IODINE why you need it, and why you have been lied to.

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posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 12:11 AM
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reply to post by Nightflower
 


I'm just curious as to what your credentials are to be doling out what can only be considered medical advice.
You're giving people the internet equivalent of a prescription, and should someone take your advice and get sick (or worse), you put yourself and this website at risk for malpractice.
What's your background?
If you don't mind my asking.




posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 01:28 AM
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reply to post by Nightflower
 

Iodine must be very important to have attracted so many comments from people claiming medical credentials.




posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 01:49 AM
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reply to post by Nightflower
 


I wouldn't use lugols solution. Although its only a small amount it would still be like taking 3 or 4 drops of bleach.



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 01:57 AM
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Originally posted by ibiubu
reply to post by zzombie
 


Complete junk chemistry...adding iodine to water results in bleach hyperiodite? no such thing as bleach hyperiodite. And, iodine will not react with water to create an iodite species. It is also not soluble in water regardless of temperature and purity.

Potassium Iodide is synthesized, not the product of oxidation. Iodides are soluble in water, the reaction involves oxidation of the iodide species to iodine.

The number one use for iodine is medicinal. Why do you people make stuff up?

[edit on 8-4-2010 by ibiubu]



Complete junk huh ? Maybe you need to go back to your 6th grade science teacher for a review. Its it forms hypoiodite.... my bad I misspelled it fumduck.


In what way and in what form does iodine react with water?
www.lenntech.com...

Iodine is strongly reactive, even though it is less extreme for iodine than for other halogens. Iodine cannot be found as an element, but rather as I2 molecules, as I- ions, or as iodate (a salt of iodinic acid with IO3- anion).
When iodine is added to water, the following reaction results:

I2(l) + H2O(l) -> OI-(aq) + 2H+(aq) + I-(aq)

I2 molecules and water molecules react to substances such as hypoiodite (OI-). The reaction can move both ways of the equilibrium, depending on the pH of the solution.

Iodine may also occur as I3-(aq), HIO(aq), IO-(aq) en HIO3(aq). Iodine can bind to many different substances, for example other halogens. The compounds that are form behave differently when they come in contact with water.



[edit on 9-4-2010 by zzombie]



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 02:05 AM
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Again, complete junk chemistry...

If you read further on Lenntech's information page, you will learn what I previously posted. Iodine is not soluble in water, and yes, it does not usually occur elemental in nature. So, how does iodine react with water...it doesn't. That's why it's added as a soluble iodide species to get iodine. This is pointed out by Lenntech. This is the oxidation that you referred to and didn't understand. No iodites form...pure garbage.

I'll go back to 6th grade chemistry class as I'm a humble student.

[edit on 9-4-2010 by ibiubu]



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 02:22 AM
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Originally posted by pteridine
reply to post by zzombie
 


Actually, iodide ion I- reacts with elemental iodine, I2 to form triodide ion I3-. This is the brown iodine solution you see in water. Iodine is not soluble in water.
Ingesting this solution will likely damage your internals, more or less, and is not recommended. As has been stated, iodide ion as potassium or sodium iodide is a safer way to poison yourself.


See the last post for my reply on that.

There is a lot of reading to do if you are interested in getting to the bottom of this.

There is extensive research done on excessive iodine intake.
The main proponent of this is Guy Abraham, a medical Doctor. His research debunks the the so called wolf-chaikoff effect of iodine.
www.optimox.com...


In one study to determine the optimal dose of iodine, women supplemented with 12.5 mg elemental iodine daily showed increased urine levels of mercury, lead, and cadmium after just one day.11
www.townsendletter.com...





[edit on 9-4-2010 by zzombie]



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 02:38 AM
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reply to post by Nightflower
 


Thanks for the thread Nightflower.

Have you noticed any significant health gains from using this stuff?



If you have trouble finding the right iodine, search for Lugol solution. It is pretty cheap, a bottle with 60ml cost me around 15$ and i only need 8 drops a day to get 50mg.


