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Psychics - you may not like this......

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posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 12:09 PM
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......but then you already knew that didn't you?



Early History

Psychics have gone by many different names throughout history, in ancient history they were considered prophets or seers. In more modern times there are a myriad of different labels for people with psychic abilities - clairvoyant, mystic, spiritualist, telepathics, oracles or mediums.

In early civilizations they were important figures within any given culture or society, often serving as advisors, priests, and judges to some of the most powerful leaders of the time.

There are instances of psychic abilities recorded within The Bible and Greek literature is also littered with references to psychic prophecies, with the Delphic Oracle being a more famous example.

Spiritualist Movement

In the 19th Century Spiritualism was brought to the masses. As a result of the claims of three sisters, the Fox sisters, this movement would go on to claim at its peak up to 8 million followers, mostly from the middle and upper classes.

The sisters claimed that they were psychic mediums with the ability to speak to the dead whilst in a trance like state. Besides these "message mediums", they were also practitioners who could produce physical phenomena that was said to be the work of the spirits. This phenomena included lights, unearthly music, the levitation of objects, disembodied voices and even actual apparitions.

However, after many years of profiting from these professed special abilities Maggie Fox, whilst at an all time low after drinking away her fortune, confessed it was all pure trickery.


In 1888, Maggie made the infamous appearance when she denounced Spiritualism as a total sham. The years of alcohol abuse, loneliness and grief had taken their toll on her and she weighed the idea of committing suicide before finally choosing confession instead. She booked the stage at the New York Academy of Music and walked out on stage to announce she and Kate had created the strange rappings heard in their Hydesville home by simply cracking their toes. She also stated that Leah had forced them into performing as mediums for the public. "I have seen so much miserable deception," she reportedly said. "That is why I am willing to state that Spiritualism is a fraud of the worst description." Sitting in a box overlooking the stage, Kate silently affirmed her sister's confession.


It seems that the confession was too little too late, for the damage had been done. Still over 100 years later psychics and mediums are doing a brisk trade, convincing innocent, vulnerable people that they are receiving messages from the 'other side'...and charging a pretty sum for the pleasure of doing so.

These days there are no wires, illusions or cracking of bones but just simple psychological tools of manipulation.

Cold Reading - Wikipedia (source)


Before starting the actual reading, the reader will typically try to elicit cooperation from the subject, saying something such as, "I often see images that are a bit unclear and which may sometimes mean more to you than to me; if you help, we can together uncover new things about you." One of the most crucial elements of a convincing cold reading is a subject eager to make connections or reinterpret vague statements in any way that will help the reader appear to have made specific predictions or intuitions. While the reader will do most of the talking, it is the subject who provides the meaning.

After determining that the subject is cooperative, the reader will make a number of probing statements or questions, typically using variations of the methods noted below. The subject will then reveal further information with their replies (whether verbal or non-verbal) and the cold reader can continue from there, pursuing promising lines of inquiry and very quickly abandoning or avoiding unproductive ones. In general, while much information seems to come from the reader, most of the facts and statements come from the subject, which are then refined and restated by the reader so as to reinforce the idea that the reader got something correct.

Even very subtle cues such as changes in facial expression or body language can indicate if a particular line of questioning is effective or not. Combining the techniques of cold reading with information obtained covertly (also called "hot reading") can leave a strong impression that the reader knows or has access to a great deal of information about the subject. Because the majority of time during a reading is spent dwelling on the "hits" the reader is able to obtain, while the time spent recognizing "misses" is minimized, the effect is to give an impression that the cold reader knows far more about the subject than any ordinary stranger could.


One of the key points to cold reading is that the psychic will do the vast majority of the talking, often quickly and without giving the subject much time to take it all in fully.

"In the course of a successful reading, the psychic may provide most of the words, but it is the client that provides most of the meaning and all of the significance." - Ian Rowland

How to Cold Read

Shotgunning


"Shotgunning" is a commonly-used cold reading technique used, among others, by television psychics and spiritual mediums. The psychic or reader slowly offers a huge quantity of very general information, often to an entire audience (some of which is very likely to be correct, near correct or at the very least, provocative or evocative to someone present), observes their subjects' reactions (especially their body language), and then narrows the scope, acknowledging particular people or concepts and refining the original statements according to those reactions to promote an emotional response.

