The SAC Base UFO Flyovers - Oct/Nov, 1975.

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posted on Jan, 24 2012 @ 04:24 PM
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reply to post by karl 12
 


Karl 12 --- Yes....1975 was a great year for UFO sighting's. I had my own personal UFO sighting back in 1976. But .... due to the current religious Christian fanaticism; in the United States Air Force, we are unlikely to recieve any form of UFO disclosure at this time. I base my reasoning, on public news report's that linked religious scandal's, of report's of hazing incident's, at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado against officer's of non-Christian Evangelical faith's.

Back in the 70's..... I did strike up a conversation with a member of the U.S. Air Force at a bar in Maryland. He was a radar operator near a Nike weapon ABM site. The two.... spotted a bogey on their radar scope inside the building. The bogey seemed to stop directly above above their radar site. Both.... went outside the building, and proceded to watch a lighted UFO at nightime; exactly where the radar scope said it should be. I forgot what he told me after that; about what happened to the UFO.



Cheers,


Erno86
edit on 24-1-2012 by Erno86 because: typo




posted on Feb, 3 2012 @ 04:45 AM
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reply to post by Erno86
 



Erno thanks for the reply and 1975 certainly was a very busy year for UFO reports -appreciate you sharing the ABM site account and it's certainly not the first time that military radar scopes have plotted UFOs in the same area of sky where military witnesses have observed them (link).

Found this pretty comprehensive article from the Montreal Gazette about the work of Barry Greenwood and Lawrence Fawcett (authors of 'Clear Intent') and it mentions some pretty interesting reports including a seven page Air Force document about UFO activity over Kirtland Air Force base:



“U.S. covers up UFO landing at NATO base, says book”

Article


Cheers.



posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 09:18 AM
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Great book excerpt from ´Clear Intent´which goes into quite remarkable detail about the SAC base flyovers in October and November 1975:



To summarize briefly, radar picked up the craft over the weapons storage area and followed it to the southeast, where the task of identification was handed over to the KC-135 commander. The KC-135 crew picked it up visually and on radar. Taylor, in his statement to Cahill, never once called the craft a helicopter, but called it "a UFO" and an "object." He said that their speed was about 200 knots, and in each attempt to close with the object, "it would speed away from us." Taylor added that when they were heading back to Wurtsmith, "we turned back in the direction of the UFO, and it really took off... doing approximately 1,000 knots."

One thousand knots! Certainly no helicopter ever built could do such a thing.[Quote]

"Wurtsmith and Others" - 1975



posted on Aug, 6 2013 @ 04:31 PM
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News article about the sightings describing one object as being ‘a 100-foot-diameter sphere which appeared to have craters around the outside’:



Engineer Charges Cover-Up On UFOs”

18 January 1979

Google News Archive

link



posted on Nov, 8 2013 @ 08:05 AM
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karl 12
Information on the Loring AFB incident, October 27, 1975.


1975-Loring Air Force Base UFO Sightings

One of the best documented cases of UFOs at a military installation is the Loring Air Force Base UFO sightings in 1975. The case began at 7:45 P.M. on October 27, 1975. Staff Sergeant Danny K. Lewis, who was assigned to hidden weapons, was on duty when he noticed an unidentified flying object about 300 feet above the ground. The craft, with a red navigation light, was coming from the north. Lewis was shocked when the unknown craft entered Loring's official airspace.

As Lewis was watching the UFO, Staff Sergeant James P. Sampley of the 2192nd Communications Squadron was handling the duties at the base control tower. He got a radar return from the UFO, and calculated it at 10 or more miles east-northeast of the base. Sampley's orders in case of a UFO were to hail the craft through all military and civilian radio bands, which he did. There would be no response from the unknown object. He continued to monitor the return on his screen as the UFO began to circle the base. Ultimately, it moved to within 300 yards of the nuclear storage area, which of course, was highly restricted..

The UFO would continue to fly around the Loring field for forty more minutes, before if left its course, and took off in the direction of Grand Falls, New Brunswick. At about 12 miles distance from Loring, it left the radar screens.



UFO comes back second night:

Inconceivably, the very next night at the same exact time, the UFO was back. Lewis was again manning the radar screen, along with Sergeants Blakeslee and Long. The UFO was coming from north of the base, at 3,000 feet. It came to within 3 miles of Loring, sporting orange, red, and white flashing lights. Lewis, Blakeslee, and Long all saw the UFO, and Lewis again reported the object to Loring command.

The Wing Commander went to the nuclear storage area to see the object for himself. He corroborated the sighting of the three officers in the radar room. Tonight though, there would be not one, but two UFOs. A second unknown object was observed by Sergeant Steven Eickner, and others. The group reported an object which was cigar-shaped with lights of orange and red. This second UFO was seen to simply hover in mid-air. Its lights would blink out, and then the object would reappear over the base runway, about 150 feet altitude.


Link


Following on from the above post Alfred Rosberg over on RealTVUFOs has gathered some great research on the Loring AFB incident including this really interesting interview with a former U.S. Air Force KC-135 Stratotanker pilot who discusses a UFO incident on his return flight to the base:





Links and News articles



There's also some relevant info here from Kevin Randle and others about the explanation offered by debunker Philip Klass.





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