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Strange Rock Carving

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posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 02:35 PM
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Originally posted by Phlegmi
Wow cant believe this got 10 pages of replys. IT IS NOT A CARVING, it is a material used by masons to fix defects in cement and rock. You can see that it was a strip and it overlays the circle on left and right sides and it was molded in the middle. Whom ever was doing this did a pretty sloppy job.


Would it not follow that there is some masonry in the vicinity? Also...the OP says it's a rock. Now...creek bed? Part of a structure? Again, I'd say the OP would twig onto that. Being way back in Punkin' Holler, with only the remains of a couple of wood structures in the vicinity, I'd guess this thread ain't dead yet.




posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 02:51 PM
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reply to post by Phlegmi
 


Ridiculous to think this is not a rock carving. Phlegmi below your name it says "thread killer", but weak arguments like it's masonry mumbo jumbo isn't gonna kill a well discussed and genuinly puzzling thread like this one.

[edit on 31/3/2010 by Chamberf=6]



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 03:13 PM
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could be a map. not very portable though. perhaps a boundry stone marking a trible limit. it may just be there to tell pepole that the water was good to drink ?



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 03:31 PM
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reply to post by Chamberf=6
 


It actually looks even more to me like dried up JB weld. You can shape it into anything and when it dries its rock hord. This PIC will give you some idea what it is dried up, remember there are many different kind of epoxys that can be used to perpetuate this hoax.

Or you can keep on believing it was made by faries or maybe even smurfs?



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 03:47 PM
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Originally posted by paratus
reply to post by nenothtu
 


I have ties with locals (PA) whom know alot regarding glyphs:

"I don't know if I've seen that particular one, but the theory is that they are historic, and were either used to leach lye from wood ashes, or tar from pine cones. Thanks for sending it."

this is what he said...
He is president of the Society for Pennsylvania Archaeology and a board member of the Eastern States Rock Art Research Association. He wrote a chapter on the Safe Harbor petroglyphs for the book “The Rock Art of Eastern North America, Capturing Images and Insight,” edited by Carol Diaz-Granados and James R. Duncan, which was published in 2004.



Just a lot of these guys are stuck on the functionaly of rock carvings.

This is not a leach for anything.



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 04:18 PM
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Very very interesting!

It *IS* a new piece, probably carved since the 1960's (for some reason I associate it with "Lord of the Rings" but I would discount that connection). There's no real wear (being in a stream would wear and pound the surface) and there's no patina (the incised marks are a slightly lighter color.)

The image may not be complete-- the sculptor may have planned something more elaborate and not had time to finish it. So I'm leery of making any identification based on the three-branched tree.

I can say that it's not from any Native American culture (again, too new).



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 04:22 PM
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Originally posted by nenothtu

Originally posted by JohnnyCanuck

Originally posted by amari
Suggestion: Go to the location of the Strange Rock Carving and take a

magnetic resonance reading and take a top of the line metal detector

and sweep the area. I will U2U ^Y^

...and if you dig anything up, it immediately stops becoming proof of anything.

Everybody has a little Indy Jones in them...but even he was a looter. If you raid a site, you are a looter. Again, I say resist the temptation, and get the pros involved. Archaeologists are fully aware that in the practice of their science, the database gets destroyed. That is why it is such a meticulous process. I repeat as well, that if a paradigm is to be changed, the process involves a rigorous set of rules and standards. Looting a site immediately disqualifies it from any relevance...and I think you're hoping for more out of this. Thanks again for starting this very interesting thread...and I assume that the 'branches' do not bear any resemblance to the topography, right?


Don't worry, nothing will be dug up by looters. I can't stress strongly enough how dangerous this place is to strangers, and none of the locals who know (by now) about this find have any urge to dig. They know what would be involved. One of my cousins is hell bent on getting archaeologists involved, who will be in this area in a few weeks on an unrelated matter, and most of the rest are equally against it, fearing the publicity involved will bring in a circus of outsiders and gawkers, none of which they're going to put up with.



I knew some guys that were looking into what seemed to an old chimney back in some hard to get to place. They flew over in an airplane and someone shot a hole in it. They tried to get there on foot with the owners ok and some locals ran into them out in the woods and told them to get out anyway and dont come back or they would never be found.

The chimney was suspected of being made long before the area was settled by whites of late. It was very large and odd looking. I saw a picture of it and it was odd but nothing ever came of it.

My kin are actually from down in Boone Co/Logan Co. My GGgf came into Boone in 1824 he had my Ggf late in life as did one of the others so it only puts me 4 back believe it or not. They came up from Stokes co NC. I had 2 relatives killed while "squirrel hunting". I still have relatives living on the old land grants in both NC and WV and they are just simple working folks.

You May Want to Contact or Email......



