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Disputed Bay of Bengal island 'vanishes' say scientists

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posted on Mar, 24 2010 @ 12:32 PM
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Islands disappearing and reappearing have been recorded before during the age of sail, there's one notable case, but I can't (or don't want to) find it now.

These sailors would find a island, chart it, then another navigator would come to try find it only to find it was gone, until the next navigator found it again, then it disappeared by the next time another navigator came along.




posted on Mar, 24 2010 @ 12:39 PM
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Well, even without disputing the science- the fact this island is disputed, and India is drilling in this bay says a tad more than 2 words that have had more controversy than most people care to think about.



posted on Mar, 24 2010 @ 01:53 PM
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Your understanding of petroleum in situ is dismal. I'm sorry. That isn't how it works.

The rock continues to exist. The petroleum is in the porous spaces of the rock. It isn't in some sort of little undground lakes that fill with air or collapsed space.

It is sedimentary rock or shale usually. Maybe coal, or sands under pressure that aren't totally rock yet.

liteoilinvestments.com...


In the next link is a core sample picture of a rock that would contain petroleum.

www.netl.doe.gov...

[edit on 2010/3/24 by Aeons]

[edit on 2010/3/24 by Aeons]



posted on Mar, 24 2010 @ 02:14 PM
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Just a thought.....maybe expanding earth perhaps???





www.scientificamerican.com...

[edit on 24-3-2010 by freetree64]



posted on Mar, 24 2010 @ 02:14 PM
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reply to post by ModernAcademia
 


At the rate of 1 to 2 mm. sea level rise per year in that region, it is doubtful this island disappeared due to sea level rise!

Slower Sea Level Rise


Unnikrishnan and Shankar collected tide gauge data for a variety of stations located at coastal locations around the Indian Ocean (see Figure 1). They conducted a series of tests for inter-station consistency and they also adjusted the sea level measurements for vertical land movements. At the end of the day, they found that the corrected sea level rise in the region over the past five decades was indeed between 1–2 mm yr−1.


The sea levels have been rising gradually since the last ice age and the rate is not accelerating.



posted on Mar, 24 2010 @ 02:19 PM
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reply to post by Aeons
 


Ground is one thing. Ground under water is another. India has enough seismic crap going on thanks to them slowly sliding under those nice BIG mountains to the north as it is- so I am still saying they drilled and botched something up- and are sucking the gas out of somewhere that really shouldn't be messed with. What I'd love is to get my greasy lil paws on a 3rd party complete seismic and resource map, along with who's pulling out what.

Yes. I'm stubborn AND crazy.



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