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In Search of Alien Glyphs (or are they microwave blasters?)

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posted on Mar, 23 2010 @ 09:51 PM
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In Search of Alien Glyphs (or are they microwave blasters?)


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In Search of Alien Glyphs (or are they microwave blasters?)
Jacques Vallee at 11:12 AM March 23, 2010


Jacques Vallee is a computer scientist, partner in a venture capital firm, and author of more than 20 books, including Passport to Magonia: From Folklore to Flying Saucers, The Invisible College, and The Network Revolution.

In Sept. 1991, I published in a New Age magazine my own hypothesis about the Crop Circles phenomenon. I speculated they involved a military aerial device (not a space-based instrument) for generating such designs using focused microwave beams, such as a "maser.
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posted on Mar, 23 2010 @ 09:51 PM
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This is a very interesting theory. What is interesting about it is that it does account for the nodal implosions on the stalks of wheat, which most so-called sceptics ignore outright.. Occam s razor (how I hate using that trope but if the shoe fits...) implies that earth based explanations should be used before extra-solar ones. I am wondering what do people think?

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posted on Mar, 23 2010 @ 10:18 PM
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Originally posted by liquidself
This is a very interesting theory. What is interesting about it is that it does account for the nodal implosions on the stalks of wheat, which most so-called sceptics ignore outright.. Occam s razor (how I hate using that trope but if the shoe fits...) implies that earth based explanations should be used before extra-solar ones. I am wondering what do people think?


Nodal implosions and explosions are natural reactions caused by the trampling and bending of the crops during the making of the crop circle. The weight of the device and person smashing the crops damages the nodes. After the nodes have been damaged, the crop has trouble circulating fluids and dries out in the light/sun. This causes the nodes to become burnt looking, like they were cooked. This burnt look is common on every plant in existence when they are drying out, and have little water.

The nodes are there to assist the crop in bending. It is like an elbow or knee on a human. When these crops are smashed down to make the crop circle, their weakest point is the node. When the node bends, the sides of the node split, like a banana peel splits down the sides. This damages the crops and causes the crops to dry out much faster than if they were not damaged.

It is a natural reaction that a LOT of plant and crop experts already know.

People have been fooled and mislead by false science thinking the crops were subject to microwaves. A man once put crops in a microwave and found that a microwave created similar looking effects as the crop circle crops. He concluded it was microwaves based off of really dumb conclusions.

The sun has the same effect as a microwave on damaged crops. Because the crops were damaged, the crops were being dried out by the sun by the time researchers were notified about the crop circle and traveled to the circle to take samples.

The whole microwave deal is a never ending myth that needs to be put to rest once and for all...


[edit on 23-3-2010 by ALLis0NE]



posted on Mar, 23 2010 @ 11:40 PM
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reply to post by ALLis0NE
 


What I gathered from the story, is that now all those clandestine groups of cropcircle makers will now have a more technological way of making their crops!

There's a great deal of UFO research out there which is more than worthy of research. Trying to push crop circles into the mix de-legitimizes the rest. Now there are definitely claims of anomalous activity going on. But all the claims have been addressed and explained completely.

There's also claims of magnetic anomalies, or rare-earth elements residue, which is what got me interested in this subject, but it turns out that that's all they were... claims. No laboratory studies have ever been conducted on this "residue", a fact which directly debunks the "rare-earth elements" claim.

The fact that we KNOW some are man-made, and that there has been an upward trend in complexity since they began in the 70s (unlike UFOs which have been here for many thousands of years) probably would be evidence enough for most people. But when you get people making bogus claims, readily parroted by media and the want-to-believers, it makes it very difficult for the average person to separate the truth from the hype.
Cheers



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