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News - 7.1 Solomons Earthquake Sunday, April 11, 2010

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posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 05:07 AM
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7.1
Date-Time Sunday, April 11, 2010 at 09:40:29 UTC
Sunday, April 11, 2010 at 08:40:29 PM at epicenter

Location 10.925°S, 161.191°E
Depth 51.9 km (32.3 miles) set by location program
Region SOLOMON ISLANDS
Distances 97 km (60 miles) WSW (237°) from Kira Kira, Solomon Islands
211 km (131 miles) SE (140°) from HONIARA, Solomon Islands
248 km (154 miles) SSE (168°) from Auki, Solomon Islands
1540 km (957 miles) E (97°) from PORT MORESBY, Papua New Guinea


[edit on 11/4/10 by troubleshooter]

[edit on 11/4/10 by troubleshooter]




posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 05:21 AM
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Seems like the trend is still there .... as per my thread and prediction
EARTHQUAKES: An analysis indicating increasing frequency and severity
www.abovetopsecret.com...






Looking at the above summary, it is plainly obvious that overall, earthquake activity was on a gradual decline in the decades prior to 1990 but then unexpectedly, in the year 1991, some kind of 'tipping point' was reached and the number and intensity of subsequent earthquakes in all magnitude ranges began a steady and statistically significant increase.
Amalgamating all the data from the 3 magnitude ranges still shows a consistent and undeniable trend of increasing earthquake activity as is obvious in the overall increase of 38%.


So, can we conclude that the 'feelings' and 'impressions' that many ATS members have regarding significant increases in earthquake activity is justified ?
From the above analysis, it appears that we can conclude that there is indeed strong justification for such a belief.



PREDICTION

Based on the observed trends, it is more than likely that earthquake activity will continue to increase over time and that based on the above clearly observed trends, the greater proportion of future major earthquake events will be seen to occur primarily within the 6.0 to 6.9 magnitude range. However, it would also appear that we will be seeing increasing numbers of events also occurring within the 7.0 to 7.9 and 8.0 and higher magnitude ranges, compared to what were observed to have happened in past decades.



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 05:24 AM
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reply to post by troubleshooter
 

ABC online...

www.abc.net.au...

Magnitude 7.1 quake hits Solomon Islands

A major quake of magnitude 7.1 struck the Solomon Islands on Sunday, the US Geological Survey reported.

It said the quake's epicentre was 52 km deep, 97 km southwest of the Solomon Islands' Kira Kira in the Pacific Ocean. It hit at 8:40 pm local time.

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Centre said the quake, initially reported as a magnitude 7.5, could "generate local tsunamis that can be destructive along coasts located within 100 kilometers of the earthquake epicentre."

A magnitude 7.1 quake can cause widespread, heavy damage.

More to follow.

- Reuters

[edit on 11/4/10 by troubleshooter]



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 05:32 AM
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reply to post by troubleshooter
 

The Australian
www.theaustralian.com.au...

7.1 magnitude quake strikes Solomons From correspondents in Honiara From: AFP April 11, 2010 8:26PM

A MAJOR, 7.1-magnitude earthquake has struck near the Solomon Islands, the US Geological Survey says, but there is no immediate tsunami alert or report of damage.

The quake struck at a depth of 52km with an epicentre 97km southwest of Kira Kira on Makira Island, the USGS said today.



[edit on 11/4/10 by troubleshooter]



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 05:49 AM
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reply to post by troubleshooter
 

Coincidently Channel 7 Sunday Night program ran a report tonight called Vanuatu: Ring of Fire.

au.tv.yahoo.com...

This covered the increased volcanic/earthquake activity in the region...
...and the potential threat to mainland Australia.



[edit on 11/4/10 by troubleshooter]



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 05:52 AM
link   

Originally posted by tauristercus
Seems like the trend is still there .... as per my thread and prediction
EARTHQUAKES: An analysis indicating increasing frequency and severity
www.abovetopsecret.com...






