory part symbolism .

May I ask who wrote that story , the Bee Hive ?



[edit on 17-4-2010 by Max_TO]



posted on Apr, 17 2010 @ 06:13 AM
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Originally posted by nal War

So:

1. If I see '2B1ASK1' who am I meant to ask?


A Mason, doesn't matter what degree.


Originally posted by nal War
2. I have friends who are Prince Hall masons (I think). Why do they choose that rather than being integrated?


Prince Hall Masonry has a long history of its own (200 years + IIRC) and much to be proud of. The one PH degree that I've seen has something of a different dynamic than the same degree in the A.F. & A.M. (Ancient Free and Accepted Masons) Lodge that I'm a member of and likewise different from F. & A. M. (Free and Accepted Masons). I'm not sure why there should be any push to 'integration' insofar as all three are coulourblind.


Originally posted by nal War
3. What are some good topics here about Freemasonry after the first three degrees so as not to derail your topic?


Couldn't say. Also, I wouldn't want to be accused of directing the conversation. To the extent that we can answer, we will. The limitations were stated in the OP

HTH
Fitz



posted on Apr, 17 2010 @ 06:35 AM
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*i want to ask what is the difference between normal mason lodges and FREEmasonry?
* are they the same thing or different societies?
* "usualy" are the recuirements easy enough for a person who is just 21 with a "nice" job seeking enlightment?



posted on Apr, 17 2010 @ 06:53 AM
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Originally posted by Stillalive
*i want to ask what is the difference between normal mason lodges and FREEmasonry?
* are they the same thing or different societies?


Same thing. A Rose by any other name......



Originally posted by Stillalive
* "usualy" are the recuirements easy enough for a person who is just 21 with a "nice" job seeking enlightment?


A candidate must be of mature age (varies by jurisdiction; 21 to be safe), sound judgment & strict morals. As long as you can afford the Initiation fees and annual dues (not onerous for anyone with a job), a "nice" job isn't required. You just need to be looking to improve yourself as a man and contribute to society.



posted on Apr, 17 2010 @ 08:40 AM
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Originally posted by Stillalive
*i want to ask what is the difference between normal mason lodges and FREEmasonry?
* are they the same thing or different societies?
* "usualy" are the recuirements easy enough for a person who is just 21 with a "nice" job seeking enlightment?


If you mean stone mason lodges, these are usually labor unions for literal masons that build with bricks.

The only requirement is male, of legal age, no felonies and belief in God. Job doesn't matter.





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