It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Tapeworm Brain Infection 'Serious Health Concern'

page: 1
2

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 10:09 AM
link   

ScienceDaily (Apr. 15, 2010) — Tapeworm infections of the brain, which can cause epileptic seizures, appear to be increasing in Mexico and bordering southwestern states, Loyola University Health System researchers report.

In Mexico, up to 10 percent of the population may have the infection, neurocysticercosis. While many people never develop symptoms, neurocysticercosis nevertheless "remains a serious health concern, especially among the poor," Loyola researchers wrote in the journal Neurological Research.


www.sciencedaily.com...

Living in Southern California this makes me very nervous. If it has made its way into the southwestern states of the US its only a matter of time before it is seen across all US states. It seems everywhere you look in todays world things keep getting worse. I think its only a matter of time before this becomes a major problem everywhere. What do you think?

Mod Edit: External Source Tags – Please Review This Link.

[edit on 15/4/2010 by Mirthful Me]




posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 10:12 AM
link   
Yeah, I'd say that's a serious health concern! I think just reading about that is going to give me some serious nightmares.



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 10:22 AM
link   

Originally posted by Cincinnatus
Yeah, I'd say that's a serious health concern! I think just reading about that is going to give me some serious nightmares.



Ya me to, everytime my eyes get blurry I will wonder if I got one of those in me.

[edit on 15-4-2010 by Trudge]



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 10:28 AM
link   
Congratulations on the most understated description!

Tape Worms in Brain are "Serious Health Concern."

I think that deserves a big'ol No-#-Really?!? Worms in BRAINS are "Serious?" Really! Who'd have thunk it!



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 11:11 AM
link   
I have seen dozens of people come in with these infections where I work.

Some people have two, three, even four or more of the cycts in their brain. The frequency is indeed increasing, but not because of US food standards.

Usually, the persons with these infections are Hispanic, though I have seen one non-Hispanic person with the infection.

Often times, the first symptom is a seizure, when, if experienced when alone, a person may not even realize they are having them. Severe unrelenting headaches also prompt people to seek medical attention.

Typically, this is not considered a rampant disease in the US, however with migration issues as they have been of recent years, more and more infections are being discovered in the US.


Where is cysticercosis found?
The tapeworm that causes cysticercosis is found worldwide. Infection is found most often in rural, developing countries with poor hygiene where pigs are allowed to roam freely and eat human feces. This allows the tapeworm infection to be completed and the cycle to continue. Infection can occur, though rarely, if you have never traveled outside of the United States. Taeniasis and cysticercosis are very rare in Muslim countries where eating pork is forbidden.


www.cdc.gov...


There is not any better advertising for cooking pork thoroughly and washing your hands than this!



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 11:22 AM
link   

Originally posted by Libertygal
I have seen dozens of people come in with these infections where I work.

Some people have two, three, even four or more of the cycts in their brain. The frequency is indeed increasing, but not because of US food standards.

Usually, the persons with these infections are Hispanic, though I have seen one non-Hispanic person with the infection.

Often times, the first symptom is a seizure, when, if experienced when alone, a person may not even realize they are having them. Severe unrelenting headaches also prompt people to seek medical attention.

Typically, this is not considered a rampant disease in the US, however with migration issues as they have been of recent years, more and more infections are being discovered in the US.


Where is cysticercosis found?
The tapeworm that causes cysticercosis is found worldwide. Infection is found most often in rural, developing countries with poor hygiene where pigs are allowed to roam freely and eat human feces. This allows the tapeworm infection to be completed and the cycle to continue. Infection can occur, though rarely, if you have never traveled outside of the United States. Taeniasis and cysticercosis are very rare in Muslim countries where eating pork is forbidden.


www.cdc.gov...


There is not any better advertising for cooking pork thoroughly and washing your hands than this!




Thank you for your reply and your insight into this Libertygal. If 10 percent of the mexican population does have this, and with the increase of immigration across our boarder, I think it will pose a serious health risk to the United States not from just pork, but from all produce that is picked by hand and bought by comsumers in the US. I would definitly agree with you that this is one of the best reasons to make sure to cook pork thoroughly.



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 11:34 AM
link   
You do have a point, though produce has always been an issue.

Usually, produce from the US is known to be harvested by "migrant workers", and when Iwas growing up, my mother instilled into my brain early to wash my food before eating it.

I would view any produce from outside the US in the same manner, though we don't typically know where our food is imported from.

Hygiene is definitely a major role in this and other diseases, such as E-Coli. Take for example the spinach scare not too long ago. Even if it is
"ready to eat" from the bag, wash it. I have one of those salad spinners, and put prepared salads in it and wash it just to be on the safe side.

Thanks for the article, though, it was interesting to see this being brought up. It usually makes the news cycles every year or two, and it's always a good reminder to handle food products safely.

I can say that usually, recovery after brain surgery is fairly quick, though terribly frightening. After all digging into the brain can have some unexpected results, but for the most part people do recover well.

I did see one person die, who also had mad cow disease, though. Could you imagine having both? *shudder*.