Looking at the above summary, it is plainly obvious that overall, earthquake activity was on a gradual decline in the decades prior to 1990 but then unexpectedly, in the year 1991, some kind of 'tipping point' was reached and the number and intensity of subsequent earthquakes in all magnitude ranges began a steady and statistically significant increase.
Amalgamating all the data from the 3 magnitude ranges still shows a consistent and undeniable trend of increasing earthquake activity as is obvious in the overall increase of 38%.


So, can we conclude that the 'feelings' and 'impressions' that many ATS members have regarding significant increases in earthquake activity is justified ?
From the above analysis, it appears that we can conclude that there is indeed strong justification for such a belief.



PREDICTION

Based on the observed trends, it is more than likely that earthquake activity will continue to increase over time and that based on the above clearly observed trends, the greater proportion of future major earthquake events will be seen to occur primarily within the 6.0 to 6.9 magnitude range. However, it would also appear that we will be seeing increasing numbers of events also occurring within the 7.0 to 7.9 and 8.0 and higher magnitude ranges, compared to what were observed to have happened in past decades.



Complete and utter nonsense unless you weight those figures to adjust for an increase of 3000+ seismographs over the period which will have picked up more quakes. Your own graph shows that with the jump between the 80s and 90s

In addition this spread is far too large. A 9.0 mms quake is 31623 times larger than a 6.0 mms quake so lumping all these together is really not very scientific.

For your information the installation rate of seismographs has been as per this post, where I do not that larger quakes has increased but not significantly). The data for the installations was taken from the IRIS networks and of course does not include other networks not encompassed by IRIS, but which one could reasonably presume to have grown at similar rates.



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 05:54 AM
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reply to post by troubleshooter
 

7.1-magnitude earthquake rattles Solomon Islands 2010/04/11
www.nst.com.my...

HONIARA : A major 7.1-magnitude earthquake struck near the Solomon Islands in the western Pacific on Sunday, the US Geological Survey said, but there was no immediate tsunami alert or reports of damage.

The quake struck at a depth of about 52 kilometres with an epicentre 97 kilometres southwest of Kira Kira on Makira Island, the USGS said.

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center said there was no destructive widespread tsunami threat, but added in a bulletin: "Earthquakes of this size sometimes generate local tsunamis that can be destructive along coasts located within 100 kilometres of the earthquake epicentre.

"Authorities in the region of the epicentre should be aware of this possibility and take action."

Like much of the Pacific, the Solomons regularly experiences earthquakes.

A string of tremors rocked the western Solomon Islands in January, with the largest of 7.2 causing a tsunami estimated at nearly 2.5 metres.


Around 1,000 people - almost a third of the population - are believed to have been left homeless on Rendova island due to earthquake and tsunami damage.

In April 2007, an 8.0-magnitude earthquake in the western Solomons triggered a tsunami that killed more than 50 people and displaced thousands. Gizo harbour lost most of its wharves and jetties in the quake and subsequent tsunami.

In September last year, a devastating tsunami swept along coasts in the Pacific islands of Samoa and Tonga, killing 186 people and wiping out entire villages.

Villages and resorts in Samoa, American Samoa and northern Tonga were flattened by the giant waves generated by the massive earthquake, the strongest in nearly a century. - AFP




posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 06:01 AM
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Originally posted by PuterMan

Complete and utter nonsense unless you weight those figures to adjust for an increase of 3000+ seismographs over the period which will have picked up more quakes. Your own graph shows that with the jump between the 80s and 90s


You're sadly misinformed if you believe that earthquake detection and reporting back in the 70's, 80's and 90's was vastly inferior to that of today. To accurately triangulate any significant earthquake event requires as few as 3 stations so adding a few 1000 more isn't going to pick up any extra big ones ... more useful for detecting the smaller magnitude quakes which could be too faint to be picked up by fewer stations in the past.