Shotgunning might include a series of vague statements such as:
* "I see a heart problem with a father-figure in your family, a father, a grandfather, an uncle, a cousin... I'm definitively seeing chest pain here for a father-figure in your family."
* "I see a woman that isn't a blood relative. Someone around when you were growing up, an aunt, a friend of your mother, a stepmother with blackness in the chest, lung cancer, heart disease, breast cancer..."
* "I sense an older male figure in your life, who wants you to know whilst you may have had disagreements in your life, he still loved you."


This method is a favourite of television psychic mediums such as John Edward. One of the biggest problems of psychics on television is how deceptive the whole process can be. When condensed into a 30 minute show and combined with clever editing almost anyone could be shown as a successful medium. Edwards has his critics in this regard:


Critics of Edward assert he performs the mentalist technique of cold reading. Choosing the first reading from a two hour tape of edited shows as a sample, magician and skeptic James Randi found that just three of twenty three statements made by Edward were confirmed as correct by the audience member being read, and the three statements that were correct were also trivial and nondescript.


When Edwards was accused of using hot reading (the use of foreknowledge to perform a reading) James Underdown of the Skeptical Inquirer attended a Crossing Over show to test these claims for himself. While he found that "there were no indications of anyone I saw collecting information... none of his readings contained the kind of specific information that would raise an eyebrow of suspicion" he did state that "John Edward was a bad cold reader. He, too, struggled to get hits, and in one attempt shot off nearly forty guesses before finding any significant targets."


Underdown attributed a great deal of Edward's accuracy on television to editing and wrote, "Edward's editor fine-tuned many of the dead-ends out of a reading riddled with misses." In 2002, Edward said, "People are in the studio for eight hours, and we have to edit the show for time, not content. We don't try to hide the 'misses'."





The Rainbow Ruse


The rainbow ruse is a crafted statement which simultaneously awards the subject with a specific personality trait, as well as the opposite of that trait. With such a phrase, a cold reader can "cover all possibilities" and appear to have made an accurate deduction in the mind of the subject, despite the fact that a rainbow ruse statement is vague and contradictory. This technique is used since personality traits are not quantifiable, and also because nearly everybody has experienced both sides of a particular emotion at some time in their lives.

Statements of this type might include:

* "Most of the time you are positive and cheerful, but there has been a time in the past when you were very upset."
* "You are a very kind and considerate person, but when somebody does something to break your trust, you feel deep-seated anger."
* "I would say that you are mostly shy and quiet, but when the mood strikes you, you can easily become the center of attention." A cold reader can choose from a variety of personality traits, think of its opposite, and then bind the two together in a phrase, vaguely linked by factors such as mood, time, or potential.


This is all made possible by something called the Barnum Effect, named after the showman, businessman, and entertainer P.T. Barnum - the man who coined the phrase "There's a sucker born every minute" and stated that "we've got something for everyone."




posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 12:10 PM
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"Barnum statements" are statements that seem personal, yet apply to many people. And while seemingly specific, such statements are often open-ended or give the reader the maximum amount of "wiggle room" in a reading. They are designed to elicit identifying responses from people.

A talented and charismatic reader can sometimes even bully a subject into admitting a connection, demanding over and over that they acknowledge a particular statement as having some relevance and maintaining that they just aren't thinking hard enough, or are repressing some important memory.

Statements of this type might include:

* "I sense that you are sometimes insecure, especially with people you don't know very well."
* "You have a box of old unsorted photographs in your house."
* "You had an accident when you were a child involving water."
* "You're having problems with a friend or relative."
* "Your father passed on due to problems in his chest or abdomen."


Anyone well versed in these techniques can mascaraed as having psychic abilities. Those who have a particular skill or talent for such techniques are the ones we see on television or hear on the radio, profiting from the gullible and taking advantage of the vulnerable.

So the next time you find yourself considering to take part in a psychic reading remember P.T. Barnums famous words, "There's a sucker born every minute."

Don't be a sucker.



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 12:16 PM
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nice thread.


reminds me a lot of this picture






posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 12:18 PM
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Ahh, this reminds me of a South Park Episode from back in the day.

Cartman's Incredible Gift

Watch the Psychic fight, best thing ever.

Don't be suckered folk
.

~Keeper


+4 more 
posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 12:50 PM
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Sadly there are more shams than true psychics in the world. However being on the other end of it (experiencing being a psychic myself as a young child) there are certainly true ones out there. Many of them still continue their gifts into their adulthood, but I didn't, it just went away at some point in my development.
It's sad to state in the OP this as a cold hard fact when there are and were documented cases of psychic ability. Edgar Cayce is well known, what made him so beleivable? He never once asked for or even accepted payment for his abilities, and most true psychics won't. As it is a gift, it's something to be shared with the world.