Here is a cool story ><





[edit on 15-4-2010 by Libertygal]



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 11:44 AM
link   

Originally posted by Libertygal


I did see one person die, who also had mad cow disease, though. Could you imagine having both? *shudder*.




WOW Both!! Man I can't imagine having one let alone both!!! Thanks for your sharing your knowledge. I would also think that if enough people in the US got this we would also have to be concerned with eating food at restaurants or fast food. If someone who had this didn't wash properly they could infect everyone they served food to. It doesn't even have to be on the actual food itself just the wrapper of fast food or the plates, chairs, or silverware of the restaurants

[edit on 15-4-2010 by Trudge]

[edit on 15-4-2010 by Trudge]

[edit on 15-4-2010 by Trudge]



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 12:54 PM
link   
Sadly, I can see this becoming an epidemic in the Southwestern states, if not delt with ASAP.

I have compiled some useful information from education and currently studied material;

Taenia solium, which discussed in the article is the pork tapeworm. To make clear that this worm is hosted by humans(as a Definitive Host then returned to pigs), it is not the worm that affects your pets(just related to it). It is the most common tapeworm to affect humans. It is transferred to and by people eating contaminated(pig eating human feces) and or raw pork ...and contaminated by eggs coming in contact with hands/other foods.

To compare and contrast worms:

Taenia, is a flatworm, a cestode

Taenia saginata beef tapeworm(man is also the Definitive Host for)

Dogs and cats are infected by Taenia pisiformis it is related to solium and Dipylidium caninum(most common in dogs and cats). Human infection status is low, but higher in children who may swallow a flea easier.

Life cycle or worms in dogs and cats:
▪flea(intermediate host) eats tapeworm egg from infected feces=infected
▪dog or cat eats infected flea while grooming=infected
▪dog eats rabbit, rat or mouse(intermediate host)=infected
▪cat eats rat or mouse=infected


Taenia solium pork tapeworm life cycle;
▪human as the intermediate host
▪either the eggs or proglottids(segements of the worm containing eggs) being passed in the feces lasting months in vegetation
▪pigs ingest contaminated vegetation with eggs or proglottids
oncospheres hatch in the small intestine and invade the intestinal wall to travel to the striated muscles to develop into cysticerci
▪each proglotted containing eggs can carry 50,000 eggs
▪the cysticercus take two months to develop into adults, while in the intestines.
Wikipedia has a good image of this.

Prevention and TX by Medication
In Veterinary medicine(FDA approved) as well as with human medicine(FDA approved in US but not approved in UK) Praziquantel is frequently used. Praziquental caused paralysis of the tapeworm and dissolves it. Droncit is also used.

With Veterinary field experience and general pet ownership, I can say tapeworm is the hardest and most annoying worm to control. I just don't see it any different with Taenia solium.

References:
PetPlacePetEducation
WikipediaMerck Vet Manual
WildlifeInformation



posted on Apr, 19 2010 @ 04:19 PM
link   

Originally posted by Aeons
Congratulations on the most understated description!

Tape Worms in Brain are "Serious Health Concern."

I think that deserves a big'ol No-#-Really?!? Worms in BRAINS are "Serious?" Really! Who'd have thunk it!


I was always under the impression that tapeworms only infested the intestinal tract and thrived in/on fecal matter. If there is any truth to this story... then it would certainly give new credence to anyone accused of having shi* for brains.



posted on Apr, 19 2010 @ 04:33 PM
link   
reply to post by Libertygal
 




Sounds to me like we're talking about trichinosis here... not tapeworms.



posted on Apr, 19 2010 @ 04:57 PM
link   

Originally posted by Trudge

Living in Southern California this makes me very nervous. If it has made its way into the southwestern states of the US its only a matter of time before it is seen across all US states. It seems everywhere you look in todays world things keep getting worse. I think its only a matter of time before this becomes a major problem everywhere. What do you think?

Mod Edit: External Source Tags – Please Review This Link.

[edit on 15/4/2010 by Mirthful Me]


Tapeworms have been in the states for a long long time. In fact they are everywhere there is a stomach, intestine, or brain to feed off of.

If you have an outdoor cat do me a favor. Check it's vomit sometime. I'm sure you will find more than one kind of worm in there, including a tapeworm.



posted on Apr, 19 2010 @ 06:00 PM
link   
You just have to be careful handling and cooking pork. Roundworms are also a risk with raw pork which can be pretty dangerous if the worms get pissed off and migrate (usually from anesthetics).


Ascaris is notorious for its reputation to migrate within the small intestine, and when a large worm begins to migrate there is not much that can stop it. Instances have been reported in which Ascaris have migrated into and blocked the bile or pancreatic duct or in which the worms have penetrated the small intestine resulting in acute (and fatal) peritonitis. Ascaris seems to be especially sensitive to anesthetics, and numerous cases have been documented where patients in surgical recovery rooms have had worms migrate from the small intestine, through the stomach, and out the patient's nose or mouth.


Source



[edit on 19-4-2010 by TheMadHatter]



new topics

top topics



 
2

log in

join