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Fingernails Can Reveal Health Problems

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posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 08:17 PM
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Stop what you are doing and take a minute to look at your fingernails.

Do you have pale distinctly rounded moons in each fingernail, or are the "moons" zigzagged with dips and peaks instead of rounded? Do you have white spots in your nails? How about deep ridges? Are the ridges vertical or horizontal?

All of these variations in your nails may be indicators of underlying health problems.

One of the biggest problems in our society is that we have not been taught to take responsibility for our own health. We have been conditioned to turn our bodies over to other authorities. We have never learned how to listen when our body reveals potential problems.

Subtle messages of your health conditions can be found by variations in the eyes, tongue, teeth, and fingernails. There are numerous other indicators as well, but oftentimes people have no clue until pain errupts. Knowing how to read your body's signals could possibly prevent serious illness by learning what nutrition the body needs to correct itself.

For the past few years, I have often looked at the nails of friends and family and looked up their particular nail imperfections in a book I have. It has usually been pretty accurate.

According to Dr. Chi's Method of Fingernail and Tongue Analysis, "opaqueness of nails with a red horizontal rim at the tip of the nail is indicative of kidney disorders."

I read this to my friend and within two weeks she called to tell me she had been diagnosed with a kidney stone.

The good thing about being able to learn about your own body through simple signs is being able to know what you can do to troubleshoot problems.

Much has been written about using apple cider vinegar to help pass kidney stones. But learning about natural healing involves taking responsibility to do the research and to weigh the sources for validity and documentation. It requires time and effort. Something as simple as certain vitamins and minerals can correct some conditions. And fresh juices are much more effective than pills. Herbal teas can often give good results, too. If you are a novice, don't guess and don't depend on self diagnosis. Spend some time talking with people in your local health food stores who are certified and knowledgeable. Read books. Attend herbal seminars.

Did you know that a black spot in your fingernail can indicate an internal bleeding problem? I had this happen to me several years ago and this was what led me to finding what nail oddities meant. And yes, soon after the black spot appeared, I found I had an ulcer!




posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 08:41 PM
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What does the moon thing mean? And how about ridges, running from back to tip, not side to side?

I have moons missing from some, the ones on my thumbs look like vulcanoes, and lots of white spots.

I have major health problems, it is I can't get the authorities to aknowledge it.

[edit on 15-4-2010 by nixie_nox]



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 09:25 PM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox
What does the moon thing mean? And how about ridges, running from back to tip, not side to side?

I have moons missing from some, the ones on my thumbs look like vulcanoes, and lots of white spots.



The correct term for the small, white, half moon shape at the base of your fingernails is called the lunulae. It is the first and most important factor to consider when you are diagnosing fingernails.

The lunulae represent the cellular oxygen levels and indicate conditions about circulation. You should have lunulae on all fingernails except the pinky.

You may want to start by researching lunulae and finding some images that help to define your own nails to determine what should be normal.



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 10:01 PM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox
What does the moon thing mean? And how about ridges, running from back to tip, not side to side?


I found a couple of interesting starting points for research that I figured I'd share here:

From the American Academy of Family Physicians journal:
Nail Abnormalities: Clues to Systemic Disease

From handresearch.com ("Scientific Palm Reading and Palmistry"): The Nail Tutor

From Natural Health Techniques:
Fingernail Analysis



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 12:04 PM
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reply to post by americandingbat
 


Thank you for that.



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 04:12 PM
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reply to post by nixie_nox
 


My pleasure


Unfortunately most of what I found wasn't really that helpful, even if it was interesting. There's just too many "rule outs" and "can be part of normal aging".

For instance, I have vertical ridges on the nails of my thumbs and ring fingers, and very small or no lunulae on the fingers of my left hand.

Here's what the Natural Health Techniques says about this:


Vertical Ridges and Split Nails: Lots of rule-outs here, but they include--Adrenal gland problems, arthritic tendencies, asthma, broken heart, bronchitis, calcium deficiency, chronic fatigue, chronic inflammation, chronic stress, depression, emotional trauma, excretory system conditions, hyperactivity or overexertion, iron deficiency, kidney problems, laryngitis, nervous problems, poor digestion/absorption in the small intestine, chemicals from food, dieting, protein deficiency, respiratory problems, unhappiness, Vitamin A deficiency, yeast and other fungi, lupus, chemo or radiation side effect, drugs or prescription use.

Fewer than 8 lunulae: Many rule-outs here such as poor circulation, anemia, fatigue, not enough oxygenation or exercise, heart disease, imbalanced nervous system, numbness, protein deficiency, Vitamin A deficiency or weak-spirited (low life force or "chi"). The most common cause I see is that people forget to breathe and forget to take deep breaths.

The Thumb: Reflects what is going on in the brain, excretory system and in the reproductive organs.

Ring Fingers: Reflects what is going on in the reproductive organs and the hormonal system.

Source


The article from the American Family Physicians journal seems to see both conditions as reflecting normal aging (in the absence of other signs like discoloration).

So really, it doesn't tel me much I didn't already know: I'm getting older than I used to be, I've had a lot of stress and heartache, I have tendencies to depression and fatigue. I should exercise more, remember to take deep breaths, and stop smoking again. I may have some vitamin/mineral deficiency (subclinical) and/or difficulty absorbing and using those nutrients.

edit to add: Oh yeah, and I should use more moisturizer

[edit on 4/16/2010 by americandingbat]



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 05:47 PM
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Originally posted by americandingbat
For instance, I have vertical ridges on the nails of my thumbs and ring fingers, and very small or no lunulae on the fingers of my left hand.





