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New Mexico teen sheds light on Indian suicides before Senate panel

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posted on Mar, 26 2010 @ 02:35 PM
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New Mexico teen sheds light on Indian suicides before Senate panel


www.santafenewmexican.com

Coloradas went to Capitol Hill on Thursday to tell lawmakers about the urgent problem of suicide among Native Americans. Tribal suicide rates are 70 percent higher than for the general population, and the youth suicide rate is even higher. On some reservations youth suicide rates are 10 times the national average.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Mar, 26 2010 @ 02:35 PM
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Now this is a brave young man a 15, high school sophomore Coloradas Mangas has lost several of his friends this year
Coloradas, wearing a traditional Apache shirt and a red bandanna over his long black hair, said he was nervous about testifying, but was spurred on by his grandmother, a community leader who named him after one of his ancestors, Mangas Coloradas, a well-known Apache chief.


"I am from a new generation of young men and women who believe in breaking the silence and seeking help," Coloradas testified. "I come from a people whose pride runs deeps, but I also understand that sometimes pride can keep us from asking for help."


www.santafenewmexican.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Mar, 26 2010 @ 03:40 PM
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I don't understand why they are commiting suicide.

are they treated very badly as they get older?



posted on Mar, 26 2010 @ 05:35 PM
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Originally posted by MR BOB
I don't understand why they are committing suicide.

are they treated very badly as they get older?


Why does anyone feel like the only answer is to take your own life?
feelings of being trapped no future feelings of neglect???

depression if a lot more common than people realize but when you get into one of these cycles were many people you know are doing it, it seems all the easier to do it yourself.

the worse thing any of can do is deny it's happening, our best weapon against it, is to openly talk, look for those signs and be there with offers of help and understanding. no problem is to insurmountable that we cant work it out together... the key to stopping suicide is awareness and this kid is making his own long walk to do just that!
Brovo Mister Coloradas Mangas...


[edit on 26-3-2010 by DaddyBare]



posted on Mar, 26 2010 @ 06:09 PM
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Originally posted by MR BOB
I don't understand why they are commiting suicide.

are they treated very badly as they get older?


I have a lot of Indian blood. Some Navajo, some from Mexico. If you were to see me physically, you would definitely get the impression, Native American. I don't have much, but I own my own house free and clear, a few junk cars. etc.

My suspicion is that in a suicide epidemic of this kind there could be prescription drug problems. Like those psychotropic drugs that they give you and you go nuts.

Personally I like having Indian blood.



posted on Mar, 26 2010 @ 07:29 PM
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I find that article disturbing.



Kids don't take your own life. Remember whatever you're going through remember...


This too shall pass.



posted on Mar, 26 2010 @ 08:07 PM
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Sad part is that it takes an appearance in front of a Congressional panel in order for a Senator to call it a crisis and demand urgent attention. :shk:

The government has the stats and should have started addressing this issue from the word go.

Here is something from 2000


A 2000 report by the Indian Health Service, an agency within the Department of Health and Human Services, showed that among American Indian youth, 33.9 per 100,000 commit suicide each year, which is 2.5 times the national rate for all youth.


pn.psychiatryonline.org...



posted on Mar, 27 2010 @ 06:49 AM
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reply to post by chorizo4
 


sorry to sound ignorant but I know little about native americans, or how they live today.

So are the majority usually much poorer than say, someone living in the suburbs?

and what is this drug prescribed? why is it prescirbed? is it prescibed only to Native americans?



posted on Mar, 27 2010 @ 07:52 AM
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Originally posted by MR BOB
reply to post by chorizo 4
 


sorry to sound ignorant but I know little about native americans, or how they live today.

So are the majority usually much poorer than say, someone living in the suburbs?

and what is this drug prescribed? why is it prescribed? is it prescribed only to Native americans?



Well not all but a good many Native Americans live on reservations... Some of those can be truly horrific places. abject poverty, no electric or running water...
there are places like out on Navajo land where white people are merely a myth a story told to bad children to make them behave...

Here in the southwest there is an element of mistrust between the government and we red skins... there was a time not so very long ago when children were taken from their families and forced to attend government boarding schools..Corporal punishment the norm if these kids were caught speaking their native tongues...



David Wallace Adams’ book tells of the boarding school experience from the 1875 to 1928, and Brenda Childs from the 1930’s to the 1940’s. Without any lap-over, they both portray the experiences of students trying to cope with a situation not of their making. Whereas Education for Extinction shows how first federal troops and later, native police roughly removed children from their parents, Brenda Childs shows the reader of a more orderly round up. However, look at the dates between the two books, Brenda Childs is writing about a period where the parents probably had memories of their own education. The parents likely were the people that David Wallace Adams wrote in his book. Thirty years has past since the first children were forced from their homes, most of the children knew that when they attained a certain age, they could expect to go to boarding schools; also education in the boarding schools changed in the forties. The discipline found in the earlier days of schooling lessened in the latter years, especially in the 1940’s. The schools themselves changed, there was an actual curriculum was still substandard however, with the country in the grips of a worldwide depression, the children did receive food and clothing and a roof over their heads.


Then there are charges that during the 1970's young ladies were sterilized (Unable to have babies) without their consent at various BIA health clinics
See Here

All these things have set up a good deal of mistrust when it comes to anything to do with the BIA or the federal government.

It's fair to say people of my generation do not willingly go to clinics unless we're bleeding buckets and drug there on our death beds. So what happens when someone feels depressed and has no one to turn too?

That needs to change and it's up to this generation to make those changes... One of those changes is we Native Americans simply have a different metabolizam than that of caucasians... drugs effect us differently... look at alcohol, to white people its just a party drink, to my people it's a poison...I only pray this time an offered hand of friendship will not be met with an iron fist




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