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UK Government Aims for Paperless Society within Four Years

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posted on Mar, 27 2010 @ 01:13 AM
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why build the Internet in the first place then censor it? why not censor it in the beginning.
Paperless society? good idea but than you think, how are you going to prove your identity if you don't have a passport or birth certificate??.

That surly has to be some kind of chip then i suppose?




posted on Mar, 27 2010 @ 01:30 AM
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reply to post by anonymousproxy
 


Who said anything sbout Net censorship?

And the term "paperless society" is more of a project title than anything else. Of course there will still be things like Passports and Birth certificates, because at the very least, other countries will not be paperless but no matter how "advanced" you are, some things just can't be digital..

Yet again, ATS seems to be reaching for some perculiar state of affairs where none exists...



posted on Mar, 27 2010 @ 01:32 AM
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Pray Dear Old England is never attacked by EM Weapons then , or All your lives will go poof ..........



posted on Mar, 27 2010 @ 04:44 AM
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Originally posted by Zanti Misfit
Pray Dear Old England is never attacked by EM Weapons then , or All your lives will go poof ..........


I was thinking exactly the same, we will have nothing left.

It really worries me that everything is going online. As good as the internet is, what happens if it dies, gets overloaded, taken out by EM or something similar?

My kids get given homework and the ONLY way they can do it is by going online. Therefore parents nowadays NEED to have a recent PC, inkjet printer and broadband at home so the kids can get through school.

What a joke, I didn't even have computers at school, never mind at home and I got straight A's in all my exams by learning from a BOOK, remember them!

A top IT guy said to me last week, computer files from 15 years ago can't be read anymore by our high tech PC's! Who nowadays knows how to use DOS commands or write a program in BASIC?

Although all my music is on my iPhone in MP3 format, I still have everything on CD, Tape and Vinyl as a BACKUP!

Books will be around in another 500 years, DONT RELY IN DIGITAL EVERYTHING, stupid labour Government!



posted on Mar, 27 2010 @ 06:12 AM
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Originally posted by BetweenMyths

The Semantic Web & Internet of Things
kencraggs.livejournal.com...
I suggest you at least read 'The World Government Global Database' and 'An Orwellian World for Big Brother'.

This is how the NWO are getting people into key posts in the public sector. I suggest you take the time to read the entire article.
onlinejournal.com...


Big star for you BetweenMyths. Thank you.


...Posters here have said there is no Internet, the Internet cannot be controlled, ATS members perceive some world that doesn't exist... Please, read some of the reports BetweenMyths linked.

From An Orwellian world for Big Brother:



The Council of Europe document ‘Internet Governance and critical Internet resources’ states (p.7) that “ . . . the Internet of Things refers to the seamless connection of devices, sensors, objects, rooms, machines, vehicles, etc, through fixed and wireless networks. Connected sensors, devices and tags can interact with the environment and send the information to other objects through machine-to-machine communication . . . The Semantic Web promotes this synergy: even agents that where not expressly designed to work together can transfer data among themselves when the data come with semantics.”

Pachube (pronounced Patch-bay) is a platform that helps individuals and organisations connect to and build the ‘internet of things’ and enable buildings, interactive environments, networked energy meters, virtual worlds and sensor devices to “talk” and “respond” to each other. Pachube, according to the founder, Usman Haque, is a vision inspired by Dutch architect Constant Nieuwenhuys and his 1956 proposal for a visionary society, New Babylon.

Around the world, a near invisible network of RFID wireless tags is being put on almost every type of consumer item. Wireless tags and sensors are being produced in their billions and are capable of being connected to the Internet in an instant. Yet this network is being built with little public knowledge or consent.

IT company Hewlett Packard intends to create a Central Nervous System for the Earth (CeNSE), consisting of a trillion nanoscale sensors and actuators embedded in the environment and connected via an array of networks with computing systems, software and services to exchange their information among analysis engines, storage systems and end users. Ericsson, the Mobile telecommunications company, predicts that 50 billion devices will be wirelessly connected in 2020 and Cisco envisages the next generation of the Internet as having 1,000 times as many devices as the current Internet.



posted on Mar, 27 2010 @ 06:58 AM
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I work for a book distribution company & we've just started using handheld scanners to scan books rather than using paper,it's alot of info to take in but it works.
the main problem is when the system goes down thats it,you have to wait for it to get fixed,no paper means you can't continue.

it's a good idea to go digital but 4 years is not alot of time to implement it,more like 7 or 8 but goverments change.
i do feel whoever wins the next election will continue the digital path,maybe a different angle but the same result at the end



posted on Mar, 27 2010 @ 07:32 AM
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Originally posted by infinite
If you notice, banks do not provide written statements anymore-mine are all online. My mobile contract bill has also transferred to the electronic arena.