As I mentioned earlier, the lunulae reflect the oxygen saturation of the tissues. Very small, or no lunulae could indicate some sort of circulatory or lymphatic system blockage. This gives you an idea of direction for you to investigate. Cayenne pepper and ginger are reputed to help with circulation and someone who deals in lymphatic massage would have a feel for the lymphatic system to be able to tell you indicators of blockage that they might recognize through massage therapy.

This book also says that hormone functions are lower with smaller lunulae. From there, you could investigate how decreased hormones effect your body. Maybe your hair is falling out, etc. The information in the book is to give you direction for understanding where to look for the root of your problems. Once you can validate that, then you can go on to discover natural treatments to help get you back into balance.

Are the vertical ridges on your nail bumpy? It could be what is called "beads on a string" type of manifestation. There are other indications that must be taken in consideration with the vertical ridges in order to put together a cohesive pattern. Is the nail shaped like a spoon--in other words, concave instead of convex? Is the nail easily torn or split? Is the nail yellow? Is it thick? Is the nail whitish or dull in luster? Does the nail have small point-like indentions throughout?

According to Dr. Chi's method, you cannot isolate just one aspect and expect to make a diagnosis according to that. You must build a complete picture and then you are more likely to find the direction of the health problem(s). Only then can you work toward resolution and bringing the body back to balance.


[edit on 16-4-2010 by Alethea]

[edit on 16-4-2010 by Alethea]



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 09:12 PM
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My nails have dips and hills running vertically. I assumed they just grow funny.



posted on Apr, 17 2010 @ 01:21 AM
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Originally posted by InvisibleAlbatross
My nails have dips and hills running vertically. I assumed they just grow funny.


Would this be like bumpy raised dots? Like beads on a string? Or would you say it is more irregular shaped and misformed?

What else can you tell me about the color and shape of your nails? Are they triangle shaped---small at the nail bed and wider as they grow outward? Is the basic shape short and wide? Are the nails extremely narrow? Do they turn up like a spoon at the edge? Or do they curve downward at the edge rather than growing straight out? Are they brittle or do they split? Do they peel?

There are so many factors that have to be addressed in order to narrow it down to a common denominator that links several indications.



posted on Apr, 17 2010 @ 02:09 AM
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Originally posted by Alethea



Originally posted by americandingbat
For instance, I have vertical ridges on the nails of my thumbs and ring fingers, and very small or no lunulae on the fingers of my left hand.


Are the vertical ridges on your nail bumpy? It could be what is called "beads on a string" type of manifestation. There are other indications that must be taken in consideration with the vertical ridges in order to put together a cohesive pattern. Is the nail shaped like a spoon--in other words, concave instead of convex? Is the nail easily torn or split? Is the nail yellow? Is it thick? Is the nail whitish or dull in luster? Does the nail have small point-like indentions throughout?


Hmm, on my right thumbnail one the ridges are a little bit bumpy, but not on my other thumb or my ring fingers. As for the rest of your questions, I wouldn't say so. Maybe a little bit dull, but that's probably just me wishing they always looked buffed without doing the work of buffing them



posted on Apr, 17 2010 @ 10:53 AM
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reply to post by Alethea
 


They feel like washboards and are very weak, but look normal. It's only when I feel them, that I notice.



posted on Apr, 17 2010 @ 12:40 PM
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One of the more common reasons for fingernail ridges is intestinal parasites. I'm surprised that the above references didn't include that in their list. Both alternative medical practitioners and mainstream medicine have effective cures.

Diagnosis is not expensive, nor is the treatment. The trick is to stay clear once you get clear.



posted on Apr, 17 2010 @ 12:43 PM
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reply to post by Uphill
 




Now I am paranoid. It's not on all of my nails, just my thumbs and one pinkie



posted on Apr, 17 2010 @ 02:48 PM
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Originally posted by Uphill
One of the more common reasons for fingernail ridges is intestinal parasites. I'm surprised that the above references didn't include that in their list.


Dr. Chi's Method book does mention indicators to look for in determining parasites. It is not my intention to diagnose anyone according to one specific marker. It is my intention to make people aware of what should be normal in the character of fingernails, and then to be able to compare abnormal differences they may have in order to correct and balance their health. People are enpowered when they realize they have the ability to do this. But it does require effort, research and the willingness to learn. It is also important to build a composite analysis of all the factors that one can easily observe--not just nails, but learning to read indications through tongue, teeth, stools, and urine.

If parasites are indicated, then there may be other problems associated with that as well, such as anemia or blood problems.

A "parasite cleanse" is not the be-all end-all answer to a fingernail abnormality.

If one has indicators through other symptoms as well, and parasites are suspected, then a lab diagnosis would be in order to confirm the suspicions. Self-treatment can cause harm if you don't have accurate information and know what you are doing. Different types of parasites require different types of treaments---whether you are using allopathic medicine or herbal treatments.

There are a few diagnostic laboratories that concentrate specifically on parasites as a specialty. It would be my recommendation to search them out.



posted on May, 24 2010 @ 02:47 PM
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This is really cool stuff!!

My nails are completely ruined from decades of applying fake nails to them. I would advise everyone to NEVER use fake nails that you apply yourself. If I had known what they would have ended up doing to my nails, I never would have used them.

My nail are almost non exsistant!! And, I am having trouble getting them to grow back. My cuticles are destroyed and present problems almost daily. The nail on my fingers are super thin and gone in alot of areas.

Though I do have some serious health issues, it would be impossible for me to use this method because of the severe damage to my nails....




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