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UK Government Aims for Paperless Society within Four Years

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posted on Mar, 25 2010 @ 08:20 AM
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UK Government Aims for Paperless Society within Four Years


www.proprint.com.au

UK prime minister Gordon Brown has announced plans to create a paperless society by delivering job centre, passport, driving licence and benefit administration online within next four years.

Outlining his vision of a 'Digital Britain' in a speech earlier this week, Brown revealed plans for MyGov – a personalised web portal for each UK citizen that would give them access to a raft of government services online.

(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Mar, 25 2010 @ 08:20 AM
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A personalized web portal for every citizen. All your documents online, nothing to carry around. Wow.

I wonder how long it will take for the chips to "become available." If you don't have a paper passport, what do you do?

...But at least he didn't say "consumer" instead of citizen.

The plan is designed to save money - a laudable objective. However, the British Printing Industries Federation (BPIF) fears that "a paperless state could also turn out to be a "faceless one" if the government's plans go ahead." The least of Brits' worries here, methinks.

This move looks like one to watch...






www.proprint.com.au
(visit the link for the full news article)

[edit on 25-3-2010 by soficrow]



posted on Mar, 25 2010 @ 08:34 AM
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This bloody government!!!!


Can't they just leave us alone to live our lives?

They haven't even thought this one through at all. Are they seriously proposeing that my 76 year old dad is going to understand how to recieve everything through email? The man can't even bring up the lottery results through digital teletext or use a search engine!!

I'm pretty sure most old folks are gonna be in the same boat.

And that's just the first problem that came to mind.



posted on Mar, 25 2010 @ 08:39 AM
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You can only achieve and guarantee security, for this system, if the British government aim to control the internet. And trust me, Lord Mandelson wishes to have full authority over the web.

A paperless society is extremely draconian. We'll only have access to our documents, personal information, at the pleasure of the government. If you notice, banks do not provide written statements anymore-mine are all online. My mobile contract bill has also transferred to the electronic arena.



posted on Mar, 25 2010 @ 09:53 AM
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reply to post by nik1halo
 


So? No offence but people who can't do something as simple as open e-mail or surf the web are in an extrem minority and, in all honesty, won't be around for much longer anyway.

Times must move on.

In any case, the option will always be there for the "traditional" method.

reply to post by infinite
 


Infinite, thats a bit OTT, don't you think?

Aside from the fact that there is no "internet" to control, how do you think people have been doing online banking and other transactions over the web? If it's safe enough for banking, then it's safe enough for Government.

Don't start with the whole identity theft thing either, or "online security". I've been banking online since 2000 and never had an issue. I don't get viruses on my PC and dont get spyware, never had my ID stolen and do all my transactions over the web.

Not once have I been a victim of any kind of fraud, because a bit of common sense prevents it.

Granted, I am "tech savvy", but it doesn't take a genius to be safe online. You wouldn't fill in a random form that came through your door with all your account details and PIN numbers, so why do it online?

There is also a strong argument that online transactions are a damned site safer and more secure than sending it all through the post.

I've been begging and pleading for Government services to go online for at least 5 years. It's about bloody time.

Problem is, Government + IT projects = Cock up.

Not the IT's problem, but rather the Civil Servants are dumb and lack even cursory knowledge of the real world.



posted on Mar, 25 2010 @ 10:08 AM
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It's a good move to make everything paperless. More trees will be saved and wastage will be controlled. It's better late then never. S&F to the govt.



posted on Mar, 25 2010 @ 10:13 AM
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This is happening here in Australia too. There are moves to centralise much information on people in online databases.

Especially information about their health and education.

Also in the UK and in the US (through Obamacare)

All across Western society we're increasingly subjected to rather crazy anti terror laws that don't even seem to have anything to do with terrorists anymore. It's just a constant crackdown on our civil rights.

What ever happened to privacy?

Everything we do is watched and tracked and filed away. Our whole lives and everything we do is tracked and logged.



posted on Mar, 25 2010 @ 10:16 AM
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reply to post by stumason
 


It's not their fault that they're IT illiterate, they come from a different time. I just see this causing a lot of people a lot of trouble if it's implemented across the board, but I guess we'll have to agree to disagree


As for the Gov + IT = Cock-up, I totally agree. They will spend millions of OUR money developing this, taking years to get even a basic version running and then it won't work properly and they'll lose everyone's personal data by leaving it on a disk on the train!

Just look at what happened with the super-duper centralised NHS system



posted on Mar, 25 2010 @ 10:17 AM
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reply to post by stumason
 


Well, the UK government wants to amend European Union legislation to effectively kill Net Neutrality In EU. How do you reckon the government will be able to disconnect users, who participate in illegal download? The internet will have to be monitored and controlled.

John Reid, when at the Home Office, drew up plans for a nation wide firewall to restrict content to any material that the government "didn't like."

Clause 11 of the Digital Economy Bill;



11


Obligations to limit internet access


After section 124G of the Communications Act 2003 insert—


“124H


Obligations to limit internet access


20

(1)


The Secretary of State may at any time by order impose a technical


obligation on internet service providers if the Secretary of State


considers it appropriate in view of—


(a)


an assessment carried out or steps taken by OFCOM under


section 124G; or


25

(b)


any other consideration.


(2)


An order under this section must specify the date from which the


technical obligation is to have effect, or provide for it to be specified.