Earthquake pinpointing has been highly accurate since the 50's ... you only have to consider that the Americans were able to detect Russian nuclear detonations during the Cold War era by their unique seismological signatures ... so in future, try not to jump to such baseless accusations.



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 06:12 AM
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reply to post by troubleshooter
 

Location Map Solomons Earthquake...








[edit on 11/4/10 by troubleshooter]



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 06:14 AM
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Originally posted by tauristercus

Originally posted by PuterMan

Complete and utter nonsense unless you weight those figures to adjust for an increase of 3000+ seismographs over the period which will have picked up more quakes. Your own graph shows that with the jump between the 80s and 90s


You're sadly misinformed if you believe that earthquake detection and reporting back in the 70's, 80's and 90's was vastly inferior to that of today. To accurately triangulate any significant earthquake event requires as few as 3 stations so adding a few 1000 more isn't going to pick up any extra big ones ... more useful for detecting the smaller magnitude quakes which could be too faint to be picked up by fewer stations in the past.

Earthquake pinpointing has been highly accurate since the 50's ... you only have to consider that the Americans were able to detect Russian nuclear detonations during the Cold War era by their unique seismological signatures ... so in future, try not to jump to such baseless accusations.


It would seem that you not actually bothered to assimilate the information that was imparted to you by Phage and others on your own thread on this subject, yet you have quoted part of a post by Phage. Not only am I NOT misinformed, neither are my 'accusations', if you must call them that, baseless. I studied geology in my younger days and have a great interest in it now. Your definition as to what constitutes a 'big one' is the problem here. As amply explained by Phage and others these smaller quakes are more difficult to determine over distances, especially if the quake occurs in a remote area far distant from any seismograph stations. This information is also imparted by the USGS, yet you choose to believe they are wrong?

I am also not sadly misinformed, or making baseless accusations when I point out to you that statistically the basis of your graph is incorrect.

By the way I have to say that I am quite interested in your thread and I think it had merit. Our hangup here is the statistics.



[edit on 11/4/2010 by PuterMan]



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 06:24 AM
link   

Originally posted by tauristercus
Seems like the trend is still there .... as per my thread and prediction
EARTHQUAKES: An analysis indicating increasing frequency and severity
www.abovetopsecret.com...






Looking at the above summary, it is plainly obvious that overall, earthquake activity was on a gradual decline in the decades prior to 1990 but then unexpectedly, in the year 1991, some kind of 'tipping point' was reached and the number and intensity of subsequent earthquakes in all magnitude ranges began a steady and statistically significant increase.
Amalgamating all the data from the 3 magnitude ranges still shows a consistent and undeniable trend of increasing earthquake activity as is obvious in the overall increase of 38%.


So, can we conclude that the 'feelings' and 'impressions' that many ATS members have regarding significant increases in earthquake activity is justified ?
From the above analysis, it appears that we can conclude that there is indeed strong justification for such a belief.



PREDICTION

Based on the observed trends, it is more than likely that earthquake activity will continue to increase over time and that based on the above clearly observed trends, the greater proportion of future major earthquake events will be seen to occur primarily within the 6.0 to 6.9 magnitude range. However, it would also appear that we will be seeing increasing numbers of events also occurring within the 7.0 to 7.9 and 8.0 and higher magnitude ranges, compared to what were observed to have happened in past decades.


Thanks for your contrribution to the thread...
...you might be interested in the comments of the Volcanologist on the program run tonight on Australian TV...
...concerning the frequency of these events...

...au.tv.yahoo.com...




posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 06:46 AM
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Think of the 'deep' earthquakes as 'fast movers' and shallow ones as just destructive quakes hitting resistance and snapping.

I wish they would check the buoy data (GPS) and check to see if the ROF (Pacific Plate) has moved any? I bet it has. And more than 14 ft too.



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 06:48 AM
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Originally posted by Pharyax
Think of the 'deep' earthquakes as 'fast movers' and shallow ones as just destructive quakes hitting resistance and snapping.

