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U.S. Marine Becomes First Blind Double Amputee to Re-Enlist

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posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 04:18 PM
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U.S. Marine Becomes First Blind Double Amputee to Re-Enlist


www.foxnews.com

He has no legs and no eyesight, but Marine Cpl. Matthew Bradford has four more years of military service ahead of him after becoming the first blind double-amputee to re-enlist.

The rifleman was injured in January 2007 in Iraq when a roadside bomb exploded right under him, the San Antonio Express-News reported.

But after years at the Center for the Intrepid, a privately funded, cutting-edge rehabilitation center, Bradford, 23, has learned to walk with prosthetic limbs and navigate without his vision, and he only regrets that he can’t return to combat duty in Iraq, the paper reported.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 04:18 PM
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While the injuries sustained in defense of our country were horrific, this brave man has persevered and overcome monumental hurdles to re-enlist. To take on the task of working with wounded Marines and helping them cope with their injuries goes beyond the call of duty in my opinion. He is a shining example of the caliber of human being that make up our armed forces.

www.foxnews.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 04:24 PM
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reply to post by Mirthful Me
 


You could say that. You could also say that there is evidently something deeply wrong with this man psychologically, that would cause him to wish he could return to active duty after seeing the damage active duty wrought upon him.

Having just come out of reading a deep study of the Heavens Gate cult a few minutes ago, I can truly see parallels between the fanatic mentality, and lifetime supporters of the military complex.

An interesting, if highly disturbing, parallel.

EDIT: For those who might miss my lower response, I am referring to the articles statement that this gentleman regrets his inability to return to active combat. I make no statement regarding his current re-enlistment, nor original enlistment.

[edit on 9-4-2010 by D.E.M.]



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 04:32 PM
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reply to post by Mirthful Me
 


At the rate neuroprosthetics are developing he should have his sight back, if the military pays for it within ten years or less.

I hope that the military looks at the future of neuroprosthetics and how they can help our soldiers. Combat grade products will eventually be made and the military needs to look at rehabilitating anyone who has the will to fight. For some military personnel, being unable to go into combat is very depressing and devastating.



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 04:35 PM
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reply to post by D.E.M.
 


His activity won't involve any overseas deployments, nor will he be exposed to combat conditions. It is more likely that he most sane, and seeks to be as productive as possible given the extent of his injuries. That coupled with a career path that can provide retirement and education coupled with continued care (He'll get cutting edge prosthetics as long as he's active duty). The glass is more than half full...




posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 04:45 PM
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reply to post by D.E.M.
 


The only thing "wrong" with him is that he's human.

Humans have always had warriors, warrior classes, or warrior castes. This is who he is. This is what he is. Its his life.

There are many other professions and associated cultures, that identify who and what you are.

If he was a doctor, judge, farmer, etc, it wouldn't be any different.



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 04:49 PM
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The military is finally realizing that simply because a man lost his limbs, etc, that doesn't mean he's out of the fight.

True, maybe this Marine can't go into combat, but he still has skills and experience to pass onto other Marines.

abcnews.go.com...

This TACP was finally given the go-ahead to reenlist recently. I heard a lecture he gave at the USAFA titled, "The day I went 'boom'".



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 04:50 PM
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reply to post by D.E.M.
 



To steal a quote:

"It's a military thing; you wouldn't understand."



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 04:51 PM
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reply to post by Mirthful Me
 


Nono, I can see the logic from the standpoint of personal preservation. Far better to reap the benefits than end up on the street homeless.

What disturbed me was the articles assertion that, even with his crippling disabilities, he still regrets being unable to return to combat duty. As I said, a troubling insight into the psychology of today's soldiers. Unless, of course, it is all just a face for positive PR.



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 04:51 PM
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reply to post by D.E.M.
 


Or you could say he believes in something greater then himself such as honor, duty and service.

Honor to the vow he took.

Duty not only to his country but his fellow Marines, and service to not only his country and it's people but to his fellow Marines and service men and women.

Service to others who have also been injured in line of duty without whining or crying about how unfair life is.

