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Most important gear

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posted on Apr, 5 2010 @ 08:07 PM
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Map and compass, protractor and slide ruler.

More than two ways to start fire.

Water, water purification tabs, water filtering system.

And there's a lot more.
As Ask the Animals said, there are just over a quadrillion threads on this topic.

Ask the Animals has posted some good ones, and look into a now-banned member,
Northern Raider.
NR's profile, look through his threads

He had lists on every scenario I could imagine.




posted on Apr, 5 2010 @ 09:00 PM
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It is safe to say nearly every regular contributor to the Survival forum has either started or participated in one or several "gear threads".

I honestly do not mind new ones from time to time because it allows for others to see other perspectives and supportive arguments over why a particular piece of gear as a different way of doing things.

Long ago I had mentioned a survival journal as such an item. Quite the controversy of lugging a small diary sized book filled with notes and sketches on how to do different things such as traps for different occasions and so on. In time, it became a regular item to many lists.

Same could be said for my "fishing" vest instead of a regular large rucksack. At the mention of ease of maintaining the "grey man" illusion, it gained some respect. THE 5.11 Tactical Vest is good for the problem of counterbalance, however that 5.11 logo is a neon sign for those that know what it is.

Got to say that a slide rule is a new one on me, but very valuable to those that know how to properly use one for calculations. I guess some would find a speed square handy for similar reasons.

Heck I even thought I might have went too far when I made this thread, I am still a little surprised how well it was received.

[edit on 5-4-2010 by Ahabstar]



posted on Apr, 5 2010 @ 09:53 PM
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In addition to the normal gear already mentioned:

A large pack of zip-ties in various lentgths up to 24": helps with building shelters, weapons, etc.

A small box of extra-thick kitchen garbage bags: ponchos, storage, etc.

Disposable surgical gloves: lots of stuff you might not want to touch barehanded.

Several spools of dental floss: not just for teeth, tough string in a compact form.

Oil of cloves for toothache.

Oil of cinnamon: antibiotic.

Antihistamines and anti-itch ointment.

Spices: bland food is demoralizing.

Superglue: emergency wound closure.

Salt: essential for survival.

A book, preferably unread.



posted on Apr, 6 2010 @ 11:24 AM
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Originally posted by Asktheanimals

Originally posted by captaintyinknots

Originally posted by Asktheanimals
This subject has been beaten to death but let''s go one more time. Why no firearms on your list? That would be the first thing I'd grab (both rifle and a pistol), followed by water purification system and a knife.
Nearly everything beyond that can be foraged, made or stolen.

no weapons because, as you said, the subject has been beaten to death.

This is about gear. As far as I can see, there is no thread pertaining to gear only. If Im wrong, the mods can remove it.



This is just the thread I did on Bug out bags, one of many such threads - www.abovetopsecret.com...



this thread wasnt meant to be about bug out bags, or things like that. It was supposed to be about the type of gear one might carry on his or her back, and the type of things that those with survival experience have found to be the MOST useful.

I was hoping some military, police, and the such would contribute the things that they felt were the most important pieces of gear.

Sorry if you've read too many of them.



posted on Apr, 6 2010 @ 01:21 PM
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Most important quick grab items, excluding a firearm, nice topic.

There are some good ideas on here, some odd. WD-40 wouldnt be my first thought.

Break down what you need to survive, and pack light for it.

Water. Purifier, iodine, small vessel to boil it in. Also some water enhancers are a good idea. Cheap and light.

Fire. I like the Blastmatch, but to each their own. So, blastmatch, wetfuel, charred cloth, battery and steel wool as a backup.

Shelter. Simple and light. Paracord, lightweight tarp.

Food. 100 lb test line for trot lines. 8 lb for actuall fishing. Minor gear, some hooks, sinkers, treble hooks for trot lines. Small lightweight snares for game, knife obvious. Fixed blade prefered.

Other important items. Axe or hatchet, for shelter, defense, chopping through ice, etc... Small military shovel for pit traps, water, etc...

Due to the lack of firearms, a small crossbow with 6-10 bolts wouldnt be a terrible idea, birds rarely go through snares, and as near as I can tell, all birds are safe to eat.



posted on Apr, 6 2010 @ 02:22 PM
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Originally posted by captaintyinknots

Originally posted by IandEye

Originally posted by captaintyinknots
A few more(sorry, not trying to bump my own thread, just keep getting ideas):
-duct tape
-can of wd40
-vaseline


i dont wanna know what you were thinking when you came up with those three..........
something involving the gimp, perchance??


hilarious


duct tape:because if you cant fix it, you can duct it
wd40:great for fishing, great for weapon maintenance, great for firestarting, great for about 1000 purposes.....
vaseline:chapped lips, insulation, and most importantly, you will not find a better firestarter than some cotton dipped in vaseline.
000000

nice- can you elaborate on the vaseline and cotton firestarter? havent seen that one. im just not usually one to carry vaseline- there are so many more expensive, smelly jellies on the market (tigerbalm is my favorite, actually)
thanks bro
=)



posted on Apr, 6 2010 @ 02:27 PM
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Originally posted by IandEye

