Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

Freemasonry FAQ

page: 1
10
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join

posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 05:40 PM
link   
Hi guys,

Well it's been a year or so since I did one of these threads so I thought I would get one fired up.

Thread Purpose

I want to invite folks to ask any and all questions about Freemasonry. It's easier to answer them if you confine it to one or two per post.

Acceptable Behavior

Because this thread is notorious for flamewars and gang-posting I want to ask that both questioners and answer... uh... ers... remain polite and civil. Of course vibrant intellectual debate is welcome but I don't want us to get shut down over personal attacks.

Unacceptable Behavior

No recruiting or proselytizing.

No ganging up on folks asking questions.

No ganging up on Masons.

Please limit your questions to Blue Lodge (first three degrees) of Freemasonry. This will prevent endless tangents into other societies that can have their own thread.

Guidelines

Hard questions are always welcome but we may not have an answer!

No real Freemason is going to tell you any passwords or secret handshakes.

No real Freemason is going to confirm any information considered "non-monitorial" or private.

Remember, each Mason speaks for himself and practice varies among jurisdictions and geography.




With that said, let's get this party started. It's sure to be an interesting ride!




posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 05:46 PM
link   
Thank you for the opportunity to ask a few questions .

I was wondering in the craft do symbols often have more than one meaning , with the deferent meanings being instilled as one progresses through the ranks ?

What , in your opinion , are the top 3 Masonic books , the must haves ?

Thank you once again

[edit on 16-4-2010 by Max_TO]



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 05:52 PM
link   

Originally posted by Max_TO
Thank you for the opportunity to ask a few questions .

I was wondering in the craft do symbols often have more than one meaning , with the deferent meanings being instilled as one progresses through the ranks .

What , in your opinion , are the top 3 Masonic books , the must haves ?

Thank you once again


I was hoping for the book question.

Without a doubt Secret Teachings of All Ages by Manly Hall; Morals and Dogma is good if you can stay awake LOL!

The Builders looks good too.

Internet Sacred Texts Archive

This site has almost every public domain esoteric book in existence.



About the symbols - They are always left open to the interpretation of the individual, but sometimes the meaning is elaborated upon as the candidate proceeds through the degrees.

Some of them do have more than one meaning, though.

Thanks!



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 05:56 PM
link   
How does one become a Freemason? I'm a young man from California and I would like to join. I believe in God and I believe I have all the other requirements to become one. Is their any special way of joining? Or do I have to pay?



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 06:08 PM
link   

Originally posted by Max_TO
I was wondering in the craft do symbols often have more than one meaning , with the deferent meanings being instilled as one progresses through the ranks ?
In my opinion, no. You hear that a lot, often accompanied by a quote from Albert Pike about low levels not being told the whole story. Our own ATS member Masonic Light explains that quote the best, IMHO... Pike was under the mistaken impression that the Masons had an irrefutable connection to the historic Knights Templar, and since some of the Scottish Rite degrees build on this mythos, and they're never mentioned in the Blue Lodge (or first 3) degrees, he felt that this was something that was only taught in higher degrees.

Where he was mistaken is that there is no irrefutable proof of such a connection. People have speculated, but nobody's ever been able to show a direct lineage beyond a reasonable doubt.

It's my opinion that the people who were writing many of the degrees in the late 1700s and early 1800s got caught up with the romanticism of chivalry (as well as a newfound interest in egyptology, among other topics) and instilled them in some of the Scottish Rite degrees. But that's not a deception played on the lower degrees, just a misunderstanding based on additional allegorical plays.

As a 32° member of the Scottish Rite, Southern Jurisdiction, I can say I've seen no instance where a symbol is defined one way in one degree and later recanted to an entirely different meaning in a later degree.



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 06:12 PM
link   

Originally posted by Romantic_Rebel
Is their any special way of joining? Or do I have to pay?
The traditional answer is, "2B1ASK1"... Yeah. Masons getting all 1337 speak... To be one, ask one. Your best bet is finding a lodge in your area, finding out what nights they meet, and going down and introducing yourself, perhaps join them for dinner. Ask questions. Get to know who they are and what they're about.

You do have to pay. Application fees vary by lodge. I think I payed $100 when I turned in my application. If they vote against letting you join, you'll get your application fee returned to you.



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 06:15 PM
link   
reply to post by JoshNorton
 


Thank you. I know of one (maybe two) in my area and I think they're really good guys. So, it looks like I have a chance to be a member.



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 06:19 PM
link   

Originally posted by JoshNorton

Originally posted by Romantic_Rebel
Is their any special way of joining? Or do I have to pay?
The traditional answer is, "2B1ASK1"... Yeah. Masons getting all 1337 speak... What in the world does that mean?



