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GEOMAGNETIC STORM Warnimg

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posted on Apr, 5 2010 @ 04:56 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Phage, normally I am always starring your comments as they help me see through many things... however you seem to be a bit snappy on this one.

You don't see any possibility that earthquakes could be related to solar activity and geomagnetic storms?!

I mean come on... critical thinking does NOT rule out this hypothesis.

1. The Earth and the Sun are intricately connected via magnetic fields...
www.geomag.bgs.ac.uk...

2. The Earth's magnetic field or magnetosphere is generated by the dense magnetic metals in the earths core... via the Dynamo Theory

The dynamo theory proposes a mechanism by which a celestial body such as the Earth or a star generates a magnetic field. The theory describes the process through which a rotating, convecting, and electrically conducting fluid can maintain a magnetic field over astronomical time.


3. The tectonic plates reside ON TOP of those dense 'rotating, convecting, and electrically conducting' fluids.

I mean come on... you know this. How can you rule out the affect of geomagnetic storms on tectonic activity?

Given those three points it seems like we cannot rule that out.

In fact, I think it seems more LIKELY than not.

As above, So below.





posted on Apr, 5 2010 @ 04:57 PM
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I have propechy and its that Katla in Iceland is going to wake up this weekend.

There is no sign, but i have feeling in my nose about this



posted on Apr, 5 2010 @ 05:06 PM
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The SSRC, the leading independent research center in the United States on the subject of the next climate change to a period of extended cold weather, has concluded a detailed comparison of solar activity with major earthquakes and volcanic activity. It has found a significant correlation exists between periods of reduced activity by the Sun, previously linked to cold climates are now identified with the most disastrous earthquakes in the United States and major volcanic eruptions around the globe.

Link: www.redcounty.com...

There are a number of studies that show a possible correlation between the sun and natural disasters on Earth.

However, the order is wrong in this particular case.

If you are looking to the sun to have caused the earthquake in California, the event on the sun would have taken place several days before the earthquake in California.

In other words, the activity on the sun now would bring effects to us a couple or few days later.

The theory in the OP is sound, but not the timing. This theory can be attributed to other earthquakes and volcano eruptions however, but one must look prior to the event here to witness the cause from the sun.

At least that's how I understand it. But I'm no expert.



posted on Apr, 5 2010 @ 05:19 PM
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reply to post by beebs
 

I haven't seen any convincing evidence that earthquakes can be triggered by geomagnetic storms. I have seen evidence that they are not. Here for example:

When it is considered that the aftershocks are also included in the number of earthquakes which have been taken into the comparison, in the area within the given coordinates, there is no finding that shows that the earthquakes occur as a result of a triggering under the effect of geomagnetic storm. In order to mention such a finding, more number of earthquakes should occur with percentages that correspond to geomagnetic storms. This is not verified by the results.

www.ciencias.unal.edu.co...

You are confusing cause and effect. The theory is that convection within the outer core causes Earth's magnetic field, not that the magnetic field causes convection.

The tectonic plates do not reside on top of those 'rotating, convecting, and electrically conducting' fluids. They reside 1,800 miles above them, on top of the shallow mantle. Between the shallow mantle and the lower mantle is the transition region. It is here that the movement of the tectonic plates occurs. The lower mantle is not liquid, nor is the D" layer below that.

No, I don't think it is likely that geomagnetic storm activity (which is actually very weak in comparison to the Earth's magnetic field in general) affects the liquid outer core of the Earth nor do I think it is likely to affect the transition region.

[edit on 4/5/2010 by Phage]



posted on Apr, 5 2010 @ 05:55 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
You are confusing cause and effect. The theory is that convection within the outer core causes Earth's magnetic field, not that the magnetic field causes convection.

The tectonic plates do not reside on top of those 'rotating, convecting, and electrically conducting' fluids. They reside 1,800 miles above them, on top of the shallow mantle. Between the shallow mantle and the lower mantle is the transition region. It is here that the movement of the tectonic plates occurs. The lower mantle is not liquid, nor is the D" layer below that.

No, I don't think it is likely that geomagnetic storm activity (which is actually very weak in comparison to the Earth's magnetic field in general) affects the liquid outer core of the Earth nor do I think it is likely to affect the transition region.
[edit on 4/5/2010 by Phage]


Yes I know, the theory is that the spinning core creates the magnetic field. Right? I don't think I'm confusing cause and effect ('twould be a grave day)...

If you want to debate semantics, then I guess the tectonic plates do not reside directly on top, but they are still 'above'. That aside, the point I was trying to make is that the tectonic plates are between the sun and the dense substance inside the earth that generates our magnetosphere.

I hardly think that is insignificant.

Like someone else stated earlier in the thread, the moon affects the tides here on earth. Admittedly, that is due to the effects of 'gravity', whatever that turns out to be. But the analogy is a nice one. Perhaps the geomagnetic activity from the sun coupled with the position of, say, the moon or other celestial bodies would be able to affect tectonic activity?

I think only time will tell. But wouldn't it be amazing if we found out that the precession was caused in part by the dense gravity at the center of the galaxy? We on earth are in such a complex system... and we are so very small. We simply cannot rule out the theory that the Sun is responsible, perhaps in part, to tectonic activity on earth.





posted on Apr, 6 2010 @ 02:53 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Someone who puts a cause ahead of an effect is not demonstrating much critical thinking.