I see no reason to to disrespect his desire to continue to be a productive, contributing person in the manner he sees right and just. Indeed, I see much in his actions to not only respect but to appreciate. The only shame or disturbing thing I see is that we don't have more people like him who pick themselves up and keep going no matter the challenges they face.

[edit on 9-4-2010 by gallopinghordes]



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 04:56 PM
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Originally posted by D.E.M.
reply to post by Mirthful Me
 


You could say that. You could also say that there is evidently something deeply wrong with this man psychologically, that would cause him to wish he could return to active duty after seeing the damage active duty wrought upon him.

Having just come out of reading a deep study of the Heavens Gate cult a few minutes ago, I can truly see parallels between the fanatic mentality, and lifetime supporters of the military complex.

An interesting, if highly disturbing, parallel.


He is trying to do what he likes and knows best, be a Marine to other Marines!

Second line: I myself am not a Marine... Always out front



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 05:44 PM
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I certainly don't mean to sound crass or anything of that nature, but I do wonder if he feels that he nothing left to lose and may indeed have a suicidal, self serving agenda. I hope that isn't the case........



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 06:08 PM
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reply to post by D.E.M.
 


If an enemy IED stole your legs and your eyes from you, would you tuck your tail and hide or would you desire a chance to help finish the fight against them? This is a major problem with humanity today vs past generations... when someone embraces the honorable rather than the cowardly, their mental health is questioned. I guess bravery is a psychological disease to some and that's more than a bit scary.



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 06:12 PM
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I think this may be a matter of, well, partly the fact he's a soldier, and he doesn't want to do anything else. But also, that the only ones who will ever be able to fully understand what he's been through - are other soldiers, or in this case, marines. I hope he finds peace in the Corps.

I know I, for one, would be driven to the brink of madness without my feet, and worse, my eyes.



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 06:16 PM
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Considering everything the military can offer this man, it's a no brainer that he'd re-enlist. However, he wouldn't be in the situation that he is if it weren't for the military and the situations that they had put him into. Oh well, at least he's doing something with his life, unlike me and a lot of other people I know.



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 06:27 PM
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reply to post by RadarMan
 


I disagree with your statement. This individual "chose" his profession and in lieu of everything that has been shown and provided by any and all media, he knew the risks involved. No one made him join, at least I don't believe they did, so to say that the government made him is not a fair statement.

I apologize..I read your post entirely the wrong way.....

[edit on 9-4-2010 by savageheart]



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 08:11 PM
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Well, he can eventually retire, plus receive disability benefits from the VA. And, unlike in the past, he can collect both. Plus he has the opportunity to help other marines cope, perhaps with less debilitating injuries than he has. Kudos to this marine for serving his fellow marines and for seeing the economic advantage of this service.



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 09:48 PM
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Of course as a fellow veteran I begrudge this Marine nothing.

I just feel bad about all those very capable, highly professional, and more than willing soldiers, airmen, sailors, and Marines who were forced out of the service because they had 'incompatible' conditions that policy-makers were not willing to invest in.

I'm not sure how the military decided to return this man to duty, but it certainly required a considerable deviation from the regulations as I understood them for many years.

It's a good thing, of course. But how many soldiers benefit from such treatment I wonder? Why this soldier? And will there be more?



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 10:10 PM
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Originally posted by D.E.M.
reply to post by Mirthful Me
 


You could say that. You could also say that there is evidently something deeply wrong with this man psychologically, that would cause him to wish he could return to active duty after seeing the damage active duty wrought upon him.

Having just come out of reading a deep study of the Heavens Gate cult a few minutes ago, I can truly see parallels between the fanatic mentality, and lifetime supporters of the military complex.

An interesting, if highly disturbing, parallel.

EDIT: For those who might miss my lower response, I am referring to the articles statement that this gentleman regrets his inability to return to active combat. I make no statement regarding his current re-enlistment, nor original enlistment.

[edit on 9-4-2010 by D.E.M.]


It's not easy to live in a war zone and then just come back to the rest of the world. I would have serious issues trying to become re-socialized after such an experience



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 10:25 PM
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If this is accurate then.. wow, the military seems to be destroying there solders mentally, I don't understand how he could want to return, is it to help his buddy's? is there (and no offense intended) psychological issues at play? or does he truly believe they are bringing democracy to that area?



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