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parents are being overprotective mentally challenged individuals yet again

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posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 05:09 PM
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People do not need the government censoring books for them.

Books Bans are are wrong.

I believe only lazy parents who are/or/and Christians/religious extremists support book bans.

By the way, the title of this thread is inappropriate, the word retard is offensive to many people when applied in this manner. There are other words that can describe proponents of this censoring action.

Like Lazy!




posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 05:12 PM
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reply to post by hotbakedtater
 


thanks for your insight i will make it politically correct then



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 05:38 PM
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new zealand is all about banning stuff to i just dont ubderstand why some parents are so worthless



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 09:30 PM
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Originally posted by AccessDenied
Iam not christian.
Iam a lover of vampire mythology.
But as for Twilight? GARBAGE. I don't care if it is banned or burned.
Whether it be book or movie..trash.
I would prefer my kids to read or watch something that will boost their intelligence..not lower their IQ to that of the "entertained" masses.


I enjoy reading up on mythology and lore. Things that have the lore-slaughtering aftermath like Twilight sadden me greatly. I weep for that generation.



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 10:25 PM
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another thing i have noticed are these hyperventalating obssesed horny twilight fan girls i have never seen anything like this since the star wars geeks and they look normal compared to alot of twilight fans



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 10:32 PM
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reply to post by ashanu90
 


another thing ive noticed is that the newest generation is coming up with the most untalented garbage and im not just talking about twilight, i mean lady gaga, kesha, whatever that band is taht sings dont trust a ho, bakugon wich i have ha the misfortune of sitting through five minutes of(it made beyblade, yugioh and digimon look less childish), lets not forget carrie underwood and anything on american idol(people truly are worshiping those idiots on that show) and anything that is reality tv shows(the real world, mtv cribs, etc)



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 10:58 PM
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reply to post by ashanu90
 


This thread is sour grapes from a child. Nothing more.

How about this: Twilight isn't being banned. It is being discussed for exclusion from school libraries. You said it yourself in your post: not all content is meant for kids. All they are doing is trying to uphold what you are proclaiming.

Now, what are you complaining about? It is ok to rant, but you should really think about what you are ranting. Adolescent logic doesn't work on adults.



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 11:16 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


yeah ive gone a little too far with the ranting and i think this thread has derailed like crazy but i guess theres less to be said than i thought



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 11:22 PM
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Well here is the deal, any private library,any movie theater, any parent, any book store, any publisher and any distributer can "ban" anything they want. The only thing that can't be done is the government to say that a book can't be sold. For example a newspaper stand can choose not to carry a paper, but the government cant step in and say you can't carry this paper.
Parents have every right to choose what their kid sees and does not see, sure dumb parents make dumb choices. And those parents have nobody to blame but themselves when the kids grow up and want nothing to do with them.



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 11:28 PM
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Originally posted by zaiger
Well here is the deal, any private library,any movie theater, any parent, any book store, any publisher and any distributer can "ban" anything they want. The only thing that can't be done is the government to say that a book can't be sold. For example a newspaper stand can choose not to carry a paper, but the government cant step in and say you can't carry this paper.
Parents have every right to choose what their kid sees and does not see, sure dumb parents make dumb choices. And those parents have nobody to blame but themselves when the kids grow up and want nothing to do with them.

excellent answer

but i wonder why they get so lazy and just want to get it banned?which is sort of a paradox because isnt alot easier to tell a child no than it is to march to the whitehouse or local government building holding picket signs and making speeches and forming boycott groups?

[edit on 14-4-2010 by ashanu90]



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 11:33 PM
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reply to post by ashanu90
 


Look, i am among the more liberal parents. My 17 year old hasn't had a curfew in 3 years. Of course, he is a top athlete and honors student, so he has earned my trust.

My 12 year old and i play COD on Xbox live all the time. He does what he is supposed to do, and we don't have any problems.

But when it comes to the information that my kids access, i pay attention. My older son, i put whatever i can in his hands. He is too bright to be fooled by BS. But the younger one? I have to be very careful. He is prone to propaganda. I will teach him, but until he learns i have to remember: Garbage in, garbage out.

