It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Concerning masonry (not the brickwork type)

page: 1
0
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 1 2004 @ 11:08 AM
link   
Several questions. Firstly;

How would a person go about becoming a mason?
How much truth is there in a "sinister" side to the association (Basically stories about blood rituals, dark magic etc)
Whilst there are tiers, is there an "inner sanctum" which can only by breached by birthright or some other means of being chosen?

Basically, what's it all about? I know very little about masons and haven't made up my mind by reading mosts of these threads, and still associate it (as many laymen do) with underground chambers and chicken's blood. So what's the truth about it?




posted on Jun, 1 2004 @ 11:12 AM
link   
Grand lodge of England, you have to be 21,male and have to believe in some sort of God.



How much truth is there in a "sinister" side to the association (Basically stories about blood rituals, dark magic etc)


Well i've met a few freemasons and they do not seem the type that would be envolved with dark magic,etc.



Basically, what's it all about?


Search google and on here. This is probably the 10,000th thread on "what are freemasons"



posted on Jun, 1 2004 @ 11:26 AM
link   
Granted, but I was hoping to hear from the horse's mouth of someone who was a mason rather than on a website which could have taken it's sources from anywhere. Wonder what'd happen if I applied your method to the question, "What is judaism" and expected to take some of the right wing sites answers as truth? You see what I'm trying to say here, right?



posted on Jun, 1 2004 @ 11:27 AM
link   

Originally posted by Oisin
Granted, but I was hoping to hear from the horse's mouth of someone who was a mason rather than on a website which could have taken it's sources from anywhere. Wonder what'd happen if I applied your method to the question, "What is judaism" and expected to take some of the right wing sites answers as truth? You see what I'm trying to say here, right?


thats the official grand lodge of the UK, their sources come from they own staff. There are masons on this board, but i think their are sick and tired of people accussing them of being satanic servents.

[Edited on 1-6-2004 by infinite]



posted on Jun, 1 2004 @ 11:28 AM
link   
www.freemason.org

It is the Grand Lodge of California's website. Be patiant, if the Masons on this board don't think you to be a troll, they will be more then helpful.



posted on Jun, 1 2004 @ 11:29 AM
link   

Originally posted by Darktalon
www.freemason.org

It is the Grand Lodge of California's website. Be patiant, if the Masons on this board don't think you to be a troll, they will be more then helpful.


well said, our friendly masons have been targetted by trolls in the last few months.



posted on Jun, 1 2004 @ 11:32 AM
link   
Ah, now we're getting somewhere, I didn't actually think they'd have an official website, what with being a secret society (well, not strictly secret but fringe).

Next question; In Britain, a mandate was brought in dictating that all those occupying positions in government, civil service, police etc would have to reveal their status as freemasons. Have any masons on this board come into difficulty in their daily life due to scepticism about their lifestyle choice?



posted on Jun, 1 2004 @ 11:37 AM
link   
Any government personnal, civil service, police have to reveal their status on any secret society, not just Freemasons. According to freemasons, their society is not secret, just the meetings. I've spoken to many UK masons and they have not had any problems in their daily lifes, most people respected the fact that they were masons. It might take some time for masons to reply to this thread, the masons might think your a troll. Don't be offended if no mason posts here



posted on Jun, 1 2004 @ 11:39 AM
link   
Gotcha
And yeah you're right, you have to reveal your status for other societies too but I didn't feel they were pertanent (what a lovely word...) to this post.



posted on Jun, 1 2004 @ 11:51 AM
link   

Originally posted by Oisin
How would a person go about becoming a mason?


It is required that a person who wishes to become a Mason requests admission. This request can be made to any Master Mason, who will submit the request to the Lodge’s Membership Committee. If one does not know a Mason, he can generally make his request online to the Lodge’s website.


How much truth is there in a "sinister" side to the association (Basically stories about blood rituals, dark magic etc)


Freemasonry does not use “blood rituals”, or any other superstitious nonsense. Our fraternity was originally guild for stonemasons in medieval England, which was transformed into a gentleman’s club in the 17th century. In the 18th century, Freemasonry adopted the ideals of the Age of Enlightenment, and a new ritual was instituted to reflect enlightenment teachings. For example, the tools of the stonemason which were presented to the candidate were retained, but a symbolic and philosophical meaning was attached to them. The level, which stonemasons used to lay brick and stone equally, became a symbol in Freemasonry of equality under the law.
The ritual of Freemasonry is very dignified and artistic, having been composed by philosophers and poets of the Enlightenment.



Whilst there are tiers, is there an "inner sanctum" which can only by breached by birthright or some other means of being chosen?


There is no “inner sanctum” in the sense of an actual group within Masonry. But it is certain that those who diligently study and practice Masonry are more knowledgable than those who never even attend Lodge. In this sense, there is an “inner sanctum”, which is open to any Brother who cares enough to study, and put Masonic philosophy into practice.


Basically, what's it all about? I know very little about masons and haven't made up my mind by reading mosts of these threads, and still associate it (as many laymen do) with underground chambers and chicken's blood. So what's the truth about it?


In brief, as mentioned above, the fraternity in its modern form began as a place where men who accepted the Enlightenment could congregate. They were interested in the new philosophies and sciences (such as classical liberalism and Newtonian physics), which were being attacked by the Roman Catholic Church as heretical. The Masons believed in God, but considered the Church to be superstitious and oppressive, and delighted in the fraternity’s religious tolerance and free thought. Many of the most important philosophers of he Enlightenment were Masons, including Voltaire, Benjamin Franklin, Diderot, and Edward Gibbon.
Therefore, Freemasonry is both a philosophical and fraternal organization. Today, it continues its tradition of promulgating the ideals of the Enlightenment, which led Europe out of the dark ages.

