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More Evidence That Coffee is Good For You

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posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 04:21 PM
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G’day

This small but interesting study appears to be showing that drinking coffee is good for you.

I’m a little surprised the benefits encompass consumption of up to 8 cups of coffee per day.

That’s a lot of coffee…..I’d be climbing the walls if I drank that!




Medscape Today

Coffee Consumption Improves Markers of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress
Coffee and inflammation

March 26 2010

Michael O'Riordan

"We found some evidence of beneficial effects on the lipid profile, but no effects on glucose metabolism," report lead investigator Dr Kerstin Kempf (University Düsseldorf, Germany) and colleagues. "Because subclinical inflammation is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, our results suggest one mechanism that could mediate the reduced risk of type 2 diabetes among individuals who habitually consume coffee for years."

“Writing in the April 2010 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the researchers add that previous studies have shown that drinking coffee protects against developing type 2 diabetes mellitus, possibly through reductions in inflammation, oxidative stress, and favorable changes in the lipid profile.”

____________________________________________________

A small study published this week points again to the beneficial effects of coffee consumption. Researchers showed that drinking coffee led to improved markers of subclinical inflammation and oxidative stress, as well as increases in HDL-cholesterol levels.

"We found some evidence of beneficial effects on the lipid profile, but no effects on glucose metabolism," report lead investigator Dr Kerstin Kempf (University Düsseldorf, Germany) and colleagues."

"Because subclinical inflammation is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, our results suggest one mechanism that could mediate the reduced risk of type 2 diabetes among individuals who habitually consume coffee for years."

Writing in the April 2010 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the researchers add that previous studies have shown that drinking coffee protects against developing type 2 diabetes mellitus, possibly through reductions in inflammation, oxidative stress, and favorable changes in the lipid profile.
Study of habitual coffee drinkers

In this study of 47 habitual coffee drinkers, the individuals stopped drinking coffee for one month. In the next month, they drank four cups of coffee per day, followed by eight cups of coffee daily in the second month. Subjects were relatively healthy, younger than 65 years of age, but with an increased risk of diabetes based on a diabetes risk score.

After the two months of subjects drinking coffee, the researchers observed significant decreases in markers of subclinical inflammation, including interleukin-18 (IL-18) and adiponectin, but no increases in levels of C-reactive protein (CRP). Markers of oxidative stress, on the other hand, were significantly reduced.

"There was a significant decrease in circulating IL-18 concentrations, but no changes in systemic CRP or IL-6 concentrations," write Kempf and colleagues. "We previously identified higher concentrations of IL-18 as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes."
Regarding the lipid parameters, the researchers report that total-cholesterol levels were significantly increased, by 12%, after the second month of drinking coffee. In addition, apolipoprotein A1 levels were also significantly increased. HDL-cholesterol levels were up 7%, from 48 mg/dL to 51 mg/dL, by the end of the second month.

There were no changes in any markers of glucose metabolism. According to the researchers, this "noteworthy" finding might be explained by the short duration of the trial compared with coffee consumption over years in prospective studies. They say the favorable effects on HDL cholesterol should be investigated further.

www.medscape.com...


Kind regards
Maybe…maybe not




posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 04:38 PM
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Thanks for this, now I have an excuse to drink my average 8 shots of espresso a day without my friend telling me my heart is going to explode!



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 04:49 PM
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Originally posted by BellaMente
Thanks for this, now I have an excuse to drink my average 8 shots of espresso a day without my friend telling me my heart is going to explode!


G'day BellaMente

8 espresso's!

That's a fair bit of caffeine.

I'd be feeling a little queezy if I kept up that level of coffee drinking


I guess it effects people differently as in some people feel the stimulation of caffeine more than other people.

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 05:03 PM
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I always thought coffee was one of the greatest things ever (Hence my user name). You have to be careful once you have diabetes though. Having too much coffee can actually raise glucose levels in some cases.

