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Kyrgyzstan protesters storm state media offices

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posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 07:05 PM
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reply to post by MikeboydUS
 


Bingo yup ya nailed it




posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 07:06 PM
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Originally posted by MikeboydUS
Interesting pic:

This is an opposition fighter



Note the holographic reflex sight on his weapon.

That is an American made sight from Eotech, they cost around $400 US dollars. They cannot be legally exported outside the US. They are used by special operators, private contractors, and some foreign special operations groups.



It is interesting, also notice the tan on these two men, been South lately gentlemen?

I also noticed this same man holding the AKS-74 in the BBC footage and it struck me as unusual when he took a shot from behind a tree, a single shot and his posture was not that of an amatuer, after taking the shot, he performed a fleeting glance at the camera.

My suspicion, as wild as it sounds, is that we may indeed be looking a NATO / Russian undercover SF right here, in some 'psuedo ops' role.



[edit on 7-4-2010 by Skellon]



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 07:08 PM
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Ok i'll give ya the scope,, nice but the tan,,ehhh might be reaching,, but what about the rest ,,parka,, hat,, glasses, reg issue or????



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 07:08 PM
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Originally posted by MikeboydUS
That is an American made sight from Eotech, they cost around $400 US dollars. They cannot be legally exported outside the US. They are used by special operators, private contractors, and some foreign special operations groups.


Would US be so foolish as to arm the opposition with weapons that are not locally available even if it is indeed supporting the uprising? I don't think so. From what I gather the opposition has gotten all of its weapons by confiscating them from the police, or by stealing them from military caches. Perhaps a copy of the Eotech sight by made in Russia or China is used by Kyrgyz forces.

I am no arms expert, but I have seen a very similar looking sight at a Russian arms show. I do not recall the manufacturer though.

Also I seriously doubt that US is behind the protestors. Russian news appeared to be rather optimistic that Bakiyev is ousted, and that was evident in Putin's public address.


By the way is the picture definitely showing the opposition fighters, or could it be the police in civilian clothes? There have been lots of reports about the later.

[edit on 7-4-2010 by maloy]



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 07:08 PM
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double post


[edit on 7-4-2010 by maloy]



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 07:11 PM
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reply to post by pause4thought
 


I'm glad I'm not the only one confused. Guess we should remember it is wikipedia. It sucks, because I really don't know about that region and now I am even more mixed up



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 07:13 PM
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People who stand up for basic freedoms, for control over their destiny and culture. When will the entire world realise this is possible? That individuals can stand for what they believe in, not what foreign superpowers tell them to choose?



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 07:17 PM
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reply to post by Skellon
 


Also look at the muzzle brake on the other rifle. That is a quiet control type brake. Also American manufactured.

There are some other modifications on the rifle, but I'm still matching them up.

The magazine on the AKSU appears to be polymer mag, instead of the standard metal mag.

[edit on 7/4/10 by MikeboydUS]



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 07:18 PM
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Originally posted by Dimitri Dzengalshlevi
People who stand up for basic freedoms, for control over their destiny and culture. When will the entire world realise this is possible? That individuals can stand for what they believe in, not what foreign superpowers tell them to choose?


I would like to think that neither Russia nor US have anything to do with this revolution. Given the history if CIS states it is a complicated matter however. There is always some external sway with so much at stake for everyone.

By the way, I wonder where Bakiyev is now and where he will go after this is over. He can't remain in Kyrgyzstan, and where he will go may hold some clues as to who supported whom.



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 07:21 PM
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Ok this may get a little heated,, ok so other guys got Lebanon sorry since the last time isreal was told to stop,, its now completely Muslim, ok then Turkey kicks out all the non-muslim generals, ok so thats two, now Karazan says he's swithching sides, thats three countries gone since Isreal was told too stop,, hello who is winning this war? meanwhile were in Afg for what?? drugs ya ok so we ALL know that big deal, but your cannot defeat the AFganis in there own country its been tried over and over so hey world lets give yhem there due, hey we all like the movie 300 right??? and remember Rocky 8000 lol damn they were our friends were seen who there were for real,, common give them a rest for a while,, and get on to more important things like i dont know pick one,,,

Sorry,, slowly breath,,thats it,,,



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 07:22 PM
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Originally posted by maloy

Originally posted by Dimitri Dzengalshlevi
People who stand up for basic freedoms, for control over their destiny and culture. When will the entire world realise this is possible? That individuals can stand for what they believe in, not what foreign superpowers tell them to choose?