That's not quite true. Whilst it might be the case for some banks, I get a printed statement from the HSBC.

As for the thrust of the thread, I'm half and half. I loathe the idea of a centralised database on principle due to security reasons but also due to 'function creep' and who gets access to data. There's some truth that everything starts off as one thing but generally ends-up as another. Yet, from a completely neutral point of view, I can see how it sounds like a good idea. Unfortunately, there's very little genuine neutrality involved in many of these schemes as, if they can be exploited in some way they will be. Not just in a security sense but in a 'hey, I've an idea how to not only make this database pay for itself, but maybe make money from it' sense.

On a practical side, I work in a large socialistismistic organisation and whilst computer-based systems make my life easier and just more practical, when the network goes down for whatever reason - and it does - without access to paper-based back-ups, it's not only frustrating but also very dangerous.



posted on Mar, 27 2010 @ 02:28 PM
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Originally posted by minkey53

Originally posted by Zanti Misfit
Pray Dear Old England is never attacked by EM Weapons then , or All your lives will go poof ..........


I was thinking exactly the same, we will have nothing left.


Most large datacentres and certainly any with critical information are housed in former bunkers or other large shielded area's, plus they are backed up remotely.

For an EMP powerful enough, you would need huge nuclear weapons to knock out ALL the data storage that would be needed for this project and the country itself would be wiped out, so there really isn't a problem there! Who cares if you can't access your birth certificate if you're irradiated dust?


Originally posted by minkey53
It really worries me that everything is going online. As good as the internet is, what happens if it dies, gets overloaded, taken out by EM or something similar?


I've said it many times, but there is no such thing as the "internet". People seem to have this impression that out there in the world, there is this vast, homogenous network known as the internet which lords over all communications.

In truth, it's just a protocol. The actual networks are many and owned by hundreds of different companies and entities. As such, it can never become "overloaded" or taken out. Parts of the physical network can certainly break, it's actually my job to fix that, but the "internet" will always exist as long as there are two computers and some copper wire left in the world.


Originally posted by minkey53
My kids get given homework and the ONLY way they can do it is by going online. Therefore parents nowadays NEED to have a recent PC, inkjet printer and broadband at home so the kids can get through school.

What a joke, I didn't even have computers at school, never mind at home and I got straight A's in all my exams by learning from a BOOK, remember them!


Times change. Back in the days when you had to trawl through books, learning was slow. The speed at which my kids can now access and absorb information is staggering. They are clearly better at many things than I was at there age and they can do things which I couldn't have even imagined possible when I was young!


Originally posted by minkey53
A top IT guy said to me last week, computer files from 15 years ago can't be read anymore by our high tech PC's! Who nowadays knows how to use DOS commands or write a program in BASIC?


He can't have been that "top".

I can use programmes from 1990 on my quad core mega-machine at home. Software exists to make new machines backwards compatable and any nerd worth his salt can use DOS commands. And any one doing a computing degree at University will cover BASIC in their first term.



Originally posted by minkey53
Books will be around in another 500 years, DONT RELY IN DIGITAL EVERYTHING, stupid labour Government!


Books can be destroyed easier than digital information, which can be backed up remotely in multiple locations.



posted on Mar, 27 2010 @ 02:54 PM
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reply to post by stumason
 



stumason - please, would you comment on the information contained in BetweenMyths post?


Originally posted by BetweenMyths

The Semantic Web & Internet of Things
kencraggs.livejournal.com...
I suggest you at least read 'The World Government Global Database' and 'An Orwellian World for Big Brother'.

This is how the NWO are getting people into key posts in the public sector. I suggest you take the time to read the entire article.
onlinejournal.com...



posted on Mar, 27 2010 @ 03:12 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


No, because that post had nothing to do with this thread at all.

Sorry!



posted on Mar, 27 2010 @ 03:13 PM
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Reminds me of the new methods the newspapers are using of ridding their daily physical paper prints, and going online. to which you and I will now have to pay for the privilidge of reading.

Even freedom of information will now be compromised if Brown gets voted in (again) and has his way with these plans.



posted on Mar, 27 2010 @ 03:18 PM
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reply to post by ROBL240
 


Now, I'm not the biggest fan of Turd Brown, but a digital portal into Government would actually open up information and ease of access to services. It would also drive down costs needed to provide those services.

Any fears of a "global database" are about 20 years too late. All our information has been on Government computers for years.

They're just opening up this info to us plebs now and making all our information accesible to US.

THEY have had it for years already.