(3)


The order may also specify—


(a)


the criteria for taking the technical measure concerned against a


30

subscriber;


(b)


the steps to be taken as part of the measure and when they are to be taken.”



posted on Mar, 25 2010 @ 10:19 AM
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Also

Critics have pointed to the fact that the bill also grants Peter Mandelson, First Secretary of State, unlimited power to enforce copyright by bringing into law any measure relating to file-sharing on the Internet, without the consent of Parliament

wiki Digital Economy Bill

Section 17 of the bill:

(a) confer a power or right or impose a duty on any person;

(b) modify or remove a power, right or duty of any person;

(c) require a person to pay fees.



posted on Mar, 25 2010 @ 10:27 AM
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It might be paperless when it's coming to you but you can always print out your own copy.
Which I'm sure most people will do just in case there is a problem that needs verification anyway.
It seems all this has done really is put the cost of the paper and the time to print it out onto the consumers (oops I meant citizens.
)



posted on Mar, 25 2010 @ 10:29 AM
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Originally posted by infinite
You can only achieve and guarantee security, for this system, if the British government aim to control the internet. And trust me, Lord Mandelson wishes to have full authority over the web.

A paperless society is extremely draconian. We'll only have access to our documents, personal information, at the pleasure of the government.


The Semantic Web & Internet of Things
kencraggs.livejournal.com...
I suggest you at least read 'The World Government Global Database' and 'An Orwellian World for Big Brother'.

This is how the NWO are getting people into key posts in the public sector. I suggest you take the time to read the entire article.
onlinejournal.com...



posted on Mar, 25 2010 @ 10:41 AM
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Originally posted by December_Rain
It's a good move to make everything paperless. More trees will be saved and wastage will be controlled. It's better late then never. S&F to the govt.


You don't need trees to make paper, I think HEMP would do just fine for that!

I don't know if I would trust a completely online "storage" of my documents, as somone else pointed out here already - because this could be a sinister vehicle and excuse to implement more control and security on the Internet to achieve this new "secure" paperless society.

No! I say we stay with the paper until we can completely trust our Governments again - and that no baleful agenda is behind this!


But would't be nice to have several hemp producing plots in our communities where we could grow hemp and then sell it to producers to make paper?

It would create a new market and inject the economy of townships with new needed tax money and could solve some of the unemploment problems as well.

There could also be very nice side effects for the society with such community hemp production!


A very 'happy' and relaxed society!



posted on Mar, 25 2010 @ 11:07 AM
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I can only assume this is because of the risk from paper cuts.

Or did someone lose an eye from a paper plane related incident?

Seriously, if the UK does it, work from the basis that it's a bad idea and you'll win more than you lose.



posted on Mar, 25 2010 @ 11:10 AM
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reply to post by Chevalerous
 


OMG, imagine the effect if there was a fire at the paper factory!


You'd see hoards of Uni students running towards the fire



posted on Mar, 25 2010 @ 11:12 AM
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Originally posted by Retseh
I can only assume this is because of the risk from paper cuts.

Or did someone lose an eye from a paper plane related incident?

Seriously, if the UK does it, work from the basis that it's a bad idea and you'll win more than you lose.


I can't argue with that and I live here.

This NewLab Gov really does come up with some seriously boneheaded ideas.



posted on Mar, 25 2010 @ 11:42 AM
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My previous agency was going paperless. I can certainly see why people would be paranoid about having all their documents in one place, but the functions of government are vast, and it can help as well as harm. The usual double edged sword.

Why was the agency going paperless? Because they have to hang onto documents fo 50 years or more. With the increase of population, this is creating quite a storage problem. It saves a lot of money not having to archive or store paper.

Not only that, we can see things that should be cross referenced between agencies. For example, a gas station being placed near homes that have well water.

One of my jobs was to gps the exact locations of home's wells. But this information was being linked to the USGS. So if a tanker truck or train tips over and spills contents, inspectors can immediately look at the properties and rock formations to see if that if the substance was absorbed into the ground, could it be funneled toward homes. It was also used to generate data that was documented if there was problems in water, to see if there was a central cause.

While most on ats believe that governement has nothing but nefarious plots and tendencies, I can assure, they all don't.



posted on Mar, 25 2010 @ 11:49 AM
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reply to post by nik1halo
 


mmmm...me thinks!!

This could be a new business to assist ppl with the online data...:-)
Have tech will travel..



posted on Mar, 25 2010 @ 12:44 PM
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They are also in the process of making an new NHS database, if you do a little research and see what they are doing or attempting to do in the states is pretty much the same but by introducing the RFID chip, to make such a plan easier for the medical profession, In my opinion if you take that database, and digitise the entire country, what better way to get rid of the paper, (birth certificates, passports etc) and replace that with the RFID chip, Britain becomes completely digital and we all get controlled, welcome to the NWO. I hope however that the Labour government will be gone soon, and that we will have a more sensible party, willing to listen to the British public, though i fear that the same puppet master is controlling the lot of them.



posted on Mar, 26 2010 @ 08:05 AM
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I'm thinking all the "allies" are taking turns implementing a piece of the 'strategy' to shut down the Free Web.

Australia did their thing with the "anti-porn" cover; Britain with this one; the US has a few fronts. ...Canada just censors and doesn't talk about it publicly.

We're way past the edge of the wedge here... Any day now they're going to "harmonize" Net laws, and game over.


Australian Net Filtering - Why is this not a big issue?



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