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 06:20 PM
link   

Originally posted by JoshNorton

Originally posted by Romantic_Rebel
Is their any special way of joining? Or do I have to pay?
The traditional answer is, "2B1ASK1"... Yeah. Masons getting all 1337 speak...

What does that mean?



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 06:23 PM
link   
reply to post by Romantic_Rebel
 


It means, to be a Mason ask a Mason.

2nd.



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 06:25 PM
link   
reply to post by Namaste
 


Alright, Thanks man. I didn't notice that.



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 06:36 PM
link   
I live in Europe and the whole Mason thing is pretty unknown here. so my question to you is:


1) Is Freemasonry present through out the world or is it just confined to America?

2) Is Freemasonry a religion?

3) How old is Freemasonry?

4) If there was one truth that freemasonry holds what truth would it be?

5) Does being a freemason give you any advantage in this world?

6) a- Can anyone become a freemason or is it something you need to be born in?

b- If anyone can become a freemason how does one go about doing it?

7) What books could you propose me to read if I wanted to know more about freemasonry?

8) How do I obtain the vast and dark knowledge freemasonry holds if such a thing even exists?



Now all the superficial questions out of the way, some knowledgeble people can start posting indept inquiries.



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 06:44 PM
link   
Just as an addendum to what's already been posted about becoming a Mason, you don't have to know one to join a Lodge. In my case, Masonry had skipped a generation and nobody I knew was a Mason. So I just Googled a Lodge near me and contacted the Lodge Secretary who arranged to meet me, show me around the Lodge and answer some of the questions I had.

He (and on his good word, another Mason) decided to sponsor me and the next step was a Committee of Investigation. A Past Master of the Lodge and two other brethren came out to do a second interview. Once they satisfied themselves on behalf of the Lodge that I was joining for the right reasons, they in turn reported back to the Lodge. If the reports are positive, there's then a vote among the brethren and if that's positive, that's when you're Initiated.

HTH
Fitz



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 06:52 PM
link   

Originally posted by colloredbrothers
I live in Europe and the whole Mason thing is pretty unknown here. so my question to you is:

1) Is Freemasonry present through out the world or is it just confined to America?


Worldwide although from what I've read, Masonry on the Continent is more low-key than it is in North America.


Originally posted by colloredbrothers
2) Is Freemasonry a religion?


No. It's an adjunct to one's own faith and is intended to bolster a brother's faith.


Originally posted by colloredbrothers
3) How old is Freemasonry?


Modern Masonry dates back to 1717 with the founding of the United Grand Lodge of England. However, it dates back in actuality before that although it's not really possible to state definitively how far back.


Originally posted by colloredbrothers
4) If there was one truth that freemasonry holds what truth would it be?


Be a good and upstanding member of society


Originally posted by colloredbrothers
5) Does being a freemason give you any advantage in this world?


Not in and of itself. Its only advantage is working alongside a disparate group of men for the general betterment of mankind.


Originally posted by colloredbrothers
6) a- Can anyone become a freemason or is it something you need to be born in?


Regular Freemasonry is open to any adult man of good character who believes in a Supreme Being.


Originally posted by colloredbrothers
b- If anyone can become a freemason how does one go about doing it?


Google Freemasonry in your area and ask.


Originally posted by colloredbrothers
7) What books could you propose me to read if I wanted to know more about freemasonry?


I'll leave that to others with a better library than I have.


Originally posted by colloredbrothers
8) How do I obtain the vast and dark knowledge freemasonry holds if such a thing even exists?


You don't because it doesn't.


HTH
Fitz



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 06:55 PM
link   

Originally posted by colloredbrothers
I live in Europe and the whole Mason thing is pretty unknown here. so my question to you is:


1) Is Freemasonry present through out the world or is it just confined to America?
It's pretty much worldwide. It is illegal in most countries run by dictators or tyrants, but it exists throughout most of the democratic world...


2) Is Freemasonry a religion?
No. In most countries it requires a belief in God, but doesn't dictate what that god's name is, or how you should worship him. It doesn't offer a plan of salvation. It encourages the individual to live a spiritual life.


3) How old is Freemasonry?
Modern Freemasonry goes back to the formation of the United Grand Lodge of England (UGLE) in 1717. There are a few documents that have been found that show existence of individual lodges a few hundred years older than that, I think. There are some who claim that it goes all the way back to the building of King Solomon's Temple, or the age of Pythagorus, but that's a lot of mythology and wishful thinking. No proof of any of that.