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 04:22 PM
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Originally posted by paratus
reply to post by nenothtu
 


I have ties with locals (PA) whom know alot regarding glyphs:

"I don't know if I've seen that particular one, but the theory is that they are historic, and were either used to leach lye from wood ashes, or tar from pine cones. Thanks for sending it."


I don't know if I'd agree with him (I would like to see how they think the process was done) -- looking at the "twigs" on some of the branches seem to indicate that a carving of a tree was clearly meant. I would, however, love to see some of the lye leaching stones and to read up on how they were used.



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 04:24 PM
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Originally posted by nenothtu

Originally posted by hoghead cheese

It must have been done fairly recently, because you don't see any algae in the rock cut, but you see it on the parts that aren't cut on the rock.


There IS algae, and moss too, inside the carved channels. It's hard to tell in the pictures, because there is a thin layer of mud or silt in the channels, they are wet, and I reduced the size (and so the resolution) of the picture to get it to fit on an ATS page.

In the full resolution copy of this picture, you can make out algae in the channels vaguely, as a greenish stain on the walls of it.


Algae grows VERY quickly (weeks, even) and so does moss/mud silt. I'd go along with Cheese on the idea that it was carved recently (last 50 years).



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 04:33 PM
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Originally posted by nenothtu

Originally posted by Blaine91555
reply to post by nenothtu
 


I'm now wondering, why does it need to be a symbol at all? Could it have had a function do you suppose. Oddly enough a Whiskey Barrel is the right dimensions on the bottom that the outer rim would seat into that nicely. The little square cutout is just right for the tap or cork. That pattern of the "tree" is often seen in the bottom of old trays to drain liquids.

Do you suppose that it might have been a place in the stream to keep a barrel of water or other beverage cold? The bottom of a traditional Whiskey Barrel is just the right size to fit?

Another thought to muddy up the water.


as I recall oak whiskey barrels, it's probably about the size of the bottom of one. However, the square cutout probably isn't deep enough to accommodate the tap, and certainly not deep enough to accommodate a receptacle placed under the tap.

At one time, there was a moonshine still a few hundred meters up the main hollow, under a large rock. It would have been a lot of trouble to get a full barrel of whiskey down that main hollow, and then up this little side hollow, through the brush, though. Usually, jugs were filled at the still, and carried out by the jug.


In my head the square cutout would be just to accommodate the tap, not to actually use it. Moonshine (not that I've ever had any
) is usually mixed half and half with water to make it palatable. Initially it is nearly pure alcohol.

Just speculation though. The tree pattern could be to prevent the bottom of a keg from forming a bond like a suction cup when placed on the groove, so it would be easier to lift back up after adding water. Just trying to think out of the box.

I did check out whiskey keg dimensions. They were not accurate containers by any stretch. On the top and bottom they are normally in the 21 to 23 inch range depending on the amount of bulge in the middle. With older kegs, each one would be unique but in the same size range.



[edit on 3/31/2010 by Blaine91555]



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 04:51 PM
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reply to post by Byrd
 



Hay Bird.

Those leaching stones were closer to the house or cabin. As they ran fires all winter and cooking year round they had a constant supply of ash and they were not going to drag it all the way down the hill side to work it. Most likely right out the back door somewhere. Thats just my thought.

Making Soap



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 05:16 PM
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Originally posted by kidflash2008
reply to post by spikey
 


I should of stated lawsuits against the property owners, not the OP. We live in a very litigious society nowadays, and even if they are frivolous lawsuits, the owner has to show up in court or risk losing by default.


The plaintiff has to show up in court, too, and that's a sort of rare occurrence in these parts. Litigation is more of a flatlander thing, folks up here deal with their own problems for the most part, without bothering the authorities to do it for them.

Several of the property owners in that area are absentee owners, however.

I can't think of a judge around here anywhere that would award a plaintiff injuries when HE was the one trespassing. he'd be lucky to stay out of jail himself, for the tresspass.

That's assuming he made it back out of the woods to make a complaint in the first place.

I'm not trying to be contentious, I'm just trying to explain that this is a world that you appear to be wholly unfamiliar with, something completely alien to you. Take it from an insider who has walked in your type of world, too (still do - I'm just here on a vacation right now) that any interloper who had the temerity to bring suit when he was in the wrong to begin with would have a VERY rough time of it, if he survived at all.



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 05:19 PM
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Originally posted by zachi
Here is an interesting site from Britian:
www.stone-circles.org.uk...
It explains their symbolism. This is a little more like you stone carving:

This one is Goa. That's India.

This is also from India



[edit on 3/31/2010 by zachi]


The top one is a labrynth, probably from a Celtic area like Ireland or Scotland. I love those things, and have been thinking about making one myself, big enough to walk, out on the ground. Walking them is said to clear your mind and steady your nerves.

This carving branches, but it doesn't have the spirals.

The page you linked to DOES have interesting possibilities, however!

