It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

National Geographic Moon Photos-I think I found a flub in one of the photos-need 2nd opinion

page: 1
1
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 03:20 PM
link   
While looking around National Geograpic, I came across a picture spead of moon & related stuff shots. Well, since I have joined ATS, I have become a very big skeptic of moon photos and the alike.
Source: science.nationalgeographic.com...

Anyway, the photos are cool. Exhibiting all the normal characteristics (no stars in the background-high resolution photos/up close the whole deal). To me, most of them seem staged.

Well, this one appears to have a shadow not alined with the fellow in the pic [look to the left side, slightly up, before the vehicle. See the rock on the craters edge-right before the back right wheel- the shadow appears to be heading to the left-as opposed to the astronauts shadow-which is going straight ahead. Am I wrong or maybe the pic is distorded somehow for processing etc.

The reason I even thought of it was due to a recent post about fake moon photos and one huge light to create the Sun effect-I looked for the post but couldn't find it.

Sorry for not being able to highlight the spot as I am not able to do that yet.

[edit on 4/8/2010 by anon72]




posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 03:24 PM
link   
 


off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 03:26 PM
link   
So are you implying that this particular photo is in some way fabricated, and that all the Moon landings were fake as a result?

What do you think is more plausible... that you might be interpreting the photo incorrectly, or that the other tens of thousands of photos, films, etc., are all fake, too, and that the tens of thousands of people involved in the program are all in on the deception?



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 03:30 PM
link   
reply to post by Blue Shift
 

Honestly, I think it is a staged photo but that doesn't mean we didn't go to the moon etc. I just hoping I am not seeing things but to me, the shadow looks odd compared to the rest-YES or NO? But, thanks for the 2nd opinion.... ugh

Anyway, I found the post I referenced in the OP. It was by ATSer bochen181: www.abovetopsecret.com...

Read that post, then hopefully you see why I look at these photos extra hard now-a-days.



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 03:32 PM
link   
Why the shadow is pointing in a different direction, is because of the terrain of the Luna surface is not even. If you look to where the Astronaut he is on a level surface. the rock on the other hand is sitting just on top of the crater so the shadow gets distorted to follow the trail of the crater.



[edit on 8-4-2010 by TheCosmicOcean]



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 03:49 PM
link   
reply to post by anon72
 


So you think this photo is fake? Go ahead and prove it. A lot of people before you have tried, none of them have succeeded though. Wonder why
Let it go.



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 03:57 PM
link   

Originally posted by anon72
While looking around National Geograpic, I came across a picture spead of moon & related stuff shots. Well, since I have joined ATS, I have become a very big skeptic of moon photos and the alike.
Source: science.nationalgeographic.com...

Anyway, the photos are cool. Exhibiting all the normal characteristics (no stars in the background-high resolution photos/up close the whole deal). To me, most of them seem staged.

Well, this one appears to have a shadow not alined with the fellow in the pic [look to the left side, slightly up, before the vehicle. See the rock on the craters edge-right before the back right wheel- the shadow appears to be heading to the left-as opposed to the astronauts shadow-which is going straight ahead. Am I wrong or maybe the pic is distorded somehow for processing etc.

The reason I even thought of it was due to a recent post about fake moon photos and one huge light to create the Sun effect-I looked for the post but couldn't find it.

Sorry for not being able to highlight the spot as I am not able to do that yet.

[edit on 4/8/2010 by anon72]


I like how the shadow of the man is right in front of him, but the rock to his right, (your left if your looking at the picture), has a shadow in another direction.

....hmmmm not to mention that sun is pretty small



edited to add, the rock has 2 shadows.


Looks fake, but then again how much stuff does the NASA front sort through and release.

The world may never know.



[edit on 8-4-2010 by Quickfix]



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 04:44 PM
link   
reply to post by Quickfix
 


Sounds like you are an expert. Why don't you get some material similar to the material found on the lunar surface, build a model with it, and test it out. Let us know what your research shows. Oh wait, you probably won't do that. It is much too easy to just dismiss the photo as fake.



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 04:49 PM
link   
reply to post by Longtimegone
 


Well instead of verbally attacking me, why don't you make an assessment of the photo yourself.

I said it looked fake, not that it was 100% fake.

The lighting in the background doesn't look like the sun, I didn't know it could be so small!

And some of the shadows of rocks are out of place as well.

Over all the photo is sketchy as some would say.

I may be no expert, I just use my common sense.



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 04:56 PM
link   
I've never understood why shadows point in different directions in moon photos. The sun should surely cast shadows in the same direction, what with it being so far away; and yet, even on flat ground, shadows point more like they are being cast by a nearby light. I've never bothered looking up the reason for it though - perhaps someone will post it here.