Very good post anyway. I just thought I would give my perspective on it, being one who experienced the gift. And I don't really have any proof as all whom I have told of these things were by mouth and none of them (that I know of) go on ATS. I can give examples, but they'd just be shot down as BS from non beleivers, so...you know. That's the way it is I guess.

[edit on 11-4-2010 by ldyserenity]



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 01:51 PM
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phsycics have the ability to talk telepathicaly once you can do that you can call in your self, 2 years later, to see your future, ask the future the right questions see what happens, the world doesnt die ive seen till 2039

plus ive talked to notradamus i showeed him and image of the flying pig man(man in a jet) and told him about the two towers crashing, boo yea i own like King you can call me king tut i really am

[edit on 11-4-2010 by BirDMan_X]



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 02:24 PM
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But there's always the exception (to the claims all psychics are fakes)

And it only takes one


A children's party. I was helping the hostess. Was drying dishes. Looked out of the window. Saw a little girl riding a tricycle down the middle of the road. Told the hostess. We dropped what we were doing and dashed outside for the child. Somehow, she'd evaded several parents who were supervising a dozen or so children playing in the fenced yard

Half an hour later, parents began arriving to collect their children from the party. One of the mothers told a group of us that she'd been to a psychic -- who'd told her -- ' You have a little girl. I see her riding a tricycle on the road'

The mother replied, ' Oh no. My daughter's not allowed on the road. Anyway, she's at a birthday party'

Psychic said, ' She's aged about 5. She's wearing a pink spotted dress with a frill at the hem. Her hair's in pig-tails with pink ribbons. She has red shoes on. She's on a little green tricycle and she's riding on a road ' (and approximation of the conversation between the two

After telling us this, the girl's mother laughed, expecting us to laugh with her. She clearly believed the psychic had been completely wrong

I could see the hostess struggling with her conscience. Finally she admitted to the mother that the girl had somehow made her way out onto the road and had been riding the tricycle (which belonged to the hostess' son)

The little girl's mother's face dropped and she said, 'Oh no. I thought she was wrong about Belinda (her daughter, who'd been on the tricycle). But if she was right about that, then she might have been right about the other things she told me'

She went on to say that the psychic had said her mother would die before Christmas. Also that she was pregnant and would have a son

She'd recently separated from her husband, she said. So there was no way she'd be having another child. And her mother was perfectly healthy

We said what she wanted to hear, i.e., that the psychic had simply made a lucky guess about Belinda being on the tricycle. Just a coincidence. No need to worry about the other things the psychic had told her, we said. Psychics just make things up. What they say never happens

Not long afterwards, I bumped into the woman who'd hosted the birthday party and during our chat she asked if I'd heard about the woman who'd gone to the psychic. No, I hadn't. She said the woman's mother was very ill, with cancer. Also, that the woman and her husband had decided to give their marriage another try because they'd learned they were to become parents again

About a year later, I bumped into the woman (the one who'd been to the psychic) in a bookshop, and learned she'd had a baby boy since last time I saw her, also that her mother had died

By this time, the psychic's name and reputation had spread. A woman I saw occasionally dropped-in for a visit and said she'd made an appointment to see the psychic later that day. She asked if I'd go with her. Curious, I agreed

When we arrived, the psychic was not at all as I'd expected. No crystals or bead curtains. She was an ex-model. The walls were filled with professional glamour photos featuring herself. She was still very attractive. A bit aloof. Checked her appearance in mirrors several times. Talked about her career and about living the US with her former husband. Seemed preoccupied with her own affairs. Said she had to go shopping and collect her children from school later. Complained about some item which the dry-cleaners had lost, etc.

I took a seat on the couch as the psychic commenced my friend's 'reading'. It sounded fairly boring to me. The psychic's cat appeared from nowhere and jumped up, sat on my knees. I wasn't a cat person. Tried politely to make it go away, but it wouldn't. I gave it a 'go away' stare. It stared back. I must have fallen asleep, which surprised me when I woke up, because I hadn't felt particularly tired. The psychic and my friend were still talking and shortly afterwards, the 'reading' concluded

My friend pressed me to 'have a turn'. Didn't want to, but felt it rude to protest too strongly

Decided I wasn't going to make it easy for the psychic. Did all the things they say you shouldn't do: crossed my ankles and kept my hands under the table so I could cross those, too

She'd pushed a pack of ordinary playing cards toward me and told me to pick several and lay them in a certain order. I can't remember the details

