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Wi-Fi anxiety: Man sues neighbor to shut off electronics

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posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 03:16 AM
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reply to post by Magzoid
 



wanna bet $10k that I can prove this phenomena is real?


If you can get someone to get 100/100 correct to say whether a WI-FI router is switched ON or OFF, then you'd have plenty of offers.




posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 03:22 AM
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reply to post by john124
 


would you, Jon124, you like to bet me a nominal amount? name your price and I'll be there.

I'm putting money where ones mouth is because money talks and BS walks.



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 03:54 AM
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reply to post by john124
 





If you can get someone to get 100/100 correct to say whether a WI-FI router is switched ON or OFF, then you'd have plenty of offers.


yes I do.
If I'm near a WIFI antenna, I have instant headache.
I test it by switch on and off the router.

But you need a brain.

WIFI must be stop.


[edit on 29-3-2010 by mixmix]



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 04:19 AM
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Originally posted by saturnine_sweet


I came across this article, and thought it might be a good point of discussion here. The article seems to brush off the idea that there might be some real sickness, for the most part, but I would have to disagree.

I am...very fond of my electronic gadgets and computer and all that, to say the least. But even so, I have had some personal experiences with sensitivity issues to electronic devices. Not wi-fi so much, though it can be an issue if Im right on top of the router, but bluetooth in particular. My phone has bluetooth, and so does my computer, and how I would love to sync via bluetooth...but if I have it turned on, I get immediate headaches, and if I leave it on, it will continue on into nausea, dizziness, etc. This effect fades outside of 20-30 feet, and is tolerable at over ten feet, but if Im holding my phone and turn on bluetooth, I'll be near to vomiting inside of ten minutes, and will experience a headache immediately.

That being said, I would have to think that I am far from the only person to experience such effects, and, were someone more sensitive to them than I, I could see this man's complaint being quite valid. The question is, what's the solution? Most neighborhoods are flooded with wi-fi signals. A lot of public places with crowds quickly have a strong cluster of bluetooth going on, as well. Do we look to change the technology? Do we treat it like an allergy? Do we just ignore it and leave those who are sensitive to find their own quiet space?

From a conspiracy angle, I would have to think that the manufacturers would have to have some idea that this sort of thing can happen in some cases, from their own testing. Gives a whole new use to tin-foil hats!


www.latimes.com
(visit the link for the full news article)


Congratulations!
You have discovered an crowd control non lethal weapon that only works against you!


I am happy these green environmentalist shills had never managed to ban wi-fi technology, actually they might never saw it coming and this technology really picked up, since it can be proved very efficient for people to make ad hock networks and keep some form of Internet functionality in case something happens and the PTB shuts the entire Internet down and maybe the whole civilization.

[edit on 29-3-2010 by spacebot]

Part of their current anti terrorist frenzy is that they never saw many things coming, technology related mostly.

[edit on 29-3-2010 by spacebot]



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 05:58 AM
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Ok.. I have just come back from the Quacks and he is going to find me a paper that was published in Scandinavia, of all Places.

This discusses the effects of Elctromagnetic Radiation and tells of thetest's they did with people who consider themselves to be Hypersensitive to Electronic Devices.

Apparently it was a fairly exhaustive test. He couldn't tell me the Outcomes or give me many details about it but he did say he will try and find it for me.

When I get it, I will post it here for you all to see.


Haha!! Majic Posted>>


You guys are going to kill me, but...


Originally posted by saturnine_sweet
Im beginning to think that some people here are willfully blind...or just causing trouble.



Originally posted by Damian-007
In fact, It just so happens that I'll be seeing a respected Surgeon after I see the Eye Doctor.


Now please excuse me while I go warn myself


Very Inventive not to mention Funny.. you're on the ball, Majic.

[edit on 29-3-2010 by Damian-007]



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 06:16 AM
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reply to post by Damian-007
 


G'day Damian 007

Are you sure your Dr isn't refering to the paper I linked to in my 1st post?

I think that's it.

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 06:20 AM
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reply to post by Damian-007
 


G'day Damian 007

Actually, I changed my mind.