Originally posted by captaintyinknots

Originally posted by IandEye

Originally posted by captaintyinknots
A few more(sorry, not trying to bump my own thread, just keep getting ideas):
-duct tape
-can of wd40
-vaseline


i dont wanna know what you were thinking when you came up with those three..........
something involving the gimp, perchance??


hilarious


duct tape:because if you cant fix it, you can duct it
wd40:great for fishing, great for weapon maintenance, great for firestarting, great for about 1000 purposes.....
vaseline:chapped lips, insulation, and most importantly, you will not find a better firestarter than some cotton dipped in vaseline.
000000

nice- can you elaborate on the vaseline and cotton firestarter? havent seen that one. im just not usually one to carry vaseline- there are so many more expensive, smelly jellies on the market (tigerbalm is my favorite, actually)
thanks bro
=)


Anything that is a petroleum based product(vaseline, chapstik, many lotions) will work. chapstick and vaseline are the two that I have experience with. Cotton, paper, tinder(wet or dry)....any of them flame up fast and hot when covered in these things and ignited.

I'm not sure about tigerbalm. I love the stuff for dry skin, but i honestly dont know if it is petroleum based or not.



posted on Apr, 6 2010 @ 03:08 PM
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Personally, I rely a lot on my backpacking equipment. In addition to what has been mentioned:

MSR Whisperlite multi-fuel stove runs on white gas, unleaded fuel and kerosene.

Old PUR hiker Pro filter now Katadyn brand along with an extra filter and purification tablets.
Duct tape of course.
RipStop nylon repair tape is handy for anything.
Kevlar thread for a variety of repairs.
Swimmers towel (highly compact and absorbent)
Quick Clot packs added to a well stocked first aid pouch
topo maps and compass
Tinder (cotton balls soaked in vaseline for wet weather, as well as some dryer lint for the drier days)
Widgy Bar
Petzl headlamp or any variant is a must have when setting camp at dusk
etc etc...



posted on Apr, 6 2010 @ 03:39 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


actually carpenter pencils are good very, but i will also carry the oil wood chalk.
even after a year of heavy rain its still sitting on the fence.(i cant get that stuff off)



posted on Apr, 6 2010 @ 04:01 PM
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Everyone forgot the most important.

A change of clothes, gloves, and sleeping gear. In plastic. If it floods, rains, etc. you need clean dry clothes.

You must stay warm and dry to maximize your energy level.

I have two bags one at home and one in the car.

Carmex, allergy pills, ibuprofin (pain and anti-infammitory). everything to keep you mentally alert and ready for anything.



posted on Apr, 6 2010 @ 04:09 PM
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Originally posted by whattheh
Everyone forgot the most important.

A change of clothes, gloves, and sleeping gear. In plastic. If it floods, rains, etc. you need clean dry clothes.

You must stay warm and dry to maximize your energy level.

I have two bags one at home and one in the car.

Carmex, allergy pills, ibuprofin (pain and anti-infammitory). everything to keep you mentally alert and ready for anything.


Thats why i put an entire underarmour suit(pants, shirt, hood) on my list. They dry ridiculously quickly, they keep you warm or cool, they wick water away from the skin.



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 08:23 AM
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Originally posted by captaintyinknots

Originally posted by whattheh
Everyone forgot the most important.

A change of clothes, gloves, and sleeping gear. In plastic. If it floods, rains, etc. you need clean dry clothes.

You must stay warm and dry to maximize your energy level.

I have two bags one at home and one in the car.

Carmex, allergy pills, ibuprofin (pain and anti-infammitory). everything to keep you mentally alert and ready for anything.


Thats why i put an entire underarmour suit(pants, shirt, hood) on my list. They dry ridiculously quickly, they keep you warm or cool, they wick water away from the skin.



what's this "under armor" stuff....? long underwear or something more tactical?



posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 09:47 PM
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reply to post by IandEye
 


www.underarmour.com...

They have a lot of different styles; compressed, loose, long, short, and I'm sure they have some top of the line stuff but it will cost you. This is what you see all the professional athletes wearing.

I was wondering how many people get all their cargo around? I like to travel light and have a small day military pack. I am getting a nylon hammock to really free up space.





[edit on 7-4-2010 by kyle43]



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 03:09 PM
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Originally posted by kyle43
reply to I am getting a nylon hammock to really free up space.


Ive actually given some thought to a hammock recently. One with a smaller webbing so it could also be used as a net if needed.

Lightweight, rolls up small, keeps you off the ground, and if it was a multitasker, all the more useful.



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 03:21 PM
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I forgot to mention socks: lots of socks, enough to change frequently so you don't get fungus infections on your feet. Nothing will kill you quicker than having your feet go bad on you (ok, a slight exaggeration, but still...).