Kept my face impassive and didn't indicate 'yes' or 'no' at anything the psychic said. Some of what she said was quite accurate

Then -- only five or so minutes into the session, the psychic got up suddenly. She pushed all 'my' cards into a heap, messed them all up before walking away. Yet my friend's 'reading' had lasted about half an hour

Surprised, I laughed and asked why she'd done that. ' That's my future you just obliterated', I said. Still walking away down the short hallway, she called back, ' I'm glad it's not my future

My friend and I exchanged raised-eyebrow looks. Soon, the psychic returned, munching on a diet cracker and asked if we'd like coffee. As we drank it, I asked the psychic how shd 'did it'. Did she hear voices, I asked ? Did she see visions ? The playing cards we'd selected -- what did they mean to her -- what was their role ? Had she always been a psychic ?

She shrugged and I could tell the subject didn't interest her. Then she said she hadn't been conducting psychic readings for very long. Not long after becoming divorced and returning from the US, she'd gone to a party where some of the guests had played a game and had taken turns at pretending to be psychic. When it was her turn, she'd said the first thing that popped into her head. A few weeks later, some of the things she'd said had happened in the lives of some of the guests

She was broke and finding it difficult to find work that coincided with her children's hours at school. Some of her friends had suggested she place an advertisement in the local paper, offering to conduct psychic reading for a few dollars. She hadn't believed anyone would respond, but they had

In the beginning, she said, she'd told people everything she could. For example, she'd told people if she saw death and had given them all the details. She'd told one middle aged woman that her husband was planning to leave her and had been systematically withdrawing money from their joint accounts. Later, some of these had contacted her to say she'd been correct, much as they wished otherwise. Now they wanted further information

This had led to the psychic being contacted by 'professional' psychics who'd strongly advised her not to give people such direct information. She should not tell people they or a loved one was going to die, for example. Instead, she should advise that they or the loved one would be wise to be 'careful of their health' or should perhaps see a doctor for a check up

The psychic said she was still learning the ropes. And when I again asked her how she gained her information (voices, visions, whatever) she shrugged boredly. An unenthusiastic psychic. Or maybe she'd been told by the 'professionals' not to give away trade secrets

Her predictions re: my friend's future turned out to be unsettlingly accurate. I know this, because some of them involved me, via a third party who was unknown to me when we'd visted the psychic. The predicted events claimed the next 17 years of my life

A year or so after the visit to the psychic, I was invited to a party at the home of friends. To my surprise, the psychic was amongst the guests. She didn't recognise me, so I didn't mention we'd met previously. She was as vague as before and spent the next five minutes talking anxiously about some sheepskin rugs she'd washed and which didn't seem to have retained their former softness

After escaping and while chatting with my friend the hotess, I learned the psychic was in very hot demand and was now quite expensive. Apparently, several politicians and leading celebrities consulted with her and the acting Prime Minister flew interstate specifically for 'readings'

That was the last occasion I saw the psychic. The future events she predicted were of a kind which could not have been drawn from either my friend or myself via telepathy or facial expression or other. Neither my friend nor I possessed the information. It wasn't in our heads to be extracted. The third party was not in possession of the information either. And the third party and I had not met and were highly unlikely to ever meet. If someone can explain how an ex-model, novice-psychic was able to 'see' such an improbable future, I'd be grateful



[edit on 11-4-2010 by Dock9]

[edit on 11-4-2010 by Dock9]



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 02:28 PM
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interesting but on the other hand you cannot deny that there is smthng more than deception in the whole process



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 02:39 PM
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Originally posted by tothetenthpower
Ahh, this reminds me of a South Park Episode from back in the day.

Cartman's Incredible Gift

Watch the Psychic fight, best thing ever.

Don't be suckered folk
.

~Keeper


i love south park and don't remember that episode off hand, but i just have one question. Why would you send a link to that crazy site with chinese subs when you can just link to southparkstudios.com and watch the episode in high quality. I hope you know that every episode is available on their website.

as for the OP, the oracle at Delphi is really interesting. I will have to look through my "Secret Teachings of All Ages" to read more about this!



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 02:47 PM
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Originally posted by Marsel
interesting but on the other hand you cannot deny that there is smthng more than deception in the whole process


As the old adage goes, I'll believe in psychic powers when one of them guesses the lottery numbers. Anyone who claims they are a "true psychic" is welcome to take Randi's million dollar challenge and prove psychic abilities to the world once and for all.



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 02:49 PM
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Yes, greed and deception seem inate to the human animal.