Fiat Lvx.



posted on Jun, 1 2004 @ 11:53 AM
link   
excellent post Masonic Light
true,honest words of a freemason. I have to wait till i am 21 to join



posted on Jun, 1 2004 @ 12:32 PM
link   


I have to wait till i am 21 to join




More questions; Why do you want to join, and what makes you certain that you will be accepted?

And one final one, if you are the son of a mason, does this guarantee you entry? (I wouldn't have thought so myself, but it's one of those things you hear).



posted on Jun, 1 2004 @ 01:35 PM
link   

Originally posted by Oisin

More questions; Why do you want to join, and what makes you certain that you will be accepted?


I wanted to join after studying the fraternity’s history and teachings, having developed deep respect for them.
One cannot be certain that he will be accepted; however, the fraternity is always looking for “a few good men” who will be the Masonic leaders and scholars of tomorrow. To be accepted, one must meet the following qualifications: he must believe in the existence of Deity, must have an upright moral character, must be of full age, and must declare on his honor that he seeks admission only for his desire of knowledge and love of virtue without any mercenary motives.
After filling out his membership application, called a petition, it is read to the Lodge at a stated meeting. The Master will then appoint a Committee to interview the applicant, get to know him, and give him and his family the opportunity to ask questions. The Committee will then report back to the Lodge, and give their recommendation. If they recommend the petitioner be accepted, a secret ballot will be cast, with everyone in the Lodge entitled to one vote. If his approval is unanimous, the Master will declare him elected to be made an Entered Apprentice, and will set the date for his initiation.



And one final one, if you are the son of a mason, does this guarantee you entry?


No, each petitioner must undergo the above procedure, which is required by the Constitution of the Grand Lodge, which governs the fraternity. This is so even if he is the son of a Lodge member, and is well-known by the Brethren. My Lodge recently initiated a young man who was the son of one of our members who has served three terms as Master. Most everyone in the Lodge had known this young man since he was a small child, and were excited about having him join us, but we had to follow standard procedure.

Fiat Lvx.



posted on Jun, 1 2004 @ 01:46 PM
link   
Since we are discussing the rudiments of Masonry, could one of our Masons please elaborate of the symbol?


I understand about the two masonry items, but what about the "G". I also see this on the outside of Lodges near my home.
Thanks



posted on Jun, 1 2004 @ 02:01 PM
link   
G is the initial of Geometry, by whose perfection we can see the very hand of god in His cretation, and it is also the initial of the name of god.

It is primarily found within the square and compass in the United States.

The square denotes morality and the compasses remind us to circumscribe our desires and to keep our passions within due bounds.



posted on Jun, 1 2004 @ 02:08 PM
link   
Masonry is so interesting to me and it appeals to me. As far as i no, no one in my family is a freemason and i want to be the first. Ever since i've looked into freemasonry, the feeling of wanting to join built up inside me. Its hard to explain, but it's like something calling me to become a mason. Anyways, lets hope i get accepted at 21



posted on Jun, 1 2004 @ 02:09 PM
link   

Originally posted by theron dunn


It is primarily found within the square and compass in the United States.



We use it over here in the UK too. My Provincial Handbook has the S&C with a G in the middle on the cover.



posted on Jun, 1 2004 @ 02:10 PM
link   

Originally posted by DontTreadOnMe
I understand about the two masonry items, but what about the "G". I also see this on the outside of Lodges near my home.
Thanks


The Letter G denotes Geometry, the first and noblest of sciences, and the basis upon which the superstructure of Masonry is erected. (“Mackey’s Encyclopedia of Freemasonry” by Dr. Albert G. Mackey, 33°).
The Greek philosopher Pythagoras is considered a Masonic Adept not only because he was an initiate of the Egyptian Mysteries, but also because he solved the 47th Problem of Euclid, which states that in every right triangle, the square sum of the base and perpendicular is equal to that of the hypotenuse. This was where the concept of “squaring” and “cubing” numbers arrived, which gave birth to geometric algebra and calculus. The Pythagorean Theorem is of the utmost importance for architects when drawing plans for the erection of a building, thus its importance to the stonemasons. In England, the 47th Problem of Euclid is worn in the form of a jewel by Past Masters.
Another reason the Letter G is so highly revered among Masons is that the Pythagoreans (as well as the Platonists and Aristotelians) considered Mathematics to be divine, because its proofs were indisputable, outlining the Laws of Nature.

Fiat Lvx.





[Edited on 1-6-2004 by Masonic Light]



posted on Jun, 1 2004 @ 02:19 PM
link   
We have a different "canonical" explanation of the G in my jurisdiction. In the Canadian rite, the G denotes God. Secondarily, it may be thought of as denoting geometry (or gemetria, if you want to get downright complicated), but canonically, God. The G is placed in the centre just as the motivating force of the Deity is at the centre of our being, and every spiritual temple (the temple of the inner man (or woman)), that temple not built with hands, out to be dedicated to the service of the Deity. This Geometry thing is just a faintly-hinted-at alternate explanation up here



posted on Jun, 1 2004 @ 02:42 PM
link   
Alex, that’s pretty interesting. In American and English Lodges, a large emphasis is placed on Geometry. The Second Degree Lecture here has a 20 minute portion about nothing but Geometry. The Geometry portion of the Lecture is one that I consider the most beautiful and inspiring in all of Masonry, as it touches upon all the sciences that have been discovered by man using Geometry as the basis.

Fiat Lvx.



new topics

top topics



 
0
<<   2 >>

log in

join