I would like to think that neither Russia nor US have anything to do with this revolution. Given the history if CIS states it is a complicated matter however. There is always some external sway with so much at stake for everyone.


I agree. I have always believed in a control struggle over two superpowers, and the third power that is created out of this conflict: the people's power. It is not easy to make a civilian population mobilize and actually fight, but when it happens, it is decisive.

Because of your area of expertise within this region, do you think that all "rainbow revolution" countries will revolt against their American puppet governments? Was Georgia ever a part of this?



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 07:24 PM
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CSIS wow im humbled



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 07:31 PM
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Originally posted by maloy
Would US be so foolish as to arm the opposition with weapons that are not locally available even if it is indeed supporting the uprising? I don't think so. From what I gather the opposition has gotten all of its weapons by confiscating them from the police, or by stealing them from military caches. Perhaps a copy of the Eotech sight by made in Russia or China is used by Kyrgyz forces.

I am no arms expert, but I have seen a very similar looking sight at a Russian arms show. I do not recall the manufacturer though.

Also I seriously doubt that US is behind the protestors. Russian news appeared to be rather optimistic that Bakiyev is ousted, and that was evident in Putin's public address.


By the way is the picture definitely showing the opposition fighters, or could it be the police in civilian clothes? There have been lots of reports about the later.

[edit on 7-4-2010 by maloy]


I don't think the US would give the opposition that kind of gear.

Your right about the Chinese, they can copy anything.

I havn't seen any pictures of government forces using those modified rifles. If they came from the government, they didn't originate with police or regular military. A more likley source would be presidential bodyguards.

From what I understand they are opposition forces.

I still wouldn't be surprised if some outside help was involved.



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 07:31 PM
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Why are they having inflation in Kyrgyzstan? What is being bought and sold suddenly there. The dollar has not inflated as much as we thought it would. The tarp funds are supposedly sitting there is it 700 billion as a big slush fund, even though it is already part of the national debt and we are paying interest on it to the banking cabal behind the FED. But this money supposedly hasn't been spent and therefore is not causing the massive inflation that we should have seen by now. But Krygyzstan is suffering from that inflation. Are they recruiting mercenaries in Krygyzstan, inflating their money? Maybe these actually are some of the tarp funds.



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 07:35 PM
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Forget the money angle that set of dominoes already started,, this is different,it just might be there is a new "we the people" and they just might be everywhere.



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 07:37 PM
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Originally posted by Dimitri Dzengalshlevi
It is not easy to make a civilian population mobilize and actually fight, but when it happens, it is decisive.


When similar protests by the opposition happened in Georgia last year, they were quickly put down. I guess it depends on how much power the government yields. A police state can allow even the most unpopular leadership to cling to power for a long time.



Originally posted by Dimitri Dzengalshlevi
Because of your area of expertise within this region, do you think that all "rainbow revolution" countries will revolt against their American puppet governments? Was Georgia ever a part of this?


They won't necessarily revolt, but I think there will be a reversal sooner or later in all cases, simply because political trends are always in cycles. Georgia was a part of it, when Saakashvili came to power during rose revolution. And we are talking about the Bush Era color revolution, not the revolutions of the early 90's in some Eastern Europe nations which were also given a symbolic color. All of the Bush era "revolutions" have many similarities, including unstable replacement leadership and sizeable opposition.

Ukraine already saw a clear reversal, with Yanukovich replacing Yuschenko, thankfully without any violence and by democratic means. Kyrgyzstan has been showing signs of a reversal starting in 2007, which is why the current riots are not a huge surprise to anyone. Georgia saw many riots, some turning violent, against Saakashvili last year. I have no doubt that Saakashvili's days in power are numbered as well. We'll have to wait and see if the power transfer in Georgia will as violent as in Kyrgyzstan, or potentially even more so.

In Azerbaijan there were signs of a forming color revolution during 2008, but it didn't get anywhere.

[edit on 7-4-2010 by maloy]



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 07:40 PM
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Originally posted by pause4thought
I take it that you support the revolution wholeheartedly. Are you from the region under discussion? Do you then think the government was so corrupt it had to be removed?