And I am delusional enough to believe that I, at least, would prefer a rational explanation for some of my experiences.


Perhaps you can provide an alternate basis for the following incidence?




At a resturant I'd never been to before, as the guest of a friend, I am introduced to a group of self-proclaimed "psychics"; a half dozen or so ladies of "indeterminate age" (a diplomatic way of saying that the 'spring' had long left the 'chicken'). Eager to prove themselves to a new (potential customer?) audience (me), they proceded to call over one of the bus boys. Apparently, at least one of the ladies was a regular at the establishment and the employee was familiar enough with with her that he willing allowed her to hold his wallet while he briefly attended to another table.


The "ladies" then attempted to discern certain facts about the busboy's life by means of "psychometry", psychicly interpeting the images "imprinted" on a object by its owner's "soul" (?), while passing the wallet, unopened amoung themselves.

As one would expect, various generalities were profered, none that would suprise a rookie detective.

However, one matron, the most senior and (and financially successful) of the group declared that she felt "something 'hot" in the wallet, by which she went on to say, that she felt it was significantly more importance than the rest of the wallet's contents. Well duh!



Then she handed the wallet to me. As a challenge I suppose; at least that is what it felt like.


I took the wallet in hand. Made sure to hold it in plain sight of everyone at the table, without opening it, and closed my eyes. To my suprise, I got the impression of being on a motorcycle, in bright daylight, on a two lane road in the foothills. There was a ditch to my right, beyond that a barbed wire fence, beyond which the ground rose to a low hill covered in dry grass.

I also got an impression of a slip of yellow paper, like legal pad paper, with a number sequence written on it in dark ink, blue or black, in the wallet.


"Madam Seer" called the busboy over and asked if we could look in his wallet. He agreed. At first there was just the usual assortment of bills, credit cards and business cards. The guy was a bit of a pack rat.

Then, as Ms. Mystic pulled out some of the business cards the guy had collected, a slip of yellow paper fell to the table, on which a phone number was written in black felt pen.

Ladies are abuzz. Ms. Mystic asks busboy whose number? Busboy, looks at number, and with a bit of suprise on his face, says its the phone number for an old girlfriend. Says he thought he'd lost the number months ago.

Dude, clean out your wallet once in a while!


Noticing that he was walking with a slight limp, I asked him about his leg, how did he hurt it?

Apparently he had taken a spill on his motorcycle a couple of years earlier when he hit a section of loose gravel on a back country road; multiple fractures to his left femur. Ouch!



I make no claims, beyond the obvious. This isn't the only instance of "wierdness" I've experienced. I certainly do not charge for anything "arcane"; though my employer does pay me to interpet tax law as part of my regular duties.





The human tapestry is large, but it is the individual threads that make it whole. Don't be too quick to dismiss the threads for sake of the larger picture.



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 02:50 PM
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You will find that alot of governments use people, that they claim are this.

end of.....



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 02:50 PM
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You will find that alot of governments use people, that they claim are this.

end of.....



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 02:52 PM
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Why aren't most psychics billionaires? I would be.



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 02:54 PM
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Originally posted by traditionaldrummer

Originally posted by Marsel
interesting but on the other hand you cannot deny that there is smthng more than deception in the whole process


As the old adage goes, I'll believe in psychic powers when one of them guesses the lottery numbers. Anyone who claims they are a "true psychic" is welcome to take Randi's million dollar challenge and prove psychic abilities to the world once and for all.


Randis challenge is there to find people, so the government can use them.

Stay away.

Lottery things are a waste, and if your truly spiritual you would find the idea of money rubbish. Do you people not understand how dangerous it is to win a lottery, lol.

People would kill you over 10p in the street. People are obsessed with money.

Winning lottery is serious danger.

Of course you people have not thought of that lol.



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 03:01 PM
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All humans have psychic abilities, but the great majority don't know how to develop them for they have not discovered the inner workings of the mind. Also, one must know for sure that he is in fact multi-dimensional.

I've discovered, through personal experience, that I can tap into knowledge which is not part of the human race memory, in other words, non-manipulated telepathy with the source. I call this process "inner knowing". Other people may have different names for this process, but it's the best one i can give to describe it.

LiveForever8, i often follow your threads for they contain very good information. Thanks.

[edit on 11-4-2010 by lagenese]



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 03:15 PM
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Originally posted by lagenese
All humans have psychic abilities, but the great majority don't know how to develop them


Everyone uses them every day.

Its why rich think they are better, as they think they have better mind and made it because they have this sort of ability they can control.

