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Lost city in Syria predates the wheel

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posted on Apr, 6 2010 @ 10:40 PM
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April 06, 2010

Archaeologists find evidence of copper trade and social elite.

A prehistoric town that had remained untouched beneath the ground near Syria for 6,000 years is now revealing clues about the first cities in the Middle East prior to the invention of the wheel.

The town, called Tell Zeidan, dates from between 6000 B.C. and 4000 B.C., and immediately preceded the world's first urban civilizations in the ancient Middle East. It is one of the largest sites of the Ubaid culture in northern Mesopotamia.

Now archaeologists from the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute and their Syrian colleagues are studying the town, which sits below a mound in an area of irrigated fields at the junction of the Euphrates and Balikh Rivers in what is now northern Syria.

www.msnbc.msn.com...


This 7-inch-tall female figurine is from the Ubaid period and is made of baked clay.


Amazing find in Syria, they are finding more artifacts that predate the wheel, looking forward to more updates on this discovery.




posted on Apr, 6 2010 @ 11:08 PM
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Nice find. If it weren't for the two little circles representing breasts I would never have even thought that to be a female figurine, though. Still, it's likely better than anything I could make! :p I wonder why the figurine doesn't have a pregnant belly; most of the ancient female figurines I've ever seen had big breasts and were pregnant, owing to the prevalence of fertility gods and cults.



posted on Apr, 6 2010 @ 11:20 PM
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reply to post by DragonsDemesne
 


I was looking for something else on Msnbc and clicked on the science and tech page and this popped up, I noticed the picture first and thought what is that, my first impression was not that of a female torso, looks like it's very well preserved.



posted on Apr, 6 2010 @ 11:41 PM
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Thank you Aquarius1 for the information. Anything pertaining to early recorded civilization is interesting for me. My family tree on my father's side can be traced backed to the Ghassanids that were in Syria. I'll pass this article on to my family members...Peace



posted on Apr, 6 2010 @ 11:54 PM
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reply to post by Aquarius1
 


check this out

oi.uchicago.edu...
oi.uchicago.edu...

note the dates. 5500 BC and 5000 BC. are they saying these people made these items without a potter's wheel?



[edit on 6-4-2010 by undo]



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 12:04 AM
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Originally posted by undo
reply to post by Aquarius1
 


check this out

oi.uchicago.edu...
oi.uchicago.edu...

note the dates. 5500 BC and 5000 BC. are they saying these people made these items without a potter's wheel?



[edit on 6-4-2010 by undo]

I dont think the origin of the potter's wheel has really been dated? Its not impossible that they had that tech, even that early. Doesnt need to be a wheel in the wheel sense either.

Besides, a wheel is just a slightly more effiecient way of walking around the pottery and molding as you go


[edit on 7-4-2010 by merka]



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 12:07 AM
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reply to post by merka
 


unfortunately, the fact someone is saying it leads to someone else quoting it later, while trying to explain away some out of place artifact.



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 12:16 AM
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You can't be serious.
I myself have done exhaustive studies on the wheel. Even I have no idea
how many times it has been reinvented. The number I'm sure would boggle the mind.

(note my avatar)

I like your thread. SnF Now I'm going to read it.



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 12:17 AM
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reply to post by merka
 


Thank you for the links, this may have been done by sculptor opposed to using a potters wheel. We can't assume they used tools.



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 12:21 AM
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reply to post by merka
 


The artifact that I posted looks more primitive then the examples in your links but hey what do I know.



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 12:24 AM
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reply to post by randyvs
 


Duly noted, also the sunglasses, think they have been reinvented numerous times, had no idea they were so old.



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 12:35 AM
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reply to post by randyvs
 


that's what i thought as well.

that stuff looks like a pottery wheel product.

this guy (a machinist) says he recognized lathing tool usage in ancient egypt, before the lathe was said to exist:
www.theglobaleducationproject.org...



