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Freedom Is Not My Enemy

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posted on Mar, 25 2010 @ 07:27 PM
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Originally posted by hawkiye
Originally posted by Janky Red
Originally posted by mnemeth1
Originally posted by Someone336



Somalia


right there, spot on

Big mean guys and concentrated big money begets more of the same there and filling the void left by a unified central governing body.

But the manipulation big money provides that creates the true miracles

[edit on 25-3-2010 by Janky Red]


What you seem to miss is that central government is always the biggest meanest guy on the block and the biggest usurper of rights by force there is. And why do people always try and equate freedom with places run by force like somalia.


Because Somalia is fairy close to what people are asking for, no permits, no FDA, no FCC, FDIC, CIA, FBI, buy what you want/sell what you want, take guns everywhere,
MORAL HAZARD abound, no seat belt laws, no means to collect tax at large.

It is free, no FED to help you (some UN but you can shoot them), you don't work you starve, no governmental compulsions, Build where you want, trade where you want, shoot want you want...

My problem is that the whole lot of you have different benchmarks of freedom-
you want no government interference and to rely on yourselves and your gun, private security

='s

Ceel Buur
Bargaal
Jamaame (lots of yummy unregulated un-iced fish)
-
OR SOMALIA



[edit on 25-3-2010 by Janky Red]




posted on Mar, 25 2010 @ 07:47 PM
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It hurts, badly, when you hit the "back" button before you mean to post.

Here's what I was going to say, in a nutshell:

Keynesian economics and the acceptance thereof is based at least by and large on academic hegemony that actively pushes out dissent and reaffirms popular points of view. This, in turn, is largely a result of the European college system imported by the sons of elite East-coast families searching for the phantom gravitas of aristocracy denied to them by virtue of their being simply Americans and nothing better.

Keynes was (and remains) popular among the powerful because his prescriptive economic policies allow politicians to make the case they are trying to fix a problem. Prior to Keynes, despots had to rely on naked force to change society in a prescribed way. This was not unusual; among tyrants, naked force is the first order solution to almost anything. After Keynes, tyrants could refer to Truth for authority instead of terror. And, as long as the trend-makers continued to produce "peer-reviewed studies" proclaiming that essentially whatever government spent was ultimately positive in its effect on the economy, the government would support the academic establishment in whichever ways were the most "progressive" or "productive" or "for the greater good" or what have you. In other words, it's a racket.

Mises was pushed out of the discourse completely when Keynes' epistemological system, positivism, ascended to the most-honored place in almost every field of university study during the forties and fifties. You saw in this era Skinner's behaviorism when it comes to psychology: Skinner made no attempts to look inside people's minds; he just looked at their "behaviors" scientifically. Keynes would say that he makes no attempts at moral certitude with his prescriptive theft-and-debt-and-redistribution schemes; just that he was looking at the science of numbers.

Positivism came under assault during the later half of the twentieth century, when the post-structuralists started challenging even the most basic units of communication. Now, there's something to be said about those deconstructionists as being agents of Marxist-socialist thought in many respects (see Howard Zinn), but their influence radiated throughout most areas of thought within the modern Western world, and along with the fall of the Berlin wall, proclaimed the end of the old way and the beginning of a new one.

Austrian economics is not just powerful for what it tells us about human action. It's even more instructive for what it tells us about the fragility and artificiality of our American expertism. It should be said that from the start, the modern American college system was designed for the following reasons: to give the "natural aristocracy" the gravitas they deserved, and to teach the common people the new Enlightened ways of thinking they would need to exist in the new American Aristocracy.

But, as usual, history repeats itself. The Modern era, its Mises and Keyneses both, are being washed away to replaced with something new and as-yet undefined. Mises' great flaw was his inability to flirt with the powers that be; Keynes great strength was his willingness to do just that. In short order, the powers that be are going to have to deal with their entire thought-system, the entire social construct that gives them power, collapsing (but in what way? I have no idea). Along with their power, anyone who has hitched his wagon to it is bound to fail.

We live in interesting times, my friends. Ultimately, Mises will be vindicated, because he never asked government to do anything for anyone. Keynes, I'm afraid, may not be so lucky.



posted on Mar, 26 2010 @ 12:06 AM
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Originally posted by Janky Red
I have no say in the contract (phone, cable, gas, water, loans) my only say is to go without since all of these entities have similar stipulations, so in my eyes this has been the biggest hit on my freedom, with private entities; financially, term and conditions, on my behalf.


Besides the gas/water issue, you have entered into a phone, loan, cable, etc by your own will. Those contracts you can shop around for, without fear of penalty in regards to if you decided to go without. Hell, even the water/gas ones you can go without and not fear retribution from the Government for failing to hold those utilities.

So those examples do not work with your point.

Being told by the Government that I must maintain health insurance or face fine/prison is being forced into a contract against my will. I can not own a phone, not pay cable, not take out a loan, etc and face only personal sacrifices of my own choosing.

I sacrificed those things for a couple of years to make sure my kids were fed, clothed, housed and had major medical/dental. Personal choice, personal freedom.



posted on Mar, 26 2010 @ 01:14 AM
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Originally posted by ownbestenemy

Originally posted by Janky Red
I have no say in the contract (phone, cable, gas, water, loans) my only say is to go without since all of these entities have similar stipulations, so in my eyes this has been the biggest hit on my freedom, with private entities; financially, term and conditions, on my behalf.


Besides the gas/water issue, you have entered into a phone, loan, cable, etc by your own will. Those contracts you can shop around for, without fear of penalty in regards to if you decided to go without. Hell, even the water/gas ones you can go without and not fear retribution from the Government for failing to hold those utilities.

So those examples do not work with your point.

Being told by the Government that I must maintain health insurance or face fine/prison is being forced into a contract against my will. I can not own a phone, not pay cable, not take out a loan, etc and face only personal sacrifices of my own choosing.

I sacrificed those things for a couple of years to make sure my kids were fed, clothed, housed and had major medical/dental. Personal choice, personal freedom.



Well this insurance compulsory thing is new and not effective- but good credo now

My point is I don't have much of a choice, if my phone company decides to spring a charge on me A# they will burrow into my account and take it B# they will ruin my credit score IF THEY THINK THEY ARE RIGHT - If you have never been whole heartedly hoodwinked and ripped off by a corporation and you contractual "agreement" you ARE a miracle, you should shrine yourself and charge admission.

I will tell you I have been royally screwed to the point of wanting to kill something, in that I guess I know how yall feel.



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