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How long has marketing been this way?

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posted on Apr, 1 2010 @ 03:44 AM
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I have noticed the way things are marketed lately and am wondering if someone can provide insight on it. This brilliant strategy started in politics/religion as a divide and conquer technique that I refer to as a cult mentality we aspire to.

So far I have noticed the following (anyone that knows about these companies and commercials will see what I am referring to).

PC vs Mac vs Linux. I had noticed it for awhile with PC and Mac but the Linux people have joined in. I visited their website to learn about a new OS the other day and was hit with many anti Microsoft posts inside the tutorial. I was wondering why their users had this mentality and an hour in the tutorial showed me why.

AT&T vs Verizon. Theres an App for that and theres a map for that. It hasn't heated up yet but the smears are there and the division among users will surely ensue.

Burger King vs McDonalds. Both have their share of fanbases and have even got me and my brother in law into arguments over fries. I can't believe I was sucked in. /facepalm

360 vs Wii vs PS3 vs PC. Console wars have always been there because someone is gonna get shortchanged. As a PC user I am used to it though. I love games personally and it has never bothered me but there is definitely some ferocity in the fans right now.

Star Wars vs Star Trek. Well, what more can I say. Both are marketed extremely well to be as old as they are. They constantly pick up new fans each day.

CNN vs FoxNews vs MSNBC. This is the butter right here. You can go to each station at any point during the day and see the shots being fired at the other station. Journalistic integrity I guess.

Coke vs Pepsi. I remember a blind taste test commercial a few years ago.

If you have more I would love to hear about them. I am just now putting the pieces together with these marketing schemes and I may be behind but how long has it been going on. It is a brilliant strategy but maybe they should think about laws regarding calling your competitor out. Someones gonna end up getting killed over the type underwear they wear. Glad you guys looked at the post and hopefully it has enlightened at least one of you.




posted on Apr, 1 2010 @ 03:58 AM
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I was just think ing of a thread about marketing, so i'll chip in here. I was just watching TV here in the UK and it's funny how they use different regional accents to promote certain products. For example a Northern accent is used to promote online Bingo. now a northern accent is considered a more "working class" accent in the UK so fits well with promoting a game like Bingo, traditionaly a working class past time.

This may seem a strange example, but it reinforces and embeds in the conscience that northern people are more working class.

maybe I'm reaing too much into it




posted on Apr, 1 2010 @ 04:01 AM
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I can only speak for the gamers.

please understand there are die hard fanboys who are fans of the corporations, the games they make and their consoles. Almost like a religion. Now all consoles have pros and cons. Personally I would say their like shoes, try each one before buying one and pick the one with the best fit.


Some basic things people say about the consoles:

Xbox 360:

Positive: Marketplace and online works all the time, though some games NOONE is ever online. Also it breaks alot!!!

PS3: people like that they can watch downloaded content and blu rays, the game library is very SMALL which is a HUGE complaint. online is free but is known to be glitchy.

Wii: toughest console out there, it works and its reliable and people like it. Cons are that it doesnt do online with as many games as the other consoles.

Like I said its all about what your looking for and hope you find the right one for you. Honestly the PS3 and 360 are more powerful then they need to be. No developer has been able to use their power so dont go on stats at all.



posted on Apr, 1 2010 @ 04:10 AM
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Some of the dualities you mentioned stem from former oligopolies in which two or a few companies emerged in certain industries as top dogs. For a long time the competition between them was very small as they could settle such issues with each other.
But over the last 30 years competition and the ability to stay on the cutting edge has intensified greatly especially with advancements in technology. So former oligopolies have broken down into every-man-for-himself scenarios.
At the same time, promoting dualities like coke and pepsi, mac and windows, Democrat and Republican also keep third parties marginalized and distant competitors.



posted on Apr, 1 2010 @ 04:10 AM
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I dont have an example for you but i have to agree with you.

Its all part of a cleverly constructed psychological war. Aimed at making you beleive that you are somehow better off using one brand as opposed to another.

Many years of cutomer evaluation and market research have went in to it.

Id love to say it has no effect on me, even though i know what there doing. Unfortunately ive feircely defended my choice to go Xbox over PS3 many a time. So it looks like they've got me lol.



posted on Apr, 1 2010 @ 04:17 AM
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reply to post by ventian
 


There is a term known as Pauline Christianity that is used, usually as a pejorative, to describe the teachings of Paul as being radically different than that of Jesus', and considered by some to be a corruption of Christ's teachings. Acts of The New Testament serves as an historical account, and chronicles the disputes between James, then "Pope of the Church", and Paul. It was Paul's willingness to stray from "normative" Judaism.

