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New mars photo wth is this?

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posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 03:59 PM
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Look really closely at the area above the shadow and then look at the edges on the shadow. Is something growing off the edge of this rock? Does rock naturally jut out in narrow spikes like that?
Image link below

www.nasa.gov...




posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 04:07 PM
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Just long shadows of rock and boulders. I cannot detect anything organic here. I can understand someone can see tree shapes in the shadows but no.
Nice picture!



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 04:08 PM
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Hey Nephy,

Could this be the birthplace of the silverback gorillas that roam Mars?



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 04:10 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 04:13 PM
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reply to post by NephraTari
 



Does rock naturally jut out in narrow spikes like that?


Well, yes.

Especially since erosion is a fact on Mars, just as it is on Earth. Not as much liquid water, of course, but still are naturally occuring forces at work. Wind (such as it is) and any frozen H2O, or other substances....

No surprise to see irregular and erose forms in the "geology" of Mars (need new word, "geo" means 'earth'...ahhh...just looked it up. D'oh! Simple, "areology" --- from the Greek for Mars, 'Ares'....)



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 04:15 PM
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reply to post by NephraTari
 


You got good eyes! I do not know what they are. Good find!




posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 04:19 PM
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Long shadows on a downhill slope is all it is...

Cool pic!



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 04:21 PM
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Originally posted by NephraTari
Look really closely at the area above the shadow and then look at the edges on the shadow. Is something growing off the edge of this rock? Does rock naturally jut out in narrow spikes like that?
Image link below

www.nasa.gov...


Yes it does. That is a good example of wind erosion on rock of varying density and hardness. The angle of the sun, along with the degree of slope determines the shadows.



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 04:22 PM
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I don't know about the shadows of spikes...I think those are just shadows of rocks.

But what about those lines below the shadow? All the other "lines", which I'm assuming is some kind of sand duned...at least that is what it looks like to me...they all go in the same direction...pretty much diagnal from top right to bottom left ( / ) on the picture. But there are some smaller "lines" right by the shadow that are perpendicular to those lines...so more of a diagnal from top left to bottom right ( \ ) on the picture. And they almost look like they end at a rock (looks like a rock..or maybe small crater.). Reminds me of the "sailing stones" from death valley.

Anyone see what I am talking about? I'm sure there is an explanation...I'm just new to looking at Mars photos...and that looks odd to me.



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 04:22 PM
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reply to post by NephraTari
 


Here is an example of a mountainous ridge, or "arete", on Earth:



The 'arete' formations we study here on our planet are mostly glacially formed, thus they occur fairly rapidly, geologically speaking. AND, we have much more )and faster) errosive forces here, thicker atmosphere, (stronger winds), much more rain/snow/other precipitation....AND biological influences, plants, animals...all contribute to faster erosion, and 'softening' of sharp forms...

Similar examples, on Mars (however they were initially formed, what processes) will tend to remain longer, and stay 'sharper', with less erosive ifluences at work.

No big mystery, really....also, will depend a great deal on the make-up of the rocks in question --- density, hardness, etc. Granite (or equivalent) versus snadstone, or other 'softer' rock. No way to tell, jsut from a photo. Manned exploration, and on-site study is needed.



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 04:30 PM
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They look like Mars "Blueberries"; an iron rich mineral formed where it might have been water some time in the past. Its been written about quite extensively, one of the best pictures are found here:

Chinadaily article



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 04:33 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 04:36 PM
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reply to post by Acharya
 


No, not really.....those "blueberies", as they're called, are quite small, and scattered on the ground.

The photo you linked is taken from just a few feet away.

The photo the OP is asking about is a shadow cast by a mountainuos ridge....the Sun is fairly low on the horizon, when that photo was taken, and I'm supposing it is a photo taken by the MRO (the spacecraft in Mars Orbit). SO, it is up dozens of miles above the surface.

Compare, please, to similar satellite photos of areas on Earth, especially deserts ringed by mountainous terrain. Photos snapped in early morning, or late evening, when Sun is low on horizon.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Speaking of the MRO, here's the link.

Ahh...this is fun! MORE about the MRO:


Completion of the orbital insertion placed the orbiter in a highly elliptical polar orbit with a period of approximately 35.5 hours.[16] Shortly after insertion, the periapsis – the point in the orbit closest to Mars – was 3,806 km from the planet's center (426 km from its surface). The apoapsis – the point in the orbit farthest from Mars – was 47,972 km from the planet's center (44,500 km from its surface).

en.wikipedia.org...

So, 426 km at closest approach.


On September 29, 2006, MRO took its first high resolution image from its science orbit. This image is said to resolve items as small as 90 cm (3 feet) in diameter.

On October 6, 2006, NASA released detailed pictures from the MRO of Victoria crater along with the Opportunity rover on the rim above it.


AND, finally, the definitive picture of what was called the "face" on Mars, at Cydonia:


Just a trick of shadow, after all.






[edit on 31 March 2010 by weedwhacker]



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 04:47 PM
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reply to post by NephraTari
 


G'day NephraTari

Thank you for posting that interesting picture.

I must agree with the majority of members who have already replied to you.

I believe I am looking at elongated shadows of rocks.

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 04:52 PM
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reply to post by NephraTari
 


If you look at the shadow, it appears that the top is rather jagged and pointy. I think the part that looks like it is growing out is actually pointing upwards and the tips are not in the shadow, but the rest of it is. It reminds me of stalagmites and stalactites



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 04:56 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 05:31 PM
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Originally posted by napster

 


off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 





HAHA Napster wins.

I actually enjoy randomness and wierdness. Was kind of jealous i didnt find it first.

On topic - I think they look ALOT like trees. Can anyone else zoom in?



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 05:44 PM
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reply to post by Zeta Reticuli
 


Nephra...no, not trees.

You may think they resemble trees, but you have to allow for the scale, and the distance of the image, the distance and scope.

Look at those craters....those are impact craters, likelymany thousands of feet (maybe even a few miles) in diameter.

Here, although not an exact representation to compare with the Mars photo, but you can get an idea of a photo of Earth, from a satellite in orbit:



AND, it shows the area taken from ground level, to give a more recognizable perspective.

When examining and interpreting photos from Mars (or the Moon, or anywhere off-planet) you are seeing something that is, in fact, alien to your traditional perspective, and usual assumptions.



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 05:51 PM
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posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 05:56 PM
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reply to post by cripmeister
 


Ahhh...memories....

Slightly different, though. Those "trees", from older thread, were a top-down view of phenomena that were horizontal, and "flowing" (had 'flowed", at one time).

'Nephra's photo link is merely of shadows of rock outcroppings, shadows of the top of a ridge.

Rocks, shadows, on a large plain of sand dunes.



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