[edit on 2010/3/31 by nenothtu]



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 05:26 PM
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Originally posted by Phlegmi
Wow cant believe this got 10 pages of replys. IT IS NOT A CARVING, it is a material used by masons to fix defects in cement and rock. You can see that it was a strip and it overlays the circle on left and right sides and it was molded in the middle. Whom ever was doing this did a pretty sloppy job.


'Thread killer' my dying fanny!

It IS a carving. I've been to it, felt the stone, ran my fingers in the CARVED channels. It was most certainly NOT molded. It was carved, the main contention being WHEN, and by WHOM. Some say recently, I say it's a bit older, but not necessarily 'prehistoric'.

I went back up to it today, and took more pictures (I included more context in these) and compass readings, which I will post when I get finished going through these replies.



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 06:12 PM
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Alrighty, I'm down to the bottom, so I'll post on today's activity. We went back up to the stone. Here is a long shot of the area, to give you some idea of how steep and narrow the hillsides are on either side of the run:



I've marked the stone with a red arrow.

This is somewhat closer in, with my son, who is 6 feet tall, standing at the upper edge of the stone for scale:



This is looking down on the stone, from the hillside to the east of it:



This is again from above the stone, but this time from the hillside to the west. You can see a large rock ledge just upstream from the stone, on the far side of the stream. The carving is at the bottom of the picture, just to the right of center:



The crevice goes back into the hillside about 12 0r 15 feet, but you have to be flat on your back or belly to get that far back. You can estimate the size at the mouth of it again because my son is in the picture.

No, it's not big enough (tall enough) to contain a still rig.

This is from upstream, about mid-stream, looking downstream, with the rock ledge to the left. The carving is near the center:



This is a compass set directly on the stone, to show it's orientation:



A curious thing about this is that the stone apparently has some magnetic properties. When I moved it off of the stone, and laid it on a log about 5 feet to the southwest to take a secondary reading, it pointed about 22 degrees further east (towards the stone) than it did while directly ON the stone. I presume that means this stone contains some amount of iron, and probably had a different orientation relative to the north magnetic pole when it formed than it does now. Whether that means the stone moved, or the magnetic pole moved (as is known to be happening) or somewhat of both, is anybody's guess.

Here is a view of the cutout to the east (right side of the stone) of the carving, as was requested by someone in this thread:



The circumference is fairly regular, but the bottom of it is very irregular, leading me to think that it may have been chipped out by the freeze-thaw cycle.

This is a closer view of the rectangular cutout on the left side of the circle:



You can see the silting dried in the bottom of it, and the sides of the cut, which are weathered to the same shade as the surface of the stone.

A different angle on the same rectangle:



This is from upstream, showing that there IS a notch at the base of the 'tree' which serves as a drainage for the pattern:



So there IS a drainage in it, and I was wrong when I said there wasn't. Whether it was by design or coincidence I couldn't say.

That's all for today's trip. I took other pictures, but most are redundant enough that I didn't post them. In one of them, I laid a quarter on the carving for scale (Although my uncle took one last trip, I forgot to take a tape measure on this one, DOH!), but didn't post it because I thought it to be redundant. If anyone wants, I can post that too.


[edit on 2010/3/31 by nenothtu]



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 06:23 PM
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With the cut-outs and all, it seems to me that something was supposed to fit on or in the grooves, like a barrel or something. A moonshine still, maybe? Or something used to sift for gold? It's hard to tell exactly, but from the look of the surrounding creek bed, somebody was working there on something. Just a guess.



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 06:23 PM
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reply to post by nenothtu
 


Must agree with you OP.
I know my own Appalachian familys' JB Weld heirlooms only date back to the advent of Wal-Mart.



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 06:36 PM
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Thanks lots OP(!), still in the belief it's a Shield form for Cold Forging Copper -especially as the natural V-shape of the ravine it's in would help with controlling the compression stone, and the creek water being witheld and then released to break it loose afterward also... I'd be interested in what may be found in that nearby recess!



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 06:43 PM
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Originally posted by 23refugee
reply to post by nenothtu
 


Must agree with you OP.
I know my own Appalachian familys' JB Weld heirlooms only date back to the advent of Wal-Mart.


That's a fact, Jack! It's just not hard enough to scratch out a living here, so we frequently go down to the hardware store and spend ALL our hard-earned money on JB Weld, buying enough to take it out in the middle of nowhere and produce beautimous sculptures in it, for no one to see until they trip over it, then camoulflage them as thousand pound stones.

Call it a quirk of our natures, but we might just have way too much time on our hands!

Who need to buy stuff to eat! Our Art must take precedence!

- nenothtu, charter member and founder of the International Bondo Art Foundation



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 06:44 PM
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After seeing those pictures, it seems more apparent to me that this is functional somehow. It clearly held something in place in the middle of the stream and that cutout could be for anything from a tap to a pipe exiting the bottom of something. The tree just looks like drainage ways.

I think the whole idea of symbols or the like is probably a dead end.




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