[edit on 27/3/10 by stumason]



posted on Mar, 27 2010 @ 03:54 PM
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Originally posted by stumason
reply to post by soficrow
 


No, because that post had nothing to do with this thread at all.

Sorry!



I think it has EVERYTHING to do with this thread - and certainly helps explain the rush to barricade Intellectual Property Rights and secure dominance for mega- corporations.

(someone at door - wrote fast. BBL)



posted on Mar, 27 2010 @ 03:56 PM
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reply to post by minkey53
 


For very Important Documents , there should be Paper backups . I am sure the British Goverment has them in place , so why not the general public ?



posted on Mar, 27 2010 @ 05:39 PM
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I work in IT for local government here in the Uk and am involved in a number of projects to reduce the amount of paper that we handle. There are good reasons to do this. Here are just a few...

- Reduce storage costs by decreasing the amount of office space required (we have recently disposed of 2 buildings)
- Speed up answering enquiries by electronicaly indexing the information for faster searches.
- Decrease transaction costs by dealing with enquiries and payment online.
- Secure the information better so that only the people who have permissions can access it.
- Lower the chance of data loss (or at least speed up recovery).

All these things (there are more but its late and I can't be bothered to write a business case) are being done to improve efficiency and reduce costs. This gives a better service to the Citizen, keeps OUR Council tax down (yes, I'm a citizen too) and gives better value for money.

As an example: enquiries/payments by post cost about £12 to handle, telephone about £3 and online about 48p (I'm not at work at the moment so can't confirm exact figures but they are pretty close). We handle around 1,000 enquiries a day of one sort or another. I'm sure you can do the math.

From a local government perspective there is no conspiracy. It's all about doing more for less. Central government on the other hand... I have no idea.

cheers



posted on Mar, 27 2010 @ 05:51 PM
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So reduce the space by having record online. Great, but when people make enquiries over the phone the Government will still need call-centres and manned staff/stations to deal with those enquiries so the space hasn't really been reduced. Just the manual cost it takes to oversee the records being stored, call-staff are cheap and easy.

The Government doesn't have to pay a thing towards it either as WE (the public) will be paying for these calls, in order to get information which should be FREELY avaliable to us. again another good tactic to rid yet more cash out of the pockets of the poor.



posted on Mar, 27 2010 @ 06:04 PM
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reply to post by ROBL240
 


Why do you need to call anyone if you have a web portal?

I've online banked for over a decade and in that time I have made about 1 call a year to the bank to an 0845 number, which is local rate, the rest of the time they call me after I send a request through the secure message system.

People always make a fuss over having to call an 08 number, but I never understand why.

0800 are free, 0845 are local rate an 0870 a max 10p a minute. But people seem to class them as premium rate numbers, which they aren't at all.



posted on Mar, 27 2010 @ 06:18 PM
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Because as mentioned before. Were paying taxes for a perfectly good system at the moment, and this excuse of "there's no space" is bull. No I don't know about you but there's plenty of office's around the major cities that have EVERY lights on 24/7 year round that are empty and can be used for data storage.
It would be a fraction of the cost to rent a building out, as it would be maintain ONE Eurofighter (which will never see frontline action.) And you wonder where Browns priorities are? Because its sure not with helping the British people, or easing our taxes in this recession.
Again capitalism, making the rich richer while the poor get poorer.



posted on Mar, 27 2010 @ 06:26 PM
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reply to post by ROBL240
 



Perfectly good system? You lost me there, bud. It's anything but!

You must be aware of the amount of money spend on admin in State functions, so any effort to trim that is paramount.

Also, are you aware of the cost of renting even a medium sized office building? The company I worked for just shut down a building here in our campus that was costing £4 million a year! It only had a 1000 person capacity.

The amount of office space needed for storage would be vast and so would the cost (it is already).

Quite why you're getting your knickers in a twist over Government attempts to trim cost and make services more accessable is beyond me, especially when bitching about taxes and getting poorer!!

And I do not see the relevance of an inaccurate rant about a Eurofighter!



posted on Mar, 27 2010 @ 06:31 PM
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One of my British friends is unemployed.

He has to go to a government office every other week to tell them that he's still unemployed, in order to get his social security payment. There he has to wait in a line for a while, along with drug users and alcoholics, then he's quizzed about his efforts to find work. He finds the whole process hugely demeaning.

Now if all he had to do was to record his unemployment online every two weeks, he'd have more time to look for work ? He might feel better about himself too. And the government could close that office (and hundreds of others), pay off all the staff and transfer the work to remote processing centers. They'd save a fortune.

Sounds good for him, good for the taxpayer, good for the English government



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