I think you mean 'after an effect', don't you? 'Ahead of' usually means 'before'.


NO, I don't "know it all".

As we see. But then, who does?



posted on Apr, 6 2010 @ 02:58 AM
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reply to post by Astyanax
 

Before. After. What's the difference in the end.
You know what I meant.



posted on Apr, 6 2010 @ 03:00 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by Smell The Roses
 

So you're saying an increase in the solar wind which was caused by coronal holes (no CME, no flare) several days ago affected the Earth before it got here?

Interesting.


[edit on 4/5/2010 by Phage]


Don't be so blunt about everything. Maybe the same reason that caused the solar storm caused the earthquake? Think outside the box. This would mean that indeed, when the storm left the sun is the same moment that the earthquakes happened on earth.

If you still have trouble picturing it, think of an earthquake undersea. It can be felt immediately at shore if it is big enough, but the tsunami wave would hit the shore several hours later.

[edit on 4/6/2010 by above]



posted on Apr, 6 2010 @ 03:02 AM
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reply to post by above
 

It wasn't a solar storm. It was coronal holes.

The coronal holes did not appear at the same time the earthquake occurred, they occurred days before.



posted on Apr, 6 2010 @ 03:59 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


This is so far out pseudoscience what we are talking about, that debating such details was it a coronal hole or solar storm is not really meaningful, but ok, i was wrong with that term.

All i wanted to say was that as long as you part take in a controversial topic like this, you should have your eyes open to even the most far-out ideas like maybe the fabric of space we are travelling through at this time is the reason for both the occurance in the sun as for the occurance (earthquake) here on tellus.

Playing with ideas is really nice and usually the way to discover something novel. Taking those ideas too serious is the way to madness


[edit on 4/6/2010 by above]



posted on Apr, 6 2010 @ 06:32 AM
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IPS Australia issued a geomagnetic alert at 11.25 UT...K-Index has reached 5 in the Australian region, a minor geomagnetic storm is in progress...

SpaceWeather.Com shows K-Index in the northern hemisphere at 4 and has not issued a geomagnetic alert...

Looks like we're in for another night/day like yesterday


[edit on 6/4/2010 by Retrovertigo]



posted on Apr, 6 2010 @ 07:09 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by Smell The Roses
 

So you're saying an increase in the solar wind which was caused by coronal holes (no CME, no flare) several days ago affected the Earth before it got here?

Interesting.


[edit on 4/5/2010 by Phage]




I don't really see why not. I mean, havent you felt the air change right before a strong thunderstorm? Why wouldn't it apply here?



posted on Apr, 6 2010 @ 08:44 AM
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reply to post by WhiteDevil013
 



cause nothing screams "I know it all, and you're beneath me" like a good sarcastic response to a genuine inquiry.


Awesome, well said!

I always find the universe has its way, despite what us humans think!






posted on Apr, 6 2010 @ 11:19 AM
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reply to post by above
 

You might be surprised at the ideas that cross my mind. But without evidence and reason, ideas are only that.



posted on Apr, 6 2010 @ 11:35 AM
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reply to post by ddarkangle2bad
 


This topic was already posted on April 5, 2010 at 10:17AM Eastern Daylight time.



posted on Apr, 6 2010 @ 07:21 PM
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Here is a theory that I found. Solar Earthquake Evidence
Saturday, 06 February 2010 19:58
After a solar storm strikes the Earth a geomagnetic storm erupts. The increased magnetic field strength of the magnetosphere pushes down on the ionosphere, which pushes against the oceans. It is due to the electromagnetic properties of sea water that the oceans become temporarily heavier. The extra heaviness of the sea water, coupled with the daily tidal forces of the Sun and Moon cause greater than normal forces to press against both the eastern and western boundaries of the Pacific Plate, but more so the western boundary in the South Pacific Islands region.

Below are earthquake maps showing global earthquakes of magnitude 5 or greater for the five days following a geomagnetic storm. Notice the clear pattern of quakes in the South Pacific Islands region along with activity around the Pacific Rim. There is also a clear pattern of earthquake activity along the fault running from Greece to the Pacific Plate.

The five dates selected below were the first five dates I found for geomagnetic storms and were selected completely at random. There is a list of solar storms where you can choose a date and check the earthquake database yourself to verify this theory. www.terracycles.com... go down and over on the left side and go to Earth-Sun-Galaxy once there it will say Earth ( 13 Articles )
Solar ( 2 Articles ). In Solar you find the article about Geomagnetic & Space Observations or go to earth one and go to 10 Solar Earthquake Evidence or 11 Solar-Earth Connection maybe this will help!!



posted on Apr, 6 2010 @ 08:35 PM
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Maybe we cannot rule out that geomagnetic storms affect tectonic activity...:

Breaking: Earthquake Sumatra, Indonesia Mag 7.8

So that is what, 2 earthquakes within the time frame?

Correct me if I'm wrong.




posted on Apr, 7 2010 @ 02:11 AM
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I doubt any power outages were caused by this geomagnetic storm...


Well, you are wrong.We had two about the time I thought they would occur.

Right near sunset as this part of the planet rotated and caught the "wave" coming from the sun.



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