It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Does your cell phone battery have a memory?

page: 1
1

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 07:53 PM
link   
Ok well as the topic subject states, I had an LG vx9900 cell phone, and with that cell phone the charge would die within 30mins of leaving idle or 15 in use, give or take. Well today it completely died, would not charge on the house charger nor the car charger. So I had another cell laying around, which was a Motorola. I took at peek at the back of the cells battery and both put out 3.7v/ Lithium-ion powered. The batteries are totally different, but they had + - sides labeled on the four prongs so I held the Motorola battery with my hand in place to complete the connection to the lg phone, and as doing so the phone powered up......and then went to a screen that said replace with a genuine battery! Well I hit a key and something popped up but I didn’t/wasn’t able to read it quickly enough. well the phone shuts down. I did this several times, but never was able to recreate that different message. So I guess somehow the phone is able to recognize it own kind of power source, as if the battery itself holds some kind of signature. if all the phone needs is a 3.7v source of juice to power it up, why would it deny the 3.7v from Motorola?

edit: it powers down in 10 seconds with a count down.

[edit on 9-4-2010 by Sippy Cup]




posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 08:18 PM
link   
That is weird indeed !

Maybe along with the batteries there is a microchip installed to prevent people from scramble together a phone when they are supposed to by a new one.



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 08:19 PM
link   
It must work similar to toner cartridges for laser printers.

They make generic ones that will fit our laser printers at work, but we won't get the "Genuine HP Cartridge Installed" message with those.

Yep -- im guessing there is an "ID" or something in cell batteries (prob. so you have to buy their own)!!!



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 08:26 PM
link   
Yes there will be a microchip (or similar) which identifies the battery to the phone. Pretty much all laptops are the same as well. In theory it stops inferior batteries being used in these products and catching on fire or exploding.



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 08:30 PM
link   
My guess is the 2 extra prongs might carry the signal that collects the amount of charge currently in the battery. The phone probably didn't detect the signal or detected a different one. No clue though, just a guess. I don't even own a cellphone.



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 09:24 PM
link   
reply to post by Bumr055
 


I think that is the key the extra two prongs! From memory all memory to to electronics is the electrical currnet its an on off thang, 1's 0's a + charge and - charge. triggers a switch to go or stop.
Thanks for giving some infor or insight!



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 09:48 PM
link   
A lithium battery usually has more than one cell. The other connections are to equalise the charge between the cells as well as temperature sensing so that the battery doesn't overheat during charging.

Modern batteries are a pretty complex thing.



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 09:48 PM
link   
reply to post by GobbledokTChipeater
 


Well as an update, I caught part of the paragraph message, and I caught overheating , but that was a paragraph message, well then it shuts down!
Now I have a hp laptop a newer one, well Ive already wrecked the cord that go’s into it to charge it. Well I rigged a new piece into it to bring charge.(I was mad scared I would blow my lap mother board) but I check and over check all the proper pole’s, and I was able to charge my hp with my rig.

thanks for your info for real thank you.

but how does an 3.7 v over heat a phone that takes a 3.7v?



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 10:05 PM
link   
reply to post by GobbledokTChipeater
 


Thanks dude you have been very insightful!! But is a battery more complex than us?
(me yeah) lol until I figure it out. I will tomorrow look into cell battery construction, and internal workings! But facebook or ats might get me distracted.
Still the phone companies are in cohoots to keep their products from being hill billy’ed together, no reason a 3.7v Motorola battery would over heat a LG phone that uses a 3.7 battery.



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 10:17 PM
link   
reply to post by Sippy Cup
 


No, it should be fine as long as both of the batteries are the same construction (i.e. they both are Lithium ion).

If they are the same construction then the only difference between them will be the data that it puts out when connected to a phone.



posted on Apr, 10 2010 @ 01:39 AM
link   
reply to post by GobbledokTChipeater
 


What is this data, the sig, ....why are you playing cat n mouse!!!!!



posted on Apr, 10 2010 @ 02:51 AM
link   
reply to post by Sippy Cup
 


I guess the data put out depends on the type and brand of battery; there is no standard.

And, well, I am a cat



new topics

top topics



 
1

log in

join