I wish they would check the buoy data (GPS) and check to see if the ROF (Pacific Plate) has moved any? I bet it has. And more than 14 ft too.


I saw a program on TV earlier tonight about a seismologist. He was explaining that the pacific plate is extremely active at the moment. He was taking samples of magma to investigate or soemthing



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 06:55 AM
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reply to post by tauristercus
 


You beat me to it. Not to mention the trend of 7.0 becoming a monthly occurence, if we follow that pattern, it is showing a marked increase...



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 07:27 AM
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reply to post by troubleshooter
 

news.blogs.cnn.com...

06:55 AM ET

6.8-magnitude quake hits off Solomon Islands
A 6.8-magnitude earthquake struck off the Solomon Islands on Sunday, but did not pose a tsunami threat, the National Weather Service said.

The quake's epicenter was 60 miles (97 km) southwest of Kira Kira, the capital of the Makira-Ulawa province.

"Based on all available data, a destructive Pacific-wide tsunami is not expected and there is no threat to Hawaii," the weather service's Pacific Tsunami Warning Center said.

Yula Jeffrey, a worker at a hotel in the Solomon Islands capital of Honiara, said the quake was powerful but the streets were largely calm.

The hotel, Solomon Kitano Mendana Hotel, did not suffer any damage, he said.

The quake originally was reported as a 7.0-magnitude event, but was revised to 6.8




posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 07:30 AM
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reply to post by troubleshooter
 

Latest details downgraded to magnitude 6.8.

Magnitude 6.8 - SOLOMON ISLANDS
2010 April 11 09:40:30 UTC

Magnitude 6.8
Date-Time Sunday, April 11, 2010 at 09:40:30 UTC
Sunday, April 11, 2010 at 08:40:30 PM at epicenter

Location 10.913°S, 161.130°E
Depth 60.2 km (37.4 miles)
Region SOLOMON ISLANDS
Distances 100 km (65 miles) WSW of Kira Kira, San Cristobal, Solomon Isl.
205 km (130 miles) SE of HONIARA, Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands
245 km (150 miles) S of Auki, Malaita, Solomon Islands
2025 km (1260 miles) NNE of BRISBANE, Queensland, Australia




posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 07:30 AM
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Duplicate...

[edit on 11/4/10 by troubleshooter]



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 07:38 AM
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Originally posted by redeyedwonder
reply to post by tauristercus
 


You beat me to it. Not to mention the trend of 7.0 becoming a monthly occurence, if we follow that pattern, it is showing a marked increase...


A monthly occurrence of a 7.0 would be about right - according to the USGS around 17 per year of mag 7.0 - 7.9 is average.

Magnitude Average Annually

8 and higher 1
7 - 7.9 17
6 - 6.9 134
5 - 5.9 1319
4 - 4.9 13,000 (estimated)
3 - 3.9 130,000 (estimated)
2 - 2.9 1,300,000 (estimated)



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 08:00 AM
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Originally posted by MoorfNZ

Originally posted by redeyedwonder
reply to post by tauristercus
 


You beat me to it. Not to mention the trend of 7.0 becoming a monthly occurence, if we follow that pattern, it is showing a marked increase...


A monthly occurrence of a 7.0 would be about right - according to the USGS around 17 per year of mag 7.0 - 7.9 is average.





1970 to 1989 (20 years) had 245 events which is an average of 12 per year.
1990 to 2009 (20 years) had 278 events which is an average of 14 per year.

This gives an increase of 13.5% in mag 7.0 to 7.9 events in the 20 years post 1990 compared to the 20 years pre 1990.

One can also see an obvious reversal point or 'trigger event' occurring at 1990 / 1991.



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 10:57 AM
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Article:

An earthquake measuring Richter 7.1 has shaken the Pacific seabed some 210 kilometres southeast of the Solomon Islands capital Honiara. The dislocation was 60 kilometres beneath the surface of the ocean. There is no word of damage or casualties in the quake, and there was no tsunami alert.

Source: english.ruvr.ru...




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