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Colorado State University Archaeologist Discovers Ancient Lost City in Mexico

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posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 03:11 PM
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G'day ATS!

I found this today and I thought it was worth posting.

Colorado State University



FORT COLLINS - A Colorado State University archaeologist and his team have discovered the ruins of an ancient urban center in the heart of the Purépecha Empire in Lake Pátzcuaro Basin, located in the central Mexican state of Michoacán.


Graphic model of ancient building complex


At the time of European contact, the Purépecha Empire - sometimes called the Tarascan Empire - controlled much of western Mexico with a mutually fortified frontier shared with their rivals, the Aztecs to the east.


Graphic model of pyramid complex


The settlement may be as large as 5 square kilometers and dates to A.D. 1000-1520. Initial results suggest the peak occupation of the newly discovered urban center occurred just prior to the formation of the Purépecha Empire, further indicating that results from the study may yield new clues regarding the empire’s formation.


Archaeologists on the top of the newly discovered pyramid!

Lake Pátzcuaro, is a place where locals:


believe that the lake is the place where the barrier between life and death is the thinnest.


How cool is that!!?

The Tarasco culture and empire



Among the fertile volcanoes of Michoacan Lumholtz came across the Purepecha people, who were called Tarascan by the Spanish. Enemies of the Aztecs, the Tarascans flourished from 1100 A.D. to 1530 A.D. Their origins are still a puzzle, along with their stirrup-shaped, long-necked bottles and round temples called Yacatas. The center of the Tarascan Empire was Lake Patzcuaro and the nearby site of Tzintzuntzan, now a much-visited archaeological site (Map of area). After the Conquest, Spanish missionaries organized the Tarascan Empire into a series of experimental Utopian craft-oriented villages, and today the Lake Patzcuaro area abounds with craftspeople skilled in wood, copper, cloth and clay.


A house feature being excavated

I think there will be more detail to come once this has been presented to the annual Society for American Archaeology. I hope a detailed map and some good pictures will be released then.

All the best, Kiwi!





[edit on 9-4-2010 by kiwifoot]




posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 03:38 PM
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Great find!


I just love this stuff
Wonder why the locals believe that about the area...



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 03:42 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 03:54 PM
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Originally posted by Jomina
Great find!


I just love this stuff
Wonder why the locals believe that about the area...


I found a picture and it looks like a beautiful place, maybe it was so beautiful that it was almost spiritual, I like the idea though, it's going on my places to visit!



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 03:59 PM
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Originally posted by Chamberf=6
reply to post by kiwifoot
 


How do you pronounce their civilazation? Turashcans?

just kidding, Cool find and post. Interesting how much of the past is still yet to be discovered....


Haha I think you're close with that pronunciation, but I'm only guessing!

I love the Ancient Civilisations forum, I relish the chance to look back into the past, give examples, but always there's a mystery or two because we can NEVER know %100!




posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 04:18 PM
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Interesting find! Ancient civilizations has always been an interest of mine. There's just no telling how many more cities in Mexico and South America that have been covered by jungle awaiting to be discovered.



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 04:35 PM
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An entire city that has been uninhabited for just 500 years, has completely eluded archeologists? To me, THAT is the most significant aspect of this story.

It really gives me a new appreciation of the far older sites that are still intact. We think that our 100 story skyscrapers will last centuries. Wrong. Metal oxidizes and these buildings must be renovated every 20 or so years. To create a long-lasting structure, you simply have to make it out of stone, or composite materials. If we were wiped out and the sea level rose 20 meters, there would be far fewer traces of our presence after a couple centuries than the average person would suspect.

Also it makes me think of how many as-yet undiscovered civilizations might still be out there just under our noses.

Cheers



posted on Apr, 10 2010 @ 08:24 AM
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Originally posted by Son of Will


Also it makes me think of how many as-yet undiscovered civilizations might still be out there just under our noses.



My friend, this line of thought is what makes the Ancient Civilisations Forum so exciting for me, thanks for posting.

all the best, Kiwi!



posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 12:22 AM
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edit on 9/21/2013 by Tarasco because: Replied to wrong post....



posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 12:26 AM
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reply to post by Chamberf=6
 


That was a RACIST comment...

