Solar Activity and Earthquakes

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posted on Aug, 6 2010 @ 11:16 AM
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Thanks. Great info on this thread.

Here's some to add to it.

USGS Website

Are Earthquakes Really on the Increase?



A partial explanation may lie in the fact that in the last twenty years, we have definitely had an ncrease in the number of earthquakes we have been able to locate each year.


Since earthquakes remain consistent in number, then one could assume their cause is also a consistent force. I believe they key to predicting earthquakes is here with us on Earth and not in space.




posted on Aug, 6 2010 @ 11:23 AM
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reply to post by whoshotJR
 

Huh.
Sunspots are caused by the Earth zapping the Sun.
I wonder if Ezra Mizrahi is aware that the Sun rotates and if how his ideas account for that.

[edit on 8/6/2010 by Phage]



posted on Aug, 6 2010 @ 11:29 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Yeah.... I'm more interested in what factors his modeling program looks at from the sun to the earth correlation he says he has found a link with.

With everything I have tried to research the best correlation I have found is the theory of solar minimums and earthquakes. Even that one seems to have some holes though.



posted on Aug, 6 2010 @ 04:09 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by Lil Drummerboy
 

Sort of.

I assume you're talking about the EIT images. These images are taken in specific ultraviolet wavelengths, each "targets" a temperature range. The longer the wavelength the lower the temperature. The temperature of the Sun's atmosphere gets higher as you move away from the "surface" (the photosphere) so in effect, we are looking at different levels of the atmosphere.

In the EIT images we do not see the surface of the Sun, where the sunspots actually are. We see the region above the sunspots. The magnetic activity above the sunspot increases the temperature of the material above the sunspot. So, unlike the sunspot itself (which is cooler than the rest of the surface), the region in the atmosphere above it is hotter than the surrounding area.
Ok ,
so in knowing this, could it have an increased radiation effect to the earth?



posted on Aug, 6 2010 @ 04:31 PM
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reply to post by Lil Drummerboy
 

The outbursts of energy from the sun (solar flares) can affect "space weather". In particular it can lead to higher levels of ionization in the ionosphere. But that high energy radiation (UV and above) is absorbed and never reaches the surface of the Earth. That is why the sensors are on satellites, it can't be seen from the ground.

[edit on 8/6/2010 by Phage]



posted on Aug, 6 2010 @ 04:43 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 
I think I understand that , but I guess my question about sunspots is being a hotter spot on the sun, could it be directing more solar heat at earth from the spots themselves?



posted on Aug, 6 2010 @ 04:48 PM
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reply to post by Lil Drummerboy
 

"Heat" does not travel through space. Only radiation does.
Or I guess I'm missing your point.

[edit on 8/6/2010 by Phage]



posted on Aug, 6 2010 @ 04:56 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by Lil Drummerboy
 

"Heat" does not travel through space. Only radiation does.
Or I guess I'm missing your point.

[edit on 8/6/2010 by Phage]
Yes you are correct and I may just be presenting this in a confusing manor.
Let me put it this way.
Is is possible that sunspots would cause warmer temps on earth



posted on Aug, 6 2010 @ 05:21 PM
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reply to post by Lil Drummerboy
 

Ah. Now that you mention it I should have realized what you were getting at.
It would be infrared radiation which would heat the Earth's atmosphere and the surface. Just as the visible light we see from the Sun originates from deeper than the ultraviolet, the infrared radiation originates from the level beneath that. What do we see when we look at the infrared radiation from the Sun? The sunspots are "cooler", so they themselves do not increase infrared radiation.


There is a lot of speculation about how the solar cycle might affect climate. Like just about everything in the field there is a lot of conflicting data. The overall output of the sun does vary with the solar cycle but the amount of change is less than .5%. Trying to link that small of a change to global temperatures becomes problematic but there are a few theories that come up with some possibilities. It is definitely not as simple as "the Sun gets hotter so the Earth does too".

[edit on 8/6/2010 by Phage]



posted on Aug, 6 2010 @ 05:41 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 
OK so here is where i am going with this,
Understanding the jury is not out on this theory yet ( as far as I am concerned)
I am speculating that with the possibility of sunspots creating slight increases in radiation, that with the earth absorbs more radiation at the core. This in turn heats magma which causes greater friction due to crustal expansion.