Try this info from a recent thread of mine:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Here are 2 more recent studies for your consideration:

Study 1:




From The International Journal of Epidemiology:

Meningioma and Mobile Phone use - A Collaborative Case-Control Study in Five North European Countries

Conclusions:

Our results do not provide support for an association between mobile phone use and risk of meningioma.

www.medscape.com...



Study 2:




From The Journal of Clinical Oncology:

Conclusions:

The meta-analysis found that, overall, the use of cell phones was not significantly associated with the risk for tumors in a random-effects model meta-analysis. Compared with people who never or rarely used a cell phone, the odds ratio (OR) for the overall use of cell phones was 0.98 for malignant and benign tumors (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.89 - 1.07).

www.medscape.com...



Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not

[edit on 29-3-2010 by Maybe...maybe not]



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 06:23 AM
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reply to post by Maybe...maybe not
 


Hi Maybe...Maybe not

Thankyou very much for that Info. I'm going to print it out and give it to the Doc and see what he thinks.

He might find it as interesting as I do.



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 06:26 AM
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reply to post by Damian-007
 


G'day Damien 007

You also have the info I linked to in my 1st post regarding "electrosensitivity" (which IMHO is not real).

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 08:25 AM
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Aren't Wi-fi networks and the like pretty much everywhere nowadays?



McDonalds, Starbucks, malls, airports, schools etc.

If this person is really suffering from the symptoms he describes and caused by these frequencies as he claims, than he wouldn't be able to go pretty much anywhere.

I think I'm still on the fence whether or not this a real phenomena, or, if it is all in his mind, as another poster here pointed out.



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 08:33 AM
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Just drive down your own street and see how many wi-fi networks there are. I have 4 I could tap into from my house if I had the password. Better yet drive by a medical office complex with your I-Touch on searching for hot spots. It's everywhere and some communites are looking into providiing wi-fi free city or county- wide. What will people do then, just avoid that city or county?



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 08:38 AM
link   

Originally posted by mixmix

yes I do.
If I'm near a WIFI antenna, I have instant headache.
I test it by switch on and off the router.

But you need a brain.

WIFI must be stop.



That's not a true test, you should have someone else be turning it on or off and you telling them what they did. You need to do a truly blind test and then maybe get a university to document it. Your testing of it is flawed the way you describe.

[edit on 29-3-2010 by pavil]



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 11:33 AM
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I'm late to the party here, and I'll preface by saying I'm on the fence with regard to whether or not electrosensitivity is a physical or a psychological condition. But I want to point out one phrase from a study cited in the thread:


Originally posted by ALLis0NE
You don't get it do you?

There has already been tests done on people just like you. They thought they could detect weak radio signals. It turns out they all failed to do better than someone who was guessing.



Science Direct


This review showed that the large majority of individuals who claims to be able to detect low level RF-EMF are not able to do so under double-blind conditions. (emphasis added)


If a "large majority" of those self-diagnosed with this sensitivity could not prove it under double-blind conditions, that implies that a small minority could. I.e., the phenomenon could be real, but overly self-diagnosed.

edit to fix quote tags

[edit on 3/29/2010 by americandingbat]



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 11:47 AM
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reply to post by franspeakfree
 


Yeah, I said rarely, I remember a teacher complaining about a headache or something, but I think she just came back of stress leave so I think that was the reason behind it.
Other cases are teachers didn't want to accept the technology and would make petty excuses to remove them from their classrooms.



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 11:51 AM
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reply to post by saturnine_sweet
 


If the guy really is that sensitive to RF and electronics then he has no business living in the heart of a city. This is yet another case of a minority wanting to change the rules for everyone just to cater to them.