Isn't Lugol solution, the stuff you give to aquarium fish?

Is the stuff marketed at fish owners, the same stuff sold in health food shops (at 3-4 times the price)?

Cheers.



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 02:46 AM
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Originally posted by ibiubu

If you read further on Lenntech's information page, you will learn what I previously posted. Iodine is not soluble in water, and yes, it does not usually occur elemental in nature. So, how does iodine react with water...it doesn't. That's why it's added as a soluble iodide species to get iodine. This is pointed out by Lenntech. This is the oxidation that you referred to and didn't understand. No iodites form...

[edit on 9-4-2010 by ibiubu]


Nope your the one pushing complete junk chemistry, since you don't understand equilibrium. your opinion is garbage when it comes to changing the laws of equilibrium.

Iodine is slightly soluble in water not to huge extent, but it is.

Go back to the link and re-read it "Water solubility of iodine is determined by temperature (20oC) and pressure (1 bar), and is relatively low"

Relatively low does not mean insoluble, as you stated.

You say no hypoiodites form BS... it is in an equilibrium as was pointed out by the link.



[edit on 9-4-2010 by zzombie]



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 02:53 AM
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Originally posted by Blaine91555
reply to post by Nightflower
 


The number one cause of Hyperthyroidism is to much iodine in the diet.



While your statement is incorrect, iodine is not helpful to people with hyperthyroidism.

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 03:30 AM
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reply to post by Nightflower
 

Betadine contains about 10-12% providone-iodine.

I have been applying it to my skin a couple of days each week for a more than a year now.

I spent alot of time in the sun when a kid and have some ketatotic lesions (pre-cancerous) on the back of my hands and arms.

I used to have to have to have them frozen off, leaving scars...
...but since using iodine they have been just falling off just leaving untanned new skin.

In support of this you can watch Tullio Simoncini speaking at the 36th Annual Cancer Convention Los Angeles Aug 29 -Sept 2, 2008

A patient talking about curing his Basil Cell Carcinomas on his head is on Part: 2 about 2:50 miniutes in...
...and a patient using iodine to treat Melanoma at 6 minutes.



This is exactly my experience with the keratotic lesions...
...and frankly I don't care what those claiming medical crdentials say...
...I have personal proof that it works.




posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 04:38 AM
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reply to post by Nightflower
 


Nightflower.....

Prescriptive medical advice should not be issued flippantly.

May I please ask you to explain your qualifications & experience pertaining to this topic of iodine ingestion?

Many thanks
Maybe...maybe not



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 05:31 AM
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excellent thread. my opnion exactly.
i was having serious chemo when i first found out about idiodine being used to treat cancer - with success - in rats.

i was so furious that no one told me - none of my doctors.

then i read a study that wakame seaweed in lab tests performed better at killing cancer cells than 5 flouricil a chemo drug i had.

this started off my interest in alternative cancer cures; and also my distrust of mainstream doctors. as a result of this first article on idione that i read, i have changed my diet, see a chinese doctor; etc; stopped my cancer hormone treatments; and feel a lot better than i did when being treated by the doctors. i felt like i was on a slipperly slope to death when having chemo.

so far im doing okay; and emotionally, and as far as outlook on life goes, im a thousand times better since i went alternataive...



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 05:41 AM
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How do I know how much iodide is in my organic seasalt? It does not tell me how much but the label did say they 'maximize magnesium and iodide'.

I also think it is safe to say that we cannot have a straight answer until we have seen studies done. There are people who swear by iodide here and some who are just plain skeptic, everybody has their own say in it but it will not be put to rest until official studies have been made. Have there been?

[edit on 9-4-2010 by eLPresidente]



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 05:47 AM
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reply to post by ImaginaryReality1984
 


ImaginaryReality1984... in both your replies you have shown common sense and intelligence. I was going to reply to the OP but you have pretty much covered it... So all I will say is...