I second this query. I (after reading these posts and numerous news articles) am still unclear as to what these revolutionaries are all about. Is it anti-American sentiment or anti-Russian, pro-Democracy or pro-Communist, pro-Pepsi or anti-Coke?

The more I read the more conflicting and confusing information I get. If someone could please distill the basics down I would really appreciate it.


[edit on 7-4-2010 by passenger]



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 07:49 PM
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Originally posted by passenger
Is it anti-American sentiment or anti-Russian, pro-Democracy or pro-Communist, pro-Pepsi or anti-Coke?

The more I read the more conflicting and confusing information I get. If someone could please distill the basics down I would really appreciate it.


Try pro-Kyrgyz. Maybe pro-Cthulhu.

Believe me, it is confusing even for those who followed the events in Kyrgyzstan for years. There is no concrete evidence yet on any direct foreign involvement. The most likely case is that the opposition will try to remain neutral in respect to foreign relations for the time being. Here is the summary of known facts, so make your own conclusions:


The opposition is a coaliation made up of different side, including supporters of Russia, of the US, and those who are neutral.

Ousted President Bakiyev replaced the pro-Russian Akayev in a revolution in 2005. Bakiyev was first pro-US, then pro-Russia in early 2009, then pro-US again in mid 2009.

Based on Russian government press releases, Russia is happy about Bakiyev being overthrown. Western news sources are cautious about the events, but have criticized Bakiyev in recent past.

The leader of the opposition has voted to allow the US air base to remain in Kyrgyzstan before. Most likely they are playing both sides.

[edit on 7-4-2010 by maloy]



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 08:08 PM
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An interesting take on the events:

KYRGYZSTAN: IS PUTIN PUNISHING BAKIYEV?




As President Kurmanbek Bakiyev confronts a political crisis in Kyrgyzstan, he is not getting any help from Moscow. If anything, the Kremlin appears intent on turning up the heat on the embattled Kyrgyz leader.

Gasoline and diesel prices are now set to rise sharply in Kyrgyzstan after Moscow suddenly slapped new customs duties on refined petroleum products being exported to the Central Asian nation. Prices for refined products could rise as much as 30 percent, stoking fears that inflation might further destabilize the already troubled Kyrgyz economy.

On April 1, Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin terminated the preferred customs duties that Kyrgyzstan, as a member of the Eurasian Economic Community (the EurAsEC), had been receiving on Moscow’s gasoline and diesel exports. The apparent justification for the move is the fact that the EurAsEC is being eclipsed by a new Customs Union, comprising Russia, Kazakhstan and Belarus. The Customs Union is set to become fully functional this coming July.





Many political experts in Bishkek believe Moscow is punishing Bakiyev for his administration’s failure to evict American forces from the Manas air base, outside of Bishkek. In what most observers saw as a quid pro quo, Moscow promised a $2.15 billion aid package in February 2009 on the same day Kyrgyz President Kurmanbek Bakiyev pledged to close the base. The Americans, however, remain at Manas. [For background see the Eurasia Insight archive].

On April 6, a mass protest that turned violent in the provincial capital of Talas, northwest of Bishkek, appeared to usher in a general political crisis in Kyrgyzstan. The demonstration was apparently triggered by popular discontent over price hikes for heating and electricity. [For background see the Eurasia Insight archive]. The inflationary threat posed by the new Russian duties certainly stands to increase the degree of difficulty for the Bakiyev administration as it strives to contain the unrest.

Bilateral Kyrgyz-Russian relations have nosedived in recent months. After publicly criticizing the way the first tranche of its $2.15 billion aid package was used, Moscow in February postponed $1.7 billion intended to help construct the Kambarata-1 hydroelectric station. "This [the new export duties] is a special decision by Russia. It is one of the steps for punishing Kyrgyzstan for disobedience in the geopolitical arena. The first step was stopping the rest of the Russian loan, and this is the next," said Zamir Osorov, an investigative journalist with the MSN newspaper in Bishkek. "This will be very unpleasant for Kyrgyzstan."



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 08:14 PM
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reply to post by MikeboydUS
 


Very good eye I noticed that as well.


This is a very interesting development.




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