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Our grey moon.

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posted on Apr, 10 2010 @ 01:22 AM
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reply to post by Sinter Klaas
 


I honestly cannot fathom why you would post such a silly thing.

Obviously the ISS is out of the atmosphere (it couldn't stay in orbit otherwise).

In the photograph, the line-of-site between the ISS and the Moon clearly passes above the atmosphere (that fuzzy blue thing that attenuates to blackness).

I chose that particular photo specifically because it shown the Moon as viewed from above the atmosphere (and because it was pretty - sue me
). If you want one from ISS looking well above the atmosphere, then here:



Identification
Mission: ISS023 Roll: E Frame: 15912 Mission ID on the Film or image: ISS023
Features: PAN-GIBBOUS MOON WANING
Center Point Latitude: Center Point Longitude: (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)
Stereo: (Yes indicates there is an adjacent picture of the same area)
ONC Map ID: JNC Map ID:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Camera
Camera Tilt: High Oblique
Camera Focal Length: 800mm
Camera: N2: Nikon D2Xs
Film: 4288E : 4288 x 2848 pixel CMOS sensor, RGBG imager color filter.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Quality
Film Exposure:
Percentage of Cloud Cover: 10 (0-10)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Nadir
Date: 20100401 (YYYYMMDD)GMT Time: 114332 (HHMMSS)
Nadir Point Latitude: 38.6, Longitude: -62.4 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)
Nadir to Photo Center Direction:
Sun Azimuth: 101 (Clockwise angle in degrees from north to the sun measured at the nadir point)
Spacecraft Altitude: 184 nautical miles (341 km)
Sun Elevation Angle: 20 (Angle in degrees between the horizon and the sun, measured at the nadir point)
Orbit Number: 1138
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I found more than 2,400 others.

Could you please clarify your statement?



[edit on 10-4-2010 by Saint Exupery]




posted on Apr, 10 2010 @ 08:57 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
There is color on the Moon but it is subtle.
Here's what it looks like when the subtle colors are exagerated. The colors aren't fake, they are boosted to make them more visible.

apod.nasa.gov...


I like the NASA picture with exaggerated colors, and also the picture Rogelio Andreo took from his front yard and modified similarly (So you don't really need NASA to try this at home):

blog.deepskycolors.com...




Is the moon really like this? Well, sort of. This is what happens when you take a picture of the moon, neutralize the colors (so the median of the values of R, G and B is the same) and then saturate the image. So in a way, yes, those colors are real, and the only difference is that they've been exaggerated a bit. This was the first time I attempted to take a "colored moon" photo, but I enjoyed it so much I expect to do some more in the future


The moon colors must be subtle and Mars red must not be so subtle because Mars looks pretty red to me from my backyard, even though it's a lot further away than the moon.

[edit on 10-4-2010 by Arbitrageur]



posted on Apr, 10 2010 @ 01:55 PM
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reply to post by Saint Exupery
 



I honestly cannot fathom why you would post such a silly thing.


It really looks like the atmosphere extends higher then where the picture is taken. It also looks like the moon is in front of the part of the athmosphere it's still behind.

I'm no idiot
It just looks like it.

If you take the time to look at the video jazz10 has posted and also a phage posted pictures in the very first few replies.

You would see there is an explanation given why it looks grey from here and from the ISS.

If you are half way to the Moon it seems from there colours just fade away. ( looking at Earth.)



posted on Apr, 10 2010 @ 05:05 PM
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reply to post by Sinter Klaas
 




If you are half way to the Moon it seems from there colours just fade away. ( looking at Earth.)


I believe this would have to do with resolving power of the human eye, or the optics used for the pictures that are taken with.



posted on Apr, 10 2010 @ 09:36 PM
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reply to post by Sinter Klaas
 


Thanks for the clarification, SK. You had me spinning for a moment!


I'm at work and can't view vids.



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