Paul was recruiting new members to the Church and zealously so. He was the ultimate salesman, who promised a better religion to pagans who either worshiped another god, or were pantheistic. In selling the new Christian Church, it is argued that Paul would claim elements of other religions as part of Christianity in order to close the deal. This description of Paul is my own and there are scholars who argue that Paul was anti Judaic and pro Romanization, which could mean he had other motives from moving away from Judaism. There are those who claim that while Christianity is based in a large part on the teachings of Jesus, Paul invented it.

Paul may or may not be the reason Christmas is celebrated on the 25th of December to fall more in line with pagan beliefs, he may or may not be the reason the virgin birth myth is a prominent part of the teachings of Christianity, but this myth has a universal appeal, and Jesus in many ways parallels the mythic Hercules, who was also the son of a male god and human mother. Beyond that similarity, both struggled through 12 strenuous labors, and both eventually ascended to heaven to be seated at the right hand side of their father.

Paul wasn't necessarily selling mythology, he was selling religion, and whatever people wanted to worship seemed to be A-Okay with Paul, what he did was convert people to worship as such with in the church he was selling. He was arguing that Christianity was a better religion than the one they currently had and did what was necessary to close the deal.



posted on Apr, 1 2010 @ 12:10 PM
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Thanks for the replies guys.



posted on Apr, 1 2010 @ 12:18 PM
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reply to post by ventian
 


One of the first rules of sales(which is all that marketing is) is 'kill the competition'. Price doesnt matter, if you can destroy the customer's faith in the competitor.

I used to work for a VERY high end home improvement company. My job was to do preset, in home demonstrations and to close a sale.

my presentations usually lasted 1 1/2-2 hours. At least 1/3 of that time was spent either talking down about the competitor, or telling the customer why MY product was better than theirs.



posted on Apr, 2 2010 @ 01:51 AM
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Originally posted by captaintyinknots
reply to post by ventian
 


One of the first rules of sales(which is all that marketing is) is 'kill the competition'. Price doesnt matter, if you can destroy the customer's faith in the competitor.

I used to work for a VERY high end home improvement company. My job was to do preset, in home demonstrations and to close a sale.

my presentations usually lasted 1 1/2-2 hours. At least 1/3 of that time was spent either talking down about the competitor, or telling the customer why MY product was better than theirs.



With that said you obviously know a good bit more on the subject than I do. Do you believe there should be laws in place from mentioning you competitors names?



posted on Apr, 2 2010 @ 02:26 AM
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Originally posted by captaintyinknots
reply to post by ventian
 


One of the first rules of sales(which is all that marketing is) is 'kill the competition'. Price doesnt matter, if you can destroy the customer's faith in the competitor.

I used to work for a VERY high end home improvement company. My job was to do preset, in home demonstrations and to close a sale.

my presentations usually lasted 1 1/2-2 hours. At least 1/3 of that time was spent either talking down about the competitor, or telling the customer why MY product was better than theirs.



The only thing I can add to this and to answer the question in the thread title is that, it's been like this since at least the birth of 'modern advertising' in the 1800s. 'Kill the competition' has occurred in live demonstrations of products, probably since there were markets, but in mass communications sense (before screen media this was obviously print media) this rode off the back of industrialisation (which facilitated the mass manufacturing that allows consumerism) and the rise in the literacy during this era.

There was a lot of transposition of existing advertising techniques ("Mr Wunderkind's Patented Hair Tonic and Restorer is much better than any known rival and only half the Price. Also cleans pots, pans and shoes!)" as well as new ones exploiting the increase in literacy and changes in printing techniques: large text based hoardings and so on.

What the OP sees is really nothing new at all it's just that advertising trends and fashions often come and go and then come back again. Also, it maybe, for some reason, the OP has only recently become aware of the mechanisms behind advertising and it's 'new' to them but not really new.



posted on Apr, 2 2010 @ 02:59 AM
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This brilliant strategy started in politics/religion as a divide and conquer technique that I refer to as a cult mentality we aspire to.


ventian,
I submit that
this is to give us
the illusion of choice.


David Grouchy



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