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Concerning masonry (not the brickwork type)

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posted on Jun, 1 2004 @ 02:58 PM
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Originally posted by infinite
...something calling me to become a mason. Anyways, lets hope i get accepted at 21


If you were in California you could be accepted at the age of 18




posted on Jun, 1 2004 @ 03:00 PM
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I'd say we're 50/50.
Some say Geometry. Some say God. But most say both.



posted on Jun, 1 2004 @ 03:29 PM
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Hmmm... that is interesting.

In the Canadian rite, we have little talk about Geometry, other than a few important comments during the second degree lecture, but nothing like what you're saying. I don't know what happens in the York Rite, which is supposed to be a lot closer to what you do.

We get a little more talk about geometry in the Scottish Rite, but even then not much (and, again, our Scottish Rite ritual is different from both the Northern and Southern Jurisdictions). I had heard from someone that the Canadian Rite is close to what's called the "Emulation" Work. I only have books of the Work for Canadian and York, though, so I can neither confirm nor deny.



posted on Jun, 3 2004 @ 07:02 AM
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Now... I've read that there are officially only three degrees within masonry, although some claim to rise far higher. Who's right?



posted on Jun, 3 2004 @ 07:05 AM
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There are 33 degrees.
But the first 3 are the 3 that every mason must have and there is no degree higher than the 3rd. All of the others are side degrees.



posted on Jun, 3 2004 @ 07:09 AM
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So the higher ones aren't higher just on a different point of the same plane? So to speak ?



posted on Jun, 3 2004 @ 07:44 AM
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As I said, they are what we call "side degrees". Maybe some of the other masons on the board will disagree and say that they stand alone, but in my opinion they are there to help illustrate the meanings of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd and to help you to build on them. The other degrees that I'm in, here in the UK, tend to point to this.

We are certainly told that there is no degree greater than the 3rd. It is referred to as the "sublime" degree.



posted on Jun, 3 2004 @ 07:51 AM
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So that third degree takes a fair bit of work to get to then?



posted on Jun, 3 2004 @ 08:12 AM
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Not necessarily. If you mean how easy is it to obtain, it's normally a short period of time (within a year) before a mason receives it.

But if you mean "to get" as in "to understand", yes it is a tremendous amount of work. One of the parts of the 3rd is the study of oneself and who can truly say that they know all there is to know about theirself ? In my opinion, a mason can spend a whole lifetime just studying this one single facet.

Here in the UK it takes decades to get the amount of degrees that a US mason can receive in a relatively short time. But in my opinion, this doesn't matter. Everything is about understanding those first 3.



posted on Jun, 3 2004 @ 08:23 AM
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Originally posted by Leveller
In my opinion, a mason can spend a whole lifetime just studying this one single facet.

Here in the UK it takes decades to get the amount of degrees that a US mason can receive in a relatively short time. But in my opinion, this doesn't matter. Everything is about understanding those first 3.


I agree totally with Leveller... I am in Japan and in the Scottish Lodge. We are not in the Scottish rite, so no 33 degrees for us to get. Although I could join Scottish Rite lodge here and do it. Here in Japan you can get the 32nd degree within 2 days. As you have heard for Leveller a long time. In the York rite here in Japan, it takes a long time also to get degree work done. But basically, Official masonry stops at 3rd degree. (hmmm. maybe a bad way to say it.. ) Once a Master Mason, you are just as equal as a 33rd degree. Although, the ones that get 33rd degree are usually very experienced. Like I said, here in Japan it is 2 days, but you must be very experienced in order to do the degrees.

Yes, there are tons of stuff, many debates and very fascinating to study.



posted on Jun, 3 2004 @ 11:12 AM
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Agreed , there are the 3 degrees. Which always makes me think of the sining group and other side orders.

I am UK UGLE. Every experienced Mason will tell you the same.

Masonry is a community of equals, its just that some are more equal than others.



posted on Jun, 3 2004 @ 11:54 AM
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Why I got involved in masonry:

I got interested in masonry because most of the older men I had respect for were involved. I was drinking coffee with a group, and one of them noted that I was the only non-mason present. I started asking questions and it went from there.

How did I get involved?

I asked how to join, and one of them gave me a petition to fill out. Then a group of them made an appointment to visit my home and talk with me and the Mrs. Doktor. They wanted to make sure it was o.k. with my wife for me to join, and assure her that masonry was an ethical org. They held a vote, and the whole lodge voted to invite me. We scheduled an evening for the initiation, and it went from there.

Any Evil Secrets?

I am a Master mason in the blue lodge, have attained the 18th degree of the Scottish Rite, and a Knight Templar in the (American) York rite.
I can honestly say that I believe Masonry is the original fraternity. There is no HAZING involving any kind of physical abuse. There is some suspense in the ceremonies, but I was constantly reassured that no harm would come to me and I never felt threatened by anything. All other frats I have seen involved some kind of torture or "hazing" which I absolutely refuse to be involved in. Masonry is about ideals and values, and not about being a club or "in" group. The copycats are all degenerate imitations in my opinion.

Activity.
I have not been actively attending the lodge for about 6 months, due to changes in my job and moving. My Scottish Rite membership is past due, but my blue lodge and York rite are up to date. I don't currently hold any appointed office, because I knew the work changes were coming.

I am an avid reader on the history of freemasonry, particularly its historical roots and the esoterica underlying its symbolic language.



posted on Jun, 3 2004 @ 01:47 PM
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Originally posted by Oisin
Now... I've read that there are officially only three degrees within masonry, although some claim to rise far higher. Who's right?


The degrees of Entered Apprentice, Fellow Craft, and Master Mason are the only ones universally recognized as Freemasonry. Since the 1720s, other degrees have been written and introduced into groups or series called Rites, such as the Scottish Rite, York Rite, Egyptian Rite, etc. All of these Rites control their own degrees, which are not recognized by the other Rites.
Master Masons in good standing are eligible for membership in any of the Rites.

Fiat Lvx.



posted on Jun, 4 2004 @ 07:47 AM
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Cheers guys and girls.



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