And I just acquired a 3' blowgun: no ammo problems and easily carried and used. There's lots of plants around here that have different poisons that can be extracted and used relatively easily.



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 03:56 PM
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reply to post by apacheman
 


I have 2 30" Blow guns with different ammo for different game. Spikes, broad-heads, darts, etc. Perhaps getting the glow in the dark style will be useful after dark, if you have the rechargeable lights to "charge" the darts. But still worth a mention.

You could also make some fire-starter style items. Try mixing magnesium shavings with cotton balls and wax. Place in a mold of some sort, allow to cool. Don't use too much wax or the cotton will be totally in-cased, but it would be water-proof. You would just need a knife to cut some of the tender. Magnesium burns hot and while wet.

Might be a good idea to start storing seeds as well, just in case you need to grow your own food. Learn also to make and use a fertilizing latrine, and purifying water (large barrel with layers of sand - charcoal - sand - charcoal and then boil the water afterward).

Fishing line is also good for stitching, not just fishing, keep some in your first aid kit with a full kit of sewing needles (Full kit here has not just the "normal" needles, but the furniture needles and canvas needles that are almost perfect for stitches).

Salt and Spice would be a luxury, but Mrs Dash is compact and can be used in all meals. Rock Sea Salt would be a better choice in my opinion, larger chunks that can be ground down for the little meals and the larger can be used for all sorts of preserving and wound tending, if you can handle the pain.

Throwing knives that are a solid metal piece would be good for spears. (yes I know, no weapons on this thread sorry)

paratrooper tool might be worth a mention as they have pliers, knives and all sorts of tools, in addition to the fixed-blade tool. Military style shovel.
Good walking Stick or Quarter Staff - good to have a 3rd leg to prevent tripping and the unnecessary breaking of bones.

Hiking or steel toed boots that are a size or two larger with double or triple pairs of worn socks one pair being wool to wick water away.
Wool Poncho, rain Poncho

Other First Aid Items
scalpel or kit of exacto knives
Snake Venom kit
bandages
bandannas or tourniquets
Rags (when band-aids cannot be found)
big bottles of pain killers
neosporin type of substance (anti-biotic)

be familiar with making your own antibiotics (mold from rye gives penicillin, that type of info)

Anything I missed?



posted on Apr, 13 2010 @ 12:08 PM
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Originally posted by IandEye

Originally posted by captaintyinknots

Originally posted by whattheh
Everyone forgot the most important.

A change of clothes, gloves, and sleeping gear. In plastic. If it floods, rains, etc. you need clean dry clothes.

You must stay warm and dry to maximize your energy level.

I have two bags one at home and one in the car.

Carmex, allergy pills, ibuprofin (pain and anti-infammitory). everything to keep you mentally alert and ready for anything.


Thats why i put an entire underarmour suit(pants, shirt, hood) on my list. They dry ridiculously quickly, they keep you warm or cool, they wick water away from the skin.



what's this "under armor" stuff....? long underwear or something more tactical?


Under armour is lycra-type material that was developed for athletes. They make hot and cool gear, and all of it is made to wick moisture away from the skin.

In my opinion, it is warmer than long underwear, more lightweight, flexible and comfortable.

They make everything from pants to shirts, to hoods, to socks and shoes. I'd highly recommend checking it out.



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 07:54 PM
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reply to post by captaintyinknots
 




I haven't seen anyone mention "barbed wire cutters" for emergencies, especially if you plan on being mobile.



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 01:39 PM
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Originally posted by captaintyinknots

Originally posted by IandEye

Originally posted by captaintyinknots

Originally posted by whattheh
Everyone forgot the most important.

A change of clothes, gloves, and sleeping gear. In plastic. If it floods, rains, etc. you need clean dry clothes.

You must stay warm and dry to maximize your energy level.

I have two bags one at home and one in the car.

Carmex, allergy pills, ibuprofin (pain and anti-infammitory). everything to keep you mentally alert and ready for anything.


Thats why i put an entire underarmour suit(pants, shirt, hood) on my list. They dry ridiculously quickly, they keep you warm or cool, they wick water away from the skin.



what's this "under armor" stuff....? long underwear or something more tactical?


Under armour is lycra-type material that was developed for athletes. They make hot and cool gear, and all of it is made to wick moisture away from the skin.

In my opinion, it is warmer than long underwear, more lightweight, flexible and comfortable.

They make everything from pants to shirts, to hoods, to socks and shoes. I'd highly recommend checking it out.


oh yeah- sure i know that stuff well. it's so lightweight and warm in the winter.....i was hoping there was an OTC bullet-proof longjohn's company



posted on Apr, 17 2010 @ 07:40 PM
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Originally posted by manta78
reply to post by captaintyinknots
 




I haven't seen anyone mention "barbed wire cutters" for emergencies, especially if you plan on being mobile.


Canister of refridgerant maybe?




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