Plus no one on earth should do the lottery, if you win your life is in danger. I never do it, and never will.

Why do you people never think about consequences of these things.

Have you also seen how many people just talk to people because of money. Its like flies round sh1t.

You meet teh worst people, if they think you have money and i have absolutely nothing, but people thought i did and they decided they would destroy my life.

Flies round sh1t.

Remember that saying.



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 03:22 PM
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I decided that I had to post to this thread given the fact that I do agree with many of the things posted by the OP.

First off, I have been a 'sensitive' since the age of 3. Not once in my 27 years on this planet have I taken a dime for any reading that I do. I do believe that there are people out there that do have an innate ability to be psychic. I have done years of independent research on people who claim to be "psychic" and most of them were hacks, frauds, and the like. I have been hooked up to an EEG machine twice while being studied by a friend of mine who is working on his PhD in psychology. I accurately described to him several different shapes, colors, etc. that were on cards being held in a separate room. The EEG machine showed abnormal activity while I was performing these readings, and while I don't understand all of the medical jargon used (I'm a musician afterall), he said that the results were interesting, yet inconclusive.

There are things out there people, that science cannot explain through current methods. I think that there are enough frauds out there that scam people out of their money, that they give us true sensitives a very bad name, and lead us to being ostracized, ridiculed, etc.

Here is the link to the James Randi Foundation, which is the foundation that has the million dollar challenge (which someone brought up):

www.randi.org...

Rule 12:

12. This offer is not open to any and all persons. Before being considered as an applicant, the person applying must satisfy two conditions: First, he/she must have a “media presence,” which means having been published, written about, or known to the media in regard to his/her claimed abilities or powers. This can be established by producing articles, videos, books, or other published material that specifically addresses the person’s abilities. Second, he/she must produce at least one signed document from an academic who has witnessed the powers or abilities of the person, and will validate that these powers or abilities have been verified.


That would rule out most of the people in the world that have abilities yet do not care to make their presence known through public means.

I think this is to scare the fake psychics out there that would otherwise con people out of their money. I despise the fakers. Taking people's money by playing on their most sensitive, personal matters is ridiculous.

But I digress.


I have done numerous readings over the years, and I aim for accuracy and for details...none of this "someone in the audience's mother, grandmother, aunt, niece, sister, etc has the first letter in their name of M, and they died." John Edwards is a jerk and a fake, as well as Sylvia Brown, and any of those people that choose to make a buck off of someone else's gullibility.

I have not had a complaint yet, and when I do have a reading with someone, I am usually accurate about 9/10 times.

As far as I am concerned, there are varying degrees of psychic ability. Some may just be able to predict who is calling on the telephone, and some, like me, can see details about someone's life, about passed loved ones, etc.

As far as lottery numbers, well, you're right whoever said it, if we could predict those numbers, we would be millionaires. I don't think that it works that way, however...at least not in my experience.

Thank you for the interesting facts, OP, and hopefully people will be more careful with their money when someone who claims to be "psychic" comes asking for it to give a reading.


Peace be with you.

-truthseeker



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 03:35 PM
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Originally posted by andy1033

Originally posted by traditionaldrummer

Originally posted by Marsel
interesting but on the other hand you cannot deny that there is smthng more than deception in the whole process


As the old adage goes, I'll believe in psychic powers when one of them guesses the lottery numbers. Anyone who claims they are a "true psychic" is welcome to take Randi's million dollar challenge and prove psychic abilities to the world once and for all.


Randis challenge is there to find people, so the government can use them.

Stay away.

Lottery things are a waste, and if your truly spiritual you would find the idea of money rubbish. Do you people not understand how dangerous it is to win a lottery, lol.

People would kill you over 10p in the street. People are obsessed with money.

Winning lottery is serious danger.

Of course you people have not thought of that lol.


Ahh. I see.

The challenge is a government rouse, and presumably Randi must be an agent of sorts.

And, the lottery is super ultra mega dangerous.

Therefore, psychics are real?

Wow. Just wow.



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 04:07 PM
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Originally posted by traditionaldrummer
Ahh. I see.

The challenge is a government rouse, and presumably Randi must be an agent of sorts.

And, the lottery is super ultra mega dangerous.

Therefore, psychics are real?

Wow. Just wow.


Do you know that lottery winners have to go into hiding, and protect there families all there lifes. Who in there right mind would want to do that.

Also you will find it is dangerous for governments to find out info about people. They are always using people.

Randi challenge is just for the government. No one wins period, does not matter who you are.



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