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 02:29 AM
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reply to post by Aquarius1
 


Exciting find, and thanks for posting without adding, it was a ancient astronaut civilisation


The depiction of the 'goddess' is common in prehistoric societies, and this stylistic version of the divine feminine mother, looks kosher to me. The female form is one of the most depicted in ancient artwork


Cheers Zazz.



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 02:50 AM
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How do they KNOW that's a 'female' figure?

It looks like a horse's face to me.



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 02:57 AM
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I wasn't aware we knew when the wheel was invented.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 03:37 AM
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reply to post by Aquarius1
 


Neat find Aquariusone

This town has an earlier date . Maybe no elite stamps but impressive non the less. It has been my favorite for years.




Original Article: Jarmo: A Village of Early Farmers
Robert Braidwood in Antiquity Volume 24:189 (1950) PreHistoric Qalat Jarmo in Iraq

Excavations at Jarmo. Iraq's most important Neolithic site and the earliest agricultural community in West Asia. The inhabitants of Jarmo lived in square ...

ancientneareast.tripod.com/Qalat_Jarmo.html - Similar


Library of Congress # CC 1 A7



Iraq’s most important Neolithic site and the earliest agricultural community in West Asia. The inhabitants of Jarmo lived in square multi-roomed houses build of pressed mud with mud-ovens and baked-in clay basins sunk in the ground. They ate with bone spoons -- sewed with bone needles and their stone spindle-whorls show that they could weave or plait flax and perhaps wool. Pre-ceramic Jarmo was first dated by radiocarbon tests on snail shells at about 4750 BC but further tests on charcoal gave higher figure and circa 6750 BC is a more likely date ...


There is an excavation on the Russian/ Chinese border of the burial of some pretty interesting chariot folks that may pre date the Mesopotamian wheel.

I will see if I can find the info.



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 03:43 AM
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Originally posted by Aquarius1
reply to post by DragonsDemesne
 


I was looking for something else on Msnbc and clicked on the science and tech page and this popped up, I noticed the picture first and thought what is that, my first impression was not that of a female torso, looks like it's very well preserved.


I didn't see a female figurine either. Must have been a guy who came up with that.



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 03:51 AM
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Originally posted by undo
reply to post by Aquarius1
 


check this out

oi.uchicago.edu...
oi.uchicago.edu...

note the dates. 5500 BC and 5000 BC. are they saying these people made these items without a potter's wheel?



[edit on 6-4-2010 by undo]


Some of the most elaborate and thin ware pottery is made exclusively by hand.
The use of the potters wheel should be well documented as it is very apparent in the pottery or shards that are excavated. I can't tell if the objects in your link were produced on a wheel or not. It is very nice looking.
The American Indians never developed the wheel. Some of their pottery is magnificent as well.
They also had not developed to the glazing stage.



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 03:59 AM
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reply to post by Donny 4 million
 


No big deal but interesting.


A burial with warrior, horses and chariot... from China! ... However, it is likely that the first true chariots were developed on the Eurasian steppes, as shown by the burials discovered along the border between Russia and Kazakhstan, .... line and deal with as many as possible before they could wheel and return. ...

www.touregypt.net/featurestories/chariots.htm - Similar

Radio-carbon dating of horse remains interred with chariots now indicates that this ancient grassland culture, called by archaeologists the Sintashta-Petrovka people, began using chariots around the beginning of the Middle Bronze period, two hundred years before the first evidence of Middle Eastern chariots. (Based on the style of the artifacts found at the burial sites, Russian researchers previous dated the Sintasta chariots to two centuries after the first evidence of chariot use in the Middle East. More accurate radio-carbon testing is required to settle this dispute.)



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 04:09 AM
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These earmarks are the essence in human development IMO.
Stone--agriculture/ceramics--BEER --Wheel-natural metals--smelting metal--machines-electricity--PLASMA TV--ATS

That's right beer--wheel
Who the hell would be the first guy to ride a horse without getting a little oiled first.

[edit on 7-4-2010 by Donny 4 million]

[edit on 7-4-2010 by Donny 4 million]



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