4) If there was one truth that freemasonry holds what truth would it be?
All men are equal and should be treated fairly.


5) Does being a freemason give you any advantage in this world?
No, and any petitioner who seeks to join for mercenary purposes will be denied. On the other hand, the teachings of Masonry can, indeed, change your life for the better if you let them.


6) a- Can anyone become a freemason or is it something you need to be born in?
Any man, free born, sound of mind and members and coming under the tongue of good report, of lawful age and properly vouched for can join. We don't recruit. You have to come to us and say you want to join.


b- If anyone can become a freemason how does one go about doing it?
Knock on the door of the lodge and ask.


7) What books could you propose me to read if I wanted to know more about freemasonry?
See previous answers in this thread.


8) How do I obtain the vast and dark knowledge freemasonry holds if such a thing even exists?
Dark knowledge? I've never heard of such a thing. ALL knowledge can but strengthen any who seek it. Masonry doesn't teach anything you can't get elsewhere through other paths. It's not unique. Read a hundred philosophers, go to a hundred churches, digest a thousand books, and you'll be just as well off. Masonry teaches lessons through symbols and allegory, but they're the same lessons that have been around since the dawn of man... Be excellent to each other. (And party on, dudes!)

[edit on 4/16/2010 by JoshNorton]



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 07:11 PM
link   
What is the basis (if any) for the rift between FM and Roman Catholic Church?

If FM is not a religion, why are "lodges" sometimes referred to "temples?"

Thanks.



[edit on 16-4-2010 by kinda kurious]



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 08:06 PM
link   

Originally posted by kinda kurious
What is the basis (if any) for the rift between FM and Roman Catholic Church?


As an Anglican I can't honestly say. I can say that my Lodge has more than a few Catholic members and even a couple who are also Knights of Columbus (Catholic equivalent to Freemasonry)


Originally posted by kinda kurious
If FM is not a religion, why are "lodges" sometimes referred to "temples?"

Thanks.


The Lodge is the membership, the building is the Temple. While Freemasonry isn't itself a religion, it has certain religious requirements of its members, specifically a belief in a Supreme Being and many of the teachings use the Temple of King Solomon in an allegorical manner.



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 08:15 PM
link   

Originally posted by Fitzgibbon
The Lodge is the membership, the building is the Temple. While Freemasonry isn't itself a religion, it has certain religious requirements of its members, specifically a belief in a Supreme Being and many of the teachings use the Temple of King Solomon in an allegorical manner.


Does 'worship' occur in these lodges/temples?

Thanks.



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 08:22 PM
link   
reply to post by emsed1
 




ask any and all questions about Freemasonry


1) Why join?

If freemasonry is merely the do-good social club that freemasons usually claim it to be, what reason is there to join freemasonry as oposed to rotary, kiwanis, the boy scouts, the peace corps, or any other of dozens of do-good social clubs?

2) Generally speaking, how does the organization of freemasonry deal with the motivations of new recruits?

Given the reputation that freemasonry has, even if it is just a do-good social club...it seems very likely to me that it would attract large numbers of people who believe that it's more than that. Especially since you're not supposed to advertise. Only people who come of their own are admitted. So, again, since presumably a lot of people who would "come of their own" to freemasonry are motivated by desires for power, being one of the "in" crowd, taking over the world, etc. how does your organization deal with that?



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 08:32 PM
link   


1) Why join?

If freemasonry is merely the do-good social club that freemasons usually claim it to be, what reason is there to join freemasonry as oposed to rotary, kiwanis, the boy scouts, the peace corps, or any other of dozens of do-good social clubs?


There is no reason to join Freemasonry as opposed to those other clubs. I'd say if You join any Fraternity that does Good for yourself and the community; Good on You



2) Generally speaking, how does the organization of freemasonry deal with the motivations of new recruits?

Given the reputation that freemasonry has, even if it is just a do-good social club...it seems very likely to me that it would attract large numbers of people who believe that it's more than that. Especially since you're not supposed to advertise. Only people who come of their own are admitted. So, again, since presumably a lot of people who would "come of their own" to freemasonry are motivated by desires for power, being one of the "in" crowd, taking over the world, etc. how does your organization deal with that?



It's quite simple really. We do an investigative committe and ask them questions to get a general feel for that; as well as a background check.

During the investigative committee it's pretty easy to tell if they have a mercenary motive, and if it fails to reveal itself there; it will later. When/if it does it is usally addressed and more often than not the member will just discontinue attending Lodge. Should it never be addressed, when/if they realize it's not some secret route to power, they will just stop attending Lodge.





new topics

top topics



 
10
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join