So, as the data may not show a direct correlation between sunspots and earthquakes, it may be delayed as it takes a while for heat to transfer.



posted on Aug, 6 2010 @ 06:38 PM
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Lets just break it down to it's most simples-est form.

1 We are a moving body in space.

2 We are heated and cooled in space.

3 We are being pulled by the milky way thus gravity.

4 The central black hole has a affect on us.

5 Earth quakes are not small events no matter how small, an earth quake is the effect not the cause.

6 What ever the cause is it must be big enough to affect the planet at scale.

7 Inter expansion or contraction on a global scale is consistent to the movement of our solar system.

8 All local planets to earth play a roll in the cause of earth expansion and contraction with gravity.

9 What event out side of the this solar system could be the cause of our earth quakes.

10 How do we know if when we have a earth quake that the other planets are not having one at the same time.

11 As all things being equal what ever effects earth on a planetary scale bing earth quakes there should be an equal effect on all other planets.

12 No one has looked or found the sings that can distinguish the correlation of outside events being the effect to cause earth quakes on planet earth.


Time to think out side the box, don't you think!




posted on Aug, 6 2010 @ 06:46 PM
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reply to post by Lil Drummerboy
 

Ok, great. Maybe a tiny change in solar radiation heats magma miles beneath the Earth's surface (somehow). But what's the point? If there is no direct correlation, what difference does it make? Does it help us predict earthquakes? How much of a delay? Maybe the earthquakes we see today were caused by nuclear testing in the 60's.

What's wrong with the idea that tectonic activity causes earthquakes? That it is the result of internal influences? I don't understand why people "want" earthquakes to be the result of solar activity.

[edit on 8/6/2010 by Phage]



posted on Aug, 6 2010 @ 10:10 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 
well nevermind Phage.
guess it was a mistake to talk with you about this



posted on Aug, 7 2010 @ 12:31 AM
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reply to post by Lil Drummerboy
 

Why? I'm sorry if I offended you but the point of ATS is discussion.

I don't see much reason to believe than an increase in solar activity or particular incidents of solar activity result in seismic activity. I am defending that position. If you have reasons to believe my arguments are not valid please tell me why. I've learned a lot in my time on ATS, a lot of it as a result of doing research to back up my position and a lot of it as a result of being pointed to other areas of research which I hadn't considered. I've often found that I have to adjust my way of thinking about things. But I do admit, it takes more than hunches to cause me to do so.



posted on Aug, 7 2010 @ 12:42 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Lots of the graphs seem inversely related.

There was an old comic that had terries and fermies throwing contests to see who could create the biggest quake. Scrooge's money bin was right above the action.

Disney, of course. I prefer Herge for his tongue in cheek commentary.

Just shoot the ugly one's; it's simple, you'll see.

Herge also featured some interesting space themes, and of course, once centered around oil. Everyone got really big hair.

Now, roll you terries...



posted on Aug, 14 2010 @ 03:04 AM
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The point is not that sunspots 'cause' earthquakes but that there is a correlation between low sunspot activity and earthquakes. Therefore it could be that whatever causes the sunspots is linked to earthquake activity.



posted on Oct, 25 2010 @ 11:01 AM
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An excellent thread to preempt the "Today's 40% chance of solar storm activity is directly related to the recent earthquakes ad volcanic activity in Indonesia" argument.



posted on Oct, 26 2010 @ 01:47 PM
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Bump. Very good thread to read during this period of heightened solar activity.



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 01:24 PM
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With a little more time, I could translate this article that I've written last year: Systemic solar risk, law of power and earthquakes
Even in french, I think that the pictures are interesting:







edit on 13-3-2011 by MichaelV because: Update link
edit on 13-3-2011 by MichaelV because: Update link



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 01:31 PM
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if everything in the universe breaks down to frequency, energy and vibration.

it is only logical to assume that if the sun "farts", we "burp".

speculation runs in all directions, that is why its called science and not religion.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 






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