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China Strikes Back at Google, Accuses U.S. of Cyberwarfare Campaign

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posted on Mar, 24 2010 @ 08:44 AM
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China Strikes Back at Google, Accuses U.S. of Cyberwarfare Campaign


www.dailytech.com

According to the Chinese government, the U.S. is committing a campaign of cyberwarfare against it (its claims echo those voiced by top U.S. armed forces officials, who conversely claim China is carrying out a cyberwarfare effort against the U.S.).

People’s Daily, the main newspaper of the Chinese Communist Party, on Wednesday unleashed serious accusations against Google. In a front-page piece it claims that Google, the second largest search engine in China, and one of the largest companies in the U.S., is colluding with U.S. espionage efforts.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Mar, 24 2010 @ 08:44 AM
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How far is too far? Does Google have the right to circumvent China's wish to limit Google search results?

Should a corporation be able to do as they please, and at the same time put the Obama Admin in a difficult position?

While I am all for the principle behind Google's action, I am not sure this is the route to get there.

This could be trouble.

www.dailytech.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Mar, 24 2010 @ 08:59 AM
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reply to post by SaveTheDrama
 


I think google is with in there rights and I am pleased. China is a horrible place (the government, not the people) they censor the evil things about them, so go google, you cant have freedom if its censored.



posted on Mar, 24 2010 @ 09:14 AM
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I support google on this one.

China needs to be reformed, maybe Nancy Pelosi can get on that since HC is done with.

Until then we have google making a stand.

Good for them.



posted on Mar, 24 2010 @ 09:36 AM
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As I said in the OP, I am behind the principle, but I am uncomfortable with a corporation trying to impose it's will over a country.

China is already accusing the US government being involved with this stand by Google.

Can this accusation be true? If not, then hasn't a company just put the country in a tight spot in regards to diplomacy between US - China? Is it the US's responsibility to tell China how to run their country, when our own house is in dire straits?

Pelosi and the rest of Congress should be working to improve the US economic stiuation first and foremost, leave the inter nation relations to the Obama administration.



posted on Mar, 24 2010 @ 09:37 AM
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Originally posted by SaveTheDrama

Should a corporation be able to do as they please, and at the same time put the Obama Admin in a difficult position?



Yes they should. They are a privately owned entity and reserve the right to provide or refuse their services to whoever they wish.

I think the real question is whether the Obama Admin or China should be able to dictate who Google supply their services to.

Good for Google for sticking to their guns!



posted on Mar, 24 2010 @ 09:42 AM
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Yes they should. They are a privately owned entity and reserve the right to provide or refuse their services to whoever they wish.


That's fine, but does that include the deceptive practice of bypassing the Chinese censors and redirecting the .cn google searchs to HongKong, which is uncensored?

provide or refuse is one thing, redirecting is another in my book.

They want to make a stand then refuse service.



posted on Mar, 24 2010 @ 09:42 AM
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I have my doubts about this. I have no evidence but I don't trust Google's motives in this.

They don't make much money in China, so why bother if they have to change things up and deal with a crazy government that wants total control? Are they a publicly traded company that needs to show profits, and if so, then would it not be easier to just pull out of China and not deal with the headache?

I'm just not sure I can buy into all this altruism about free speech. It's China, we may not agree with their rules but it is what it is. If a company in China was pulling out of the US, in a similar situation, would we even care? I don't think so as we would make a product to take up the slack, I would think.

Do the people of China even know they are censored, and how much they are not privy too? Do they even care if Google is there, as they have other options and all are censored? What is the big deal, as they have other search engines that are doing better business than Google?

Something does not sit right with me on this one. I may be wrong but it's no stretch of the imagination to see a corporation do something to make money. It is their goal.



posted on Mar, 24 2010 @ 06:22 PM
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reply to post by TheLoony
 


This one seems more principle than profit to me, question is, are they doing this on their own or could they be doing this under some higher direction?

Lots of questions regarding this move.



posted on Mar, 24 2010 @ 06:51 PM
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I concur with many sentiments so far...

Poor China. Wants all the development and trappings of an advanced country, but without the free press! Of course, a free press would be the nail in the coffin of the megalomaniac one party Communist machine. If only the suppressed Chinese knew the truth, but then internet offers the path to truth. Chairman Mao was not a fluffy bunny – his policies killed off millions of your brethren!

Ironic that a controlled newspaper can be so vitriolic against a free Google! I support Google and wait for the day when the suppressed Chinese begin to find out what is going.

A little knowledge is a dangerous thing...

Regards



posted on Mar, 25 2010 @ 08:17 AM
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Go Daddy follows Google's actions with their own:



www.insidebayarea.com


A second prominent Internet company has joined Google in rejecting Chinese surveillance and censorship rules, as Google's move to stop filtering its Chinese search results draws more attention to Internet freedom in Washington.
Saying it hosts many individual Web sites considered politically sensitive by the Chinese government, the Go Daddy Group said Wednesday it would stop hosting new sites with ".cn" domain names, rather than comply with government requirements to provide increasingly detailed information about its Chinese customers.
The world's largest Internet domain name registrar told a congressional panel that its China operations had come under increasingly stringent surveillance rules since December. Chinese authorities demanded in February that Go Daddy, which hosts Web sites tied to Tibet and the Tiananmen Square uprising of 1989, provide color photographs and signed registration forms for all Chinese owners of its 27,000 .cn domain sites, said Go Daddy general counsel Christine Jones.



This article does show cooperation from members of Congress, in support of the two companies efforts, as well as a finger pointing directly at Microsoft which could be pressure to get them to follow Google and GoDaddy's lead in this action.



posted on Mar, 25 2010 @ 09:46 AM
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Ah.. I missed the news on the attacks in January which seem to bring a bit more clarity as to why these actions are happening now.

here's a related piece which helped me to understand this current situation.


www.totaltele.com

Incursions that could potentially dislodge Google from world's biggest Internet market may go unsolved.
Google Inc.'s decision earlier this week to dodge China's Internet censorship came roughly three months after the cyberattacks that set off the imbroglio were detected. Yet the attacks have yet to be definitively traced.

The lack of closure in the ongoing investigation into the incursions, which targeted intellectual property at dozens of companies other than Google, highlights the increasingly sophisticated nature of cybercrime.

It's also an indication that the breaches--which have now helped potentially dislodge Google from the world's largest Internet market, while helping roil Sino-American relations--may well go unsolved.



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