It isn't about banning what is "cool". It is about putting controls on what is controversial, so there isn't free and open access without parental involvement.

Yeah, some parents really suck. Maybe i do...i don't think so, but people rarely assess themselves realistically. But i can say i try, and i can say that i put leadership as a high priority.

I know you feel it is unfair and all that. But reread all your posts in this thread. But when you do, read from the perspective of a 35 year old. Given the histrionics and ranting we have seen over this relatively innocuous article, do you understand why adults are concerned when it comes to the kinds of things kids are exposed to/alllowed to do? Strong decision making and stable emotional response are not the forte of your average person under 17.



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 11:36 PM
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reply to post by ashanu90
 


Its not about their child they do not want anyone's child reading it. It is just a group of people trying to push their beliefs and "standards" on others.



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 11:37 PM
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Originally posted by ashanu90

Originally posted by zaiger
Well here is the deal, any private library,any movie theater, any parent, any book store, any publisher and any distributer can "ban" anything they want. The only thing that can't be done is the government to say that a book can't be sold. For example a newspaper stand can choose not to carry a paper, but the government cant step in and say you can't carry this paper.
Parents have every right to choose what their kid sees and does not see, sure dumb parents make dumb choices. And those parents have nobody to blame but themselves when the kids grow up and want nothing to do with them.

excellent answer

but i wonder why they get so lazy and just want to get it banned?which is sort of a paradox because isnt alot easier to tell a child no than it is to march to the whitehouse or local government building holding picket signs and making speeches and forming boycott groups?

[edit on 14-4-2010 by ashanu90]


"Banning" books is against the law. It doesn't happen.

Now, book burnings and such...that isn't parenting. That is religious zeal. Don't confuse the two. They are doing it because it threatens their faith, not because it threatens their children.

"For the children" is just the excuse used to achieve a goal. It happens all the time.



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 11:48 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


well you have a point but there are ways you can keep your kids from being exposed to certain things there are internet porn filters, passwords v chips and most games have family settings now a days

so ay they somehow banned violent videogames there would be riots in the streets and it doesnt solve anything the point is if you dont want your child exposed, then think a. pay attention to them and cut off their connection to harmful content if they are exposed then it is a parents job to explain wat they saw or heard or expierienced and explain why it is not for them



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 11:55 PM
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Originally posted by zaiger
reply to post by ashanu90
 


Its not about their child they do not want anyone's child reading it. It is just a group of people trying to push their beliefs and "standards" on others.

it always sickens me to see thpose kinds of people

[edit on 14-4-2010 by ashanu90]



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 11:55 PM
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Originally posted by ashanu90
reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


well you have a point but there are ways you can keep your kids from being exposed to certain things there are internet porn filters, passwords v chips and most games have family settings now a days

so ay they somehow banned violent videogames there would be riots in the streets and it doesnt solve anything the point is if you dont want your child exposed, then think a. pay attention to them and cut off their connection to harmful content if they are exposed then it is a parents job to explain wat they saw or heard or expierienced and explain why it is not for them


But if they are sitting in study hall at the school library, am i expected to have some sort of filter installed to prevent them from reading something that may not be appropriate for them?

Do you see the point here?

In my household, i push the limit quite a bit. But not all households are the same as me. I think it was stupid to see "Tom Sawyer" and "Huck Finn" removed from schools (it has the "N" bomb in it), but since it offends some (and will only encourage repeating that term by the 4th grade minds that read it), i am not up in arms over it not being in my kids school library.

I will tell you something else: it isn't always about being old fashioned. I am 37. When i was a kid, i used to get sent into the store to by my moms cigarettes for her. No one ever batted an eye. It was common practice. If that happened nowadays, CPS would try to come take your kids away from you.



