Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

Eyjafjallajökull Caldera Eruption

page: 6
91
<< 3  4  5    7  8  9 >>

log in

join

posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 10:10 AM
link   




posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 10:16 AM
link   
reply to post by derekvli
 


I'm 25 miles north (ish) of London, and I can't see any volcanic ash. I'm going to have to top my windscreen wash up, it ran out 2 weeks ago and I've been too lazy to sort it. Looks like I'm going to have to if this all comes down on us



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 10:18 AM
link   
Iceland: Dear UK heres the ash your requested for that Icesave claim.
UK: WTF Iceland?!? Why did you send us volcanic ash ? Our airspace has shut down.
Iceland: What ? It's what you asked for isn't it ?
UK: NO! Cash! Cash you dyslexic #. CASH!
Iceland: Oh, did you mean cash. We don't have C in the Icelandic alphabet, so when you ask for Cash, all you get is Ash!

This joke is going like fire on facebook and twitter here in iceland

I was one of the lucky ones that got to see the first eruption on Fimmvörðuháls
www.flickr.com... - some photos I took.

I'm in Reykjavík the capital and we are not worried about the ash as the wind is blowing east but people who live there have to wear masks so the ash doesn't go to their lungs.
www.facebook.com... - here is a photo that was taken this morning, it should be bright and sunny but it's dark like night because of the ash.

They say that this is a small eruption, if Katla goes off like it has done following Eyjafjallajökull (i have been laughing because people don't know how to pronounce this and think that someone just picked their head ad the keyboard but it is translated island (eyja)-maintain (fjalla)-glacier (jökull) because you can see to the island Vestmanneyjar (erupted in 1973, you should google that eruption!) from this glacier) then we have much bigger problem on our hands.



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 10:38 AM
link   
Thanks for all the great pictures.

I guess that movie "How to Train Your Dragon" really pissed off that really big dragon.

If anyone gets any pictures of her, please post.



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 10:40 AM
link   
reply to post by skjerulf
 


Absolutely incredible photos!!! Thank you SOOO Much for sharing them!!!! Please stay safe and keep us in the loop. Thank you again.



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 10:57 AM
link   
reply to post by ressiv
 


en.vedur.is...


No-fly zone:
www.metoffice.gov.uk...

[edit on 15-4-2010 by Rev.Fenrir]



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 11:12 AM
link   
reply to post by Rev.Fenrir
 

thanks:-)
here is an airtraffic monitor of holland place mouse on an plan for details...

www.geluidsnet.nl...



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 11:17 AM
link   
www.ruv.is...

really dirty fuzzy cam there, some water just spluttered on to the camera i think

EDIT: definetly just seen some water splutter into mid centre of camera, it's really misty, i think this is hekla?

[edit on 15-4-2010 by Mr Zeropoint]



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 11:28 AM
link   
Here is a hazy Katla cam

Yes, above is Helka - see the little writing in the lower left hand corner

[edit on 15-4-2010 by Anmarie96]



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 11:38 AM
link   
aye, im looking at that Katla cam to, it's strange, just as i looked away, the camera switched, somebody must monitor these cameras constantly.



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 11:41 AM
link   
If the eruption continues in this rhythm the climate change will be global.
scienceblogs.com...
There is a pretty suggestive image from Nasa with clouds of ash.
A norwegian climate researcher says that "This is not like Pinatubo. So far the scale is not big enough to have a global effect". However the potential is there.
www.msnbc.msn.com...



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 11:47 AM
link   
reply to post by skjerulf
 

Outstanding photos!
Is the ash interfering with cell phones or radio/tv signals?



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 11:51 AM
link   
The land is transforming. From the beginning of 2010, frequent earthquakes (not as much in the last month), floods in Europe, odd freaking weather in the US, good weather in Canada (yes, I say good because of their lack of snowfall in some parts) and now this volcano that's halted air travel between the West and Europe.

The world's trying to tell us something. I think it's telling us "I'm still pissed no matter how many trees you plant now."



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 12:22 PM
link   
don't know to much bout volcanoes but
www.simnet.is...

does it not look like the amplitude of the sesmic activity in and around Hekla have increased in the last couple of hours?, (bottom graph).

I need to find something better to do with my time!



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 12:23 PM
link   
hekla seems veryyyy active last 3 hours

www.simnet.is...



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 12:31 PM
link   
reply to post by Cherryontop
 


No it's not, no problems. I live right next to the main airport and airplanes have been flying all day and it looks like that the main flight road in iceland is still open, between Akureyri and Reykjavik.



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 01:29 PM
link   
The Guardian

Interesting article about the effects of the erruption of Laki in 1783.



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 02:27 PM
link   
Situation Update No. 17


this sounds like a huge bummer


On 15.04.2010 at 16:56 GMT+2

After lying dormant for more than two centuries the Eyjafjallajoekull volcano in Iceland has now erupted twice in a month, bringing chaos to northern Europe and destruction to its surroundings. Last night's eruption under a glacier, which spewed massive clouds of ash miles into the sky, was 10 to 20 times more powerful than the one last month, scientists said. But disruption could last for weeks because the volcano's last eruption lasted two years from 1821 to 1823. Today's caused local rivers to rise by up to 10 feet as the ferocious heat melted the glacier, turning it to water which gushed down the mountain. Iceland's main coastal ring road was closed near the volcano, and workers smashed three holes in the highway to give the rushing water a clear route to the coast and prevent bridges from being swept away. Emergency workers rescued scores of tourists from around the glacier as it spewed smoke and steam. Forecasters said Londoners will have an astonishing sunset tonight due to the Icelandic eruption. The Met Office said a vivid “volcanic lavender” sunset was likely. Eruptions create what experts call a “volcanic aerosol” — a colourful mixture of ash and sulphur compounds — in the stratosphere.

This scatters an invisible blue glow which, when mixed with the red light of the setting sun, produces a vivid crimson and violet hue. The eruption could affect the UK until early next week, and cause changes to temperatures across Europe. “The problem is that we have an area of high pressure, which is pushing the cloud from Iceland directly over Britain,” said Brendan Jones of MeteoGroup. “That will not change until early next week, so as long as the volcano keeps erupting, we will have the ash cloud.” At 11am, the ash cloud was at around 20,000 feet and Mr Jones confirmed Britain was unlikely to see much of it because the ash is so diluted. The most noticeable effect is likely to be at sunrise and sunset, when the particles are illuminated. “The sky isn't going to go dark, and its unlikely we will see any deposits at all on the ground.” However, Mr Jones said previous eruptions have caused major problems. “If you look back in history there have been some periods where the weather has been changed by big volcanic eruptions like Mount Tambora and Mount St Helens.” In 1815 a huge eruption by Mount Tambora on the Indonesian island of Sumbawa spewed out massive amounts of sulphur dioxide which combined with water vapour to form a sulphuric acid mist that reflected sunlight away from the earth. That caused such a drop in temperatures that 1816 became known as “the year with no summer”.



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 03:17 PM
link   
I really hope this does not affect our summer because that was one heck of a brutal winter.

Does anyone else find it odd that we had a huge fireball over the midwest (U.S.) at the same time this monster was exploding?



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 03:35 PM
link   
Hi people there is a lot of a strange feeling going round and I admit that, but as of now, don't worry too much. Eyjafjallajokull is still too small to really screw up the world. It did not the last times it went, why would it now? If the plume is countinus going strong for some weeks, then maybe it is time to worry. In the moment I would say don't worry.









 
91
<< 3  4  5    7  8  9 >>

log in

join