Grow up fool...!

Tarasco
(My real ID)



posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 12:30 AM
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I wanted to know a little bit more about the Tarascan people....but i didn't expect something like this...


Tarascan (təräˈskən) [key], Native Americans of the state of Michoacán, Mexico. Their language has no known relation to other languages, and their history prior to the 16th cent. is poorly understood. The polity present at the time of the Spanish conquest (1521) had roughly the same territorial outline as the contemporary state of Michoacán, which it successfully defended against a protracted and bloody Aztec attack in the year 1479. Their capital, Tzintzuntzán [place of the hummingbirds], was located on the shore of Lake Pátzcuaro and had a population of 25,000 to 35,000. Peculiar to Tarascan culture were T-shaped pyramids, rising in terraces and faced with stone slabs without mortar. They were skilled weavers, and were famous for their feathered mosaics made from hummingbird plumage. Most of the over 100,000 contemporary Tarascans are impoverished residents of small rural communities who supplement agricultural production with craft specializations (e.g., weaving, embroidery, woodworking, and lacquerware) and seasonal migration to the United States.

Read more: Tarascan | Infoplease.com www.infoplease.com...


Mexconnect

Like the Aztecs, the Tarascans had many deities, each with their own attributes, requirements, sacred colors, associated animals, and calendrical days. The most ancient and revered Tarascan deity was Curicaueri, the fire god. A Tarascan origin myth tells the story of how Curicaueri and his brother gods founded the settlements around Lake Pátzcuaro. The pre-Columbian Tarascans believed themselves to be Curicaueri's descendants. When rulers and priests dressed in their ritual finery and performed ceremonial dances, they were affirming the connection to their ancestor gods.

The Aztecs attempted more than once to conquer the Tarascan lands, but never attained their goal. This left the Aztecs with a major rival on their western border. In combat they repeatedly suffered grievous losses to the Tarascan armies. For example, in 1478 the ruling Aztec lord, Axayacatl, marched against the Tarascans. He found his army of 24,000 confronted by an opposing force of more than 40,000 Tarascan warriors. A ferocious battle went on all day. Many of the Aztec warriors were badly wounded by arrows, stones, spears, and sword thrusts. The following day, the Aztecs were forced to retreat, having suffered the loss of more than half of their elite warriors.


They kicked Aztec ass, what does that say about them and surprise, surprise. Another Meso-american culture with references to the stars...
Wiki


In the region of Zacapu, Curicaueri is referred to as Querenda-angapeti, which means "the penalty which is in the Temple".

According to the mythology of the Purépecha culture - particularly of the clan uacusecha- Curicaueri is considered the most ancient deity and which gave rise to the rest of the gods. The Sun is known as a son of Caricaueri and dies every day in the West as a victim of the night, being banished by the young sun or Curicaueri grandson. Thus combines the Trinity of the fire, which is interpreted in a similar way with three stars in the constellation of Taurus: Aldebaran, Beta and gamma. In the sky three stars resemble the parahtacuqua, which is an instrument used by the Purépecha to light the fire.


"A penalty in the temple", could this be the same temple?
edit on 21-9-2013 by Thorneblood because: (no reason given)
edit on 21-9-2013 by Thorneblood because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 01:57 PM
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Very interesting.....

.... but one oddity is that they are claiming to have found an 'ancient urban center' which they did, but the fact that there were ruins in that area has been known since the 16th century and a great deal of ecological work has been done in the past around and in that lake district.

Maybe just a tad misleading in that regards and a fine find indeed.



posted on Sep, 24 2013 @ 03:21 PM
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Tarasco
reply to post by Chamberf=6
 


That was a RACIST comment...

Grow up fool...!

Tarasco
(My real ID)


A joking question about pronunciation is racist? It made no comment on the people or their qualities.

It was about a word.

...and your name is not the same as the word I asked about anyway.

edit on 9/24/2013 by Chamberf=6 because: (no reason given)





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