I have type 1 diabetes and I was having a hard time with my blood sugar so I went to the doctor and I found out my high levels were because of too much caffeine (at the time i was having about 16-20 shots of espresso a day). I cut back and my blood sugar leveled out. I still have about 12 shots a day. Mmmmmmm....coffee



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 05:06 PM
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8 cups a day? I had better try to cut back...



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 05:11 PM
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Originally posted by CoffeeGeek
(at the time i was having about 16-20 shots of espresso a day). I cut back and my blood sugar leveled out. I still have about 12 shots a day. Mmmmmmm....coffee


16-20 shots of espresso a day..... Thats ridiculous. I don'y get why people like espresso shots.. Wouldn't you prefer to savour a coffee and drink it slowly?

16-20 shots a day is just plain dumb and idiotic



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 05:15 PM
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reply to post by Nomad451
 


Yeah, just plain espresso is gross; not worth it unless you need a serious burst of jittery energy and fast. If you have time but still need that energy, get a cup of coffee with a shot of espresso in it; that's good stuff. 'specially with strawberry Torani... Mmmmmmm.

Does anyone else absolutely hate when people say "expresso"?



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 05:17 PM
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reply to post by CoffeeGeek
 


G'day CoffeeGeek

16-20 espresso's per day?



That would blow several major gaskets in my head!

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 05:32 PM
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reply to post by CoffeeGeek
 


So you talk a little fast sometimes, then?





posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 05:36 PM
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I dont drink them a shot at a time. I usually put six shots over ice and sip on it over the course of a couple hours. I work in a very busy coffee shop and its very hard for me to "savour" a cup of coffee when there are at least 10 people in line all day. On my days off i normally drink black coffee but only a couple of cups. So is it still dumb and idiotic??



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 05:49 PM
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reply to post by ziggystar60
 


Ahhh seinfeld..my refuge!

Back onto the topic. It's suggesting, with evidence, that decafinated coffee has even greater the effect.




news.bbc.co.uk...

The protection may not be down to caffeine since decaf coffee has the greatest effect, say researchers in Archives of Internal Medicine.

They looked at 18 separate studies involving nearly 500,000 people.

This analysis revealed that people who drink three or four cups of coffee or tea a day cut their risk by a fifth or more, say researchers.

The same amount of decaffeinated coffee had an even bigger effect, lowering risk by a third.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Type 2 diabetes is treated with a healthy diet and increased physical activity



To avoid the worlds ever growing addiction to coffee.....exercise!
Or perhaps walking to the closest coffee machine or fridge is the answer.



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 06:12 PM
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reply to post by Beatrix Kiddo Jr
 


G’day Beatrix Kiddo Jr

That’s very interesting & it puts a different slant on things


Here’s paper from the Dr referenced in the BBC article you posted:



Coffee, Decaffeinated Coffee, and Tea Consumption in Relation to Incident Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
A Systematic Review With Meta-analysis

Rachel Huxley, DPhil; Crystal Man Ying Lee, PhD; Federica Barzi, PhD; Leif Timmermeister; Sebastien Czernichow, MD, PhD; Vlado Perkovic, MD, PhD; Diederick E. Grobbee, MD, PhD; David Batty, PhD; Mark Woodward, PhD
Arch Intern Med. 2009;169(22):2053-2063.

Background:

Coffee consumption has been reported to be inversely associated with risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Similar associations have also been reported for decaffeinated coffee and tea. We report herein the findings of meta-analyses for the association between coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and tea consumption with risk of diabetes.

Methods:

Relevant studies were identified through search engines using a combined text word and MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) search strategy. Prospective studies that reported an estimate of the association between coffee, decaffeinated coffee, or tea with incident diabetes between 1966 and July 2009.

Results:

Data from 18 studies with information on 457 922 participants reported on the association between coffee consumption and diabetes. Six (N = 225 516) and 7 studies (N = 286 701) also reported estimates of the association between decaffeinated coffee and tea with diabetes, respectively. We found an inverse log-linear relationship between coffee consumption and subsequent risk of diabetes such that every additional cup of coffee consumed in a day was associated with a 7% reduction in the excess risk of diabetes relative risk, 0.93 [95% confidence interval, 0.91-0.95]) after adjustment for potential confounders.