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 12:53 PM
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This sounds like a crock to me. Its just someone's over imagination. If someone really has serious health problems caused by EM radiation then, my friend, good luck living a normal life. Even the Earth herself emits EM radiation. You are constantly walking around in a never ending EM field created by microwaves, televisions, radios, cars, landline phones, power lines, the sun, all the stars and planets in space, short wave radios, lamps, light bulbs, calculators, batteries, and everything that uses any kind of electronoic power. So really, yea right. This guy probably turned on his computer and saw that his neighbor had wi-fi and THEN he started feeling sick. If this stuff really had an adverse effect on human health we would all be feeling it. For god's sakes, its the old, "TVs are going to give you eye cancer," crap all over again. Unless this guy doesn't use any electricity I say he's full of it.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 12:57 PM
link   
Reply to post by americandingbat
 


I would like to point out to you that "large majority" may mean simply that 90% of the people tested may have not been able to tell and 10% are inconclusive (lucky guesses, etc.). Statistically speaking, that is everyone.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 01:21 PM
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Not justifiable. If he's got a problem with RF, he should insulate his house against it with a Faraday cage. Just because he thinks he has a right to shut things down, doesn't mean he actually does.



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 01:41 PM
link   

Originally posted by saturnine_sweet


I came across this article, and thought it might be a good point of discussion here. The article seems to brush off the idea that there might be some real sickness, for the most part, but I would have to disagree.

I am...very fond of my electronic gadgets and computer and all that, to say the least. But even so, I have had some personal experiences with sensitivity issues to electronic devices. Not wi-fi so much, though it can be an issue if Im right on top of the router, but bluetooth in particular. My phone has bluetooth, and so does my computer, and how I would love to sync via bluetooth...but if I have it turned on, I get immediate headaches, and if I leave it on, it will continue on into nausea, dizziness, etc. This effect fades outside of 20-30 feet, and is tolerable at over ten feet, but if Im holding my phone and turn on bluetooth, I'll be near to vomiting inside of ten minutes, and will experience a headache immediately.

That being said, I would have to think that I am far from the only person to experience such effects, and, were someone more sensitive to them than I, I could see this man's complaint being quite valid. The question is, what's the solution? Most neighborhoods are flooded with wi-fi signals. A lot of public places with crowds quickly have a strong cluster of bluetooth going on, as well. Do we look to change the technology? Do we treat it like an allergy? Do we just ignore it and leave those who are sensitive to find their own quiet space?

From a conspiracy angle, I would have to think that the manufacturers would have to have some idea that this sort of thing can happen in some cases, from their own testing. Gives a whole new use to tin-foil hats!


www.latimes.com
(visit the link for the full news article)


Where I have highlighted the above quote, you also have to take into consideration who it is that owns the corporate business investing in the manufacturer's business for WI-FI electronics as I can imagine that the manufacturer's are paid well to have a lid kept on the subject with regard's to the danger's of wireless technology.

People should also note that everyone of us have an electric magnetic field which can be interpreted in many ways in the english language. That being said one should understand that the use of wireless technology forms negative vibes which more than anything would be the reason the corporate agency would use this in conjunction with the product and the consumer to weaken the individual using it and via by control the subject.

With enough exposure to electronics can cause harmful effects especially when each one of us should only be exposed upto a maximum of 300 rad per day. Any more will result to terminal cancer defects and will serve consequental fatalities. Just think years and years of exposure to wireless technology alongside with the junk the media throw at people on a daily basis and the consistent headaches/migraines will be a perfect scenario setup for world government agencies for a mind control program.

Keep an eye-out is my advice and enjoy life



posted on Mar, 29 2010 @ 02:53 PM
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Originally posted by americandingbat
If a "large majority" of those self-diagnosed with this sensitivity could not prove it under double-blind conditions, that implies that a small minority could. I.e., the phenomenon could be real, but overly self-diagnosed.


Well, to support what you were saying the article does says this:



This review showed that the large majority of individuals who claims to be able to detect low level RF-EMF are not able to do so under double-blind conditions. If such individuals exist, they represent a small minority and have not been identified yet.


They are simply leaving it open for further study by saying there still could be individuals out there with this condition, but they have not been identified yet.



RF-EMF discrimination was investigated in seven studies including a total of 182 self-declared electromagnetic hypersensitive (EHS) individuals and 332 non-EHS individuals.


..out of 182 self-declared EHS sufferers NONE of them were able to do what they claimed. I don't see why 1 or 2 more people would be any different, but in a world of unlimited possibilities, sure it could be possible, but we still haven't ever seen it to be possible.

There is no real mechanism in the human body to detect such signals. If weak signals are effecting you, there is something else going on.

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