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 11:58 PM
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Originally posted by bigfatfurrytexan

But if they are sitting in study hall at the school library, am i expected to have some sort of filter installed to prevent them from reading something that may not be appropriate for them?

thats the schools jurisdiction and they have filters in place for that kind of thing



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 12:05 AM
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Originally posted by ashanu90

Originally posted by bigfatfurrytexan

But if they are sitting in study hall at the school library, am i expected to have some sort of filter installed to prevent them from reading something that may not be appropriate for them?

thats the schools jurisdiction and they have filters in place for that kind of thing


and thus, we have now come full circle.

the filters they have in place for that sort of thing starts with someone raising a concern about how appropriate a book is. Since schools in the US are supported with local property tax money, that decision is really left up to the community, and will reflect that values of that community. Lots of bible thumpers? The library will have much more sparse pickings.

Regardless, you are criticizing the very process that you are holding up for me to placate my concerns. Do you not see the failure in this logic? You cannot berate something, and then use the process being berated to allays concerns over what would happen if that process was removed.

Your complaint would seem to be completely unrelated to the article in your OP, as you have just admitted that filtering the materials in student libraries is an effective and appropriate way to prevent them from reading inappropriate material.

Which leads me back to my first post in this thread: this is just a sour grapes rant from an adolescent.



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 12:19 AM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


no you misunderstand me its not about that its about retail i should have mentioned that but i dint think it was important
if the school has filters and parent set limits for their kids thats fine i just still awnt to be able to buy an m rated game without it having to be banned because little jimmys parents assumed that all games are for children then become sadly mistaken and try to keep everyone from buying it. you see?

same with books and movies and whatnot
i can give a # less what community center blocks what.



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 12:20 AM
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reply to post by ashanu90
 



Here's a scenario:

My daughter's school-friend (let's call her Ginny) who lived just around the corner, invited a group of classmates to a birthday-sleepover

I'd met Ginny's parents numerous times at the school -- mornings, afternoons, school clean-ups and working-bees, at other children's daytime birthday parties, in town, etc. I would have signed an affidavit, testifying to their good character, cheerfulness, family-values, etc.

Ginny's father was a member of the Federal Police - polite, conservative, said little

Ginny's mother was popular with everyone. She was extremely friendly, always quick to offer assistance, volunteered at the school tuck-shop. I saw her often at children's sports events. 'Nice' person, devoted to her family, is how I would have described her

So, when Ginny invited my daughter to the sleep-over, I had no qualms about it, particularly as Ginny's house was so close-by and because I'd known that family for several years and trusted they would safeguard my daughter and the other children who'd be sleeping-over

IT wasn't until some years later that my daughter revealed she'd watched several movies classified '15 years and over in the company of an adult' at Ginny's house during the sleep-overs she'd attended there

The movies in question would never cross the threshold of our home, even now. There are certain images which I decline to impose upon my brain. And I would never deliberately subject my children to them. Sure, if they choose to watch such movies as adults, that's their choice. But they don't

Yet Ginny's parents undertook to subject other parents' children to such images. These were young children, being exposed to sick and gory film-content. My daughter told me some of them were crying. They were in someone else's darkened living-room. Their only options were to close their eyes or ask if they could phone their parents to come and collect them. None chose the latter option for fear of appearing 'silly' and 'babyish' before their peers

We'd moved from the area years before my daughter finally confided the situation. My first reaction was one of profound sadness over the fact those little girls, so excited about sleeping-over with their friends, had that garbage tipped into their minds. My next reaction was one of helplessness. I couldn't undo what had been done. And I was gravely disappointed in Ginny's parents -- what had they been thinking ? Had they thought at all ?

Basically, it had been a form of mind-rape. My daughter feels the same

I asked her why Ginny's parents allowed the girls to watch those movies (and there were at least three sleep-overs in that home that I can remember)

She replied that Ginny and her 'best' friend had chosen the movies. My daughter doesn't know if Ginny's parents were even aware of how graphic and disturbing the movies were

As parents, we do our best to ensure our children aren't exposed to inappropriate content. We have our children's best interests at heart. We may impose boundaries re: books, movies, games, etc.

However, we don't keep our children in cages. They spend time with their friends. Other parents may be far less concerned about what their own children read, watch and play. It's fine to say parents have the power to vet content to which their children are exposed in their own home. But that's not the whole story, is it ?



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