Conclusions:

Owing to the presence of small-study bias, our results may represent an overestimate of the true magnitude of the association. Similar significant and inverse associations were observed with decaffeinated coffee and tea and risk of incident diabetes. High intakes of coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and tea are associated with reduced risk of diabetes. The putative protective effects of these beverages warrant further investigation in randomized trials.

archinte.ama-assn.org...


Kind regards
Maybe…maybe not



posted on Mar, 30 2010 @ 12:22 AM
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Originally posted by BellaMente
Thanks for this, now I have an excuse to drink my average 8 shots of espresso a day without my friend telling me my heart is going to explode!



Meh, don't worry about it, love.
Espresso actually has less caffeine than regular coffee.



posted on Mar, 30 2010 @ 01:04 AM
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reply to post by ziggystar60
 


G'day ziggy

Kramer is epic!!!




posted on Mar, 30 2010 @ 02:07 PM
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That's interesting but i'd like to know if it applies to de-caffinated coffee.

Coffee does terrible things to this brain of mine, or the caffeine does. I make mistakes at work, the more caffiene the more I have trouble analyzing what I read. And it absolutely nullifys my awareness. All that wonderful clarity that comes from a night of sleep and detoxing to be taken away first thing in the morning by the casual cup of coffee.

The cons outweigh the pros for me on this one. I like being intuitively aware and optimally functional.


8 cups of coffee is F'n INSANE. Please don't take it to heart people when people imply that you may be "unaware" or something, when there are so many casual things working against that. I think i function better off a 6 pack of beer then on one coffee and i'm just waiting for the buzz to end (if its a strong buzz). I gradually learned that i was becomming increasingly aware of the effects of what I put in my body, even a can of cola.

If they said a brain numbing microchip was good for my health, i still wouldn't take it. Besides I have great health, because i have no stress and take care of myself. I don't need mind numbing preventative measures!

Just my opinion, I get tempted to grab the coffee out of people's hands and throw it to the ground and shake em and yell "don't fall for it dammit, you don't need it!"

hahaa, peace.

[edit on 30-3-2010 by CavemanDD]



posted on Mar, 30 2010 @ 02:12 PM
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Originally posted by CavemanDD
That's interesting but i'd like to know if it applies to de-caffinated coffee.


G'day CavemanDD

Please see my post (above) regarding decaf coffee.

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not



posted on Mar, 30 2010 @ 02:31 PM
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reply to post by Maybe...maybe not
 


caught that, thanks.

I find it interesting that they grouped tea in the same study since tea is NOT coffee, which raises the first thought I had when i initially read the first post. "this could apply to any drink derived from a plant and vary in effects". Maybe what's really going on here is saying that nutrition strikes again with its "natural foods are good for you?". It's no surprise if you live in a big city, unless you cook every meal you make, its hard not to eat something in your day without some chemical concoction.

The point: Maybe this is just another small localized picture of "natural foods = more natural (disease/dissorder) free living"?

I'd be interested in the varities of teas they tried this on.



posted on Mar, 30 2010 @ 02:45 PM
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reply to post by CavemanDD
 


G'day CavemanDD

I have looked at a couple of papers regarding the benefits of tea, as published by the same Dr.

When I get time later on today, I will post these.

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not



posted on Mar, 30 2010 @ 02:52 PM
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My papa bear (who is now 50) drinks coffee all day long. I would guess maybe 10-12 cups and not only that, but due to work averages 5 hours of sleep a night for the past 7 years and is healthy as a horse. Shoot, he'll have a cup right before bed.



posted on Mar, 30 2010 @ 02:55 PM
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Originally posted by doped00
My papa bear (who is now 50) drinks coffee all day long. I would guess maybe 10-12 cups and not only that, but due to work averages 5 hours of sleep a night for the past 7 years and is healthy as a horse. Shoot, he'll have a cup right before bed.


G'day

One of my Italian friends scoffs down espresso's after dinner like they're going out of style.....they don't seem to touch him!

Me......I'd be awake all night if I had one!

It's funny how it effects people so differently.

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not



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