People, read ImaginaryReality1984's replies and do not take medical advice from untrained people whose only experience in medicine is what they have read on the internet... IT CAN BE DANGEROUS!!



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 05:51 AM
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reply to post by eLPresidente
 


yes there have. perhaps the 'sceptics' should do some actual 'research' they may find themselves less 'sceptical'.


yeah, lazy people, instead of bullying people about their qualifications, go on line and look up the studies yourself. then make your own mind up.

[edit on 9-4-2010 by rapunzel222]



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 06:00 AM
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Originally posted by rapunzel222
yeah, lazy people, instead of bullying people about their qualifications, go on line and look up the studies yourself. then make your own mind up.

I've done one better than that.. I went and had a thyroid storm and my heart almost almost gave out. I had tests done and went to see specialists who had been studying their prospective fields for a dozen years.

..or maybe I should disregard all that and start overdosing on iodine based on some random person on the net who claims to have been studying this for a whole six months?



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 06:22 AM
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Originally posted by spitefulgod
Can I call the OP Dr Death?? You sound like a salesman for some Iodine company.... and I'm OK thanks since I drink plenty of milk and eat a few yogurts a week. As for anyone else I can only say, if your skin is healthy then you're usually healthy.

If you're planning on changing any deity supplement then do a quick search for #supplement# overdose. Although it would be funny to see some guy in A&E one day with chronic stomach cramps being asked "why did you takes these pills?" and replying "some guy on the Internet told me too" he he he


Dairy is anything but a good source of iodine. Iodine is used to clean dairy cows teets before milking, but it's wiped off and hardly but a drop ends up in a milk.



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 07:01 AM
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reply to post by zzombie
 


Okay now...

Iodine is not solube in water. They report slight solubility due to the presence of 5 ppb average in waters (yet they mention ppm recordings too). 5 ppb is the low limit of detection for inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy that is universally used today to derive this number. Therefore, they did not factor out the instrument resolution. It is not soluble in water.

The ions you're so fascinated by...triodide is what forms when an alkali based iodide is dissolved in water. So solubility of iodine in any aqueous solution is the solubility of the iodide ion, not the iodine. Triodide (sp?) is the favored ionic state in an aqueous solution and there is nothing in the water to drive a reaction to create hypoiodite. There is a hypochlorite species due to water treatment that should not interfere with the stability of the trioidite.

I'm puzzled why they even mention the reaction the more that I looked at it. To state a potential reaction that is equilibrium is a statement of nothing. The water is at a ph of 7 so no reaction can occur (i guess the fancy pants scientists like in "equilibrium"). Because it's drinking water, pH should not be a factor. So, if you're comfortable, it's in equilibrium with hypoiodite and many other reaction products that it won't form because it's in equilibrium. What's confusing is that (even at ambient temp/atmos press), you would need electrolysis to dissociate the water molecule. I don't see any other way...just ask the hydrogen fuel cell guys about water...a tough nut to crack.

If they understood water at Lenntech, they wouldn't state that iodine does not occur in nature. Two paragraphs later, they state that iodine is found naturally in rivers and streams. Actually, it's not iodine, it's an aqueous solution of triodide.

Okay I'm done now, let the insults begin...wait, let me get my coffee first...

[edit on 9-4-2010 by ibiubu]



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 07:02 AM
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I see everybody's awake...oh yeah, 8am EST.



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 07:06 AM
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reply to post by eLPresidente
 


So it's an alkali salt, magnesium iodide. Still results in iodides and magnesium is an alkali metal like potassium. Now we get into labelling issues...i can't remember, but I don't think the FDA will let them list levels and relationships to RDA's. Apparently they are too busy to take care of us taxpayers.

I'm not recommending anyone take it or what levels...if you are curious and would like to, talk to your doctor. I talked to mine and he felt it was fine and will monitor me.

[edit on 9-4-2010 by ibiubu]

[edit on 9-4-2010 by ibiubu]





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