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 05:29 PM
link   
reply to post by ShadowArcher
 


Just take a camera out this evening near sunset and take photos. The shadows are cast on to the ground, if the ground is not flat then it distorts your perception of the shadow and if the object being shadowed is not uniform (e.g. the rock to his right) then it appears to be bent when it is not.



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 06:20 PM
link   

Originally posted by ShadowArcher
I've never understood why shadows point in different directions in moon photos. The sun should surely cast shadows in the same direction, what with it being so far away; and yet, even on flat ground, shadows point more like they are being cast by a nearby light. I've never bothered looking up the reason for it though - perhaps someone will post it here.


Shadows from the Sun are parallel. The catch is that parallel lines do not always look parallel You see this every day:



As shown above, perspective causes shadows to converge when looking down-sun...



...or diverge when looking up-sun...



...just like in the photo of Charlie Duke on the Moon.

Incidentally, uneven ground can also cause parallel shadows to look odd:




posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 06:33 PM
link   
reply to post by ararisq
 


It's too late at night for me to be polite to people who don't read my post before giving me such 'advice'. I specifically said, 'even when the ground is flat'. I know it isn't in this particular one.

Saint Exupery - I know shadows cast towards or away from the viewer can be seen as not being parallel (and I of course know they seem it on uneven surfaces) but should that apply to shadows seen from any angle? I don't think it does, I can't see a reason for it (though it IS late). Thanks for explaining though
can you explain that too? (that's not sarcasm! A real question) I have a picture in mind, but I have no idea how to find that specific one. It's a flat area, with some rocks, the sun to the side, out of fram, and the shadows aren't parallel.

EDIT: I was a little too short in that first paragraph, sorry. Tiredness isn't an excuse


[edit on 8-4-2010 by ShadowArcher]



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 06:38 PM
link   

Originally posted by Quickfix

The lighting in the background doesn't look like the sun, I didn't know it could be so small!


That's not the sun. That's a lens-flare from the camera. You don't see them as much in low-end cameras. Fancy lenses which contain several glass elements have better optical qualities, but their Achilles' Heel is that bright lights can reflect off these elements, and even if the light source itself is not in the image, these reflections can appear. In the lunar surface photos, lense-flares show up particularly well agains the black sky.


And some of the shadows of rocks are out of place as well.

Over all the photo is sketchy as some would say.

I may be no expert, I just use my common sense.


"Common sense"... but you never noticed perspective?



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 06:49 PM
link   
reply to post by Saint Exupery
 


THANK YOU This thread was driving me crazy as I was reading down. Your examples are excellent and make the point well.

BTW I didn't realize there were sub-burbs and beaches on the moon
( j/k obviously)



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 07:00 PM
link   
reply to post by ShadowArcher
 


I'll bet you're thinking of AS14-68-9487. As I pointed out in the last photo above, uneven ground can cause shadows to appear non-parallel when viewed cross-sun.

The linked Apollo 14 photo was addressed by the famous "Mythbusters" episode. They used models to recreate the image. First they set-up the rocks on level ground. Behold, the shadows were parallel. Then they placed the rocks in the same position, but sitting on a small pile of dirt. The shadow which had been on the flat table now went down the dirt slope and diverged sharply from the LM shadow, just as it does in AS14-68-9487.

In the lunar photos, the lunar dust is so monochromatic that uneven terrain can be very difficult to notice. Often, the odd shadows may be the only indicator that the ground is uneven. In most pictures, it look as though the astronauts were standing on a flat plain. In fact, at virtually every site the ground was pocked by craters of every size, and the ground sloped this way and that. I've looked at many good stereo pairs on lunar landscapes (for example, AS14-68-9487 makes a stereo pair with AS14-68-9486) and the effect on the seemingly-bland landscape is quite startling.

[edit on 8-4-2010 by Saint Exupery]



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 07:08 PM
link   
reply to post by Saint Exupery
 


I admit I am wrong, I just forgot about lens flare. I should have noticed it on the left side of the picture where there is some rainbow to it too.

I was just making my own assessment of the picture


Like I said I am no expert, just try to use my common sense, I'm sick at home so cut me some slack



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 07:22 PM
link   
reply to post by Quickfix
 


Well, at least you're not like some, who see a lens-flare and shriek "IT'S A SPOTLIGHT!!!1!eleventy-one"



Get well soon!



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 07:26 PM
link   
reply to post by Saint Exupery
 


hahaha spotlight,


Indeed. Looks real


Although I would like to tamper with the black background to see if any other imaging pops up.



edited to add: THANKS for the get well!


[edit on 8-4-2010 by Quickfix]



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 07:30 PM
link   
reply to post by Quickfix
 



When people say things like you do about shadows, it makes me wonder if they ever pay attention when they go outside... or if they go outside at all.

 
Mod Note: Excessive Quoting – Please Review This Link

[edit on Thu Apr 8 2010 by Jbird]



new topics

top topics



 
1
<<   2 >>

log in

join