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Uh oh..Lookout...Many quakes on the Juan De Fuca Plate...Oregon

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posted on Mar, 12 2010 @ 04:53 PM
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Just today, two 4+ magnitude quakes have hit off the Oregon Coast, at nearly the same place on the Juan De Fuca Plate.

earthquake.usgs.gov...

But there have also been a 2.5 and another 3.3 recently on the southern edges of the plate. You can see them on the map, look close.

Something most definitely to keep an eye on, because we all know what could happen if that thing decides to move...Not good. At all.

Whoa, there have been many more than that in the last week on the southern edges of this plate:

earthquake.usgs.gov...

[edit on Fri Mar 12th 2010 by TrueAmerican]




posted on Mar, 12 2010 @ 05:18 PM
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I'm watching it closely myself. 2 big shakes of my screen today is enough to make me a little nervous.



posted on Mar, 12 2010 @ 05:31 PM
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I'm here on the coast of Northern California and this will be keeping me more On the Edge than usual!


Great Subduction Zone earthquakes are the largest earthquakes in the world, and can exceed magnitude 9.0. Earthquake size is porportional to fault area, and the Cascadia Subduction Zone is a very long sloping fault that stretches from mid-Vancouver Island to Northern California. It separates the Juan de Fuca and North America plates. Because of the very large fault area, the Cascadia Subduction Zone could produce a very large earthquake, magnitude 9.0 or greater, if rupture occurred over its whole area.



www.pnsn.org...



posted on Mar, 12 2010 @ 05:33 PM
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good thing pressure is being relieved slowly.
this could be a good sign, actually.

but thanks for the heads up...will be watching closely now.



posted on Mar, 12 2010 @ 05:41 PM
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While I do expect we will see a big one soon, Oregon is no stranger to swarms of smaller quakes. They happen around here all the time, and go unnoticed.



posted on Mar, 12 2010 @ 05:42 PM
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Reply to post by double_frick
 


Out of curiosity . . . how sure are we that pressure is beings relieved and this is not a build up?


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Mar, 12 2010 @ 05:44 PM
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I hadnt seen this, but i am predicting a huge event in the Oregon, Washington state area for Tuesday the 16th.

That date has been on my mind for a long time.



posted on Mar, 12 2010 @ 05:45 PM
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Unfortunately the top of the Juan de Fuca plate and the North American plate are locked together. This isn't a good thing; in the event they do decide to split the resulting earthquake will be devastating.

The Cascadia Subduction zone which is between the Cascade Mountain Range and the Pacific usually has a major quake every 200 - 1000 years; the last one was 300 years ago which resulted in a devastating tsunami so we re due for one any time.

Seattle which already has problems with earth slides is sitting on Lawton clay on top of bed rock. When the clay becomes saturated with water it becomes very unstable; an earthquake of the magnitude possible from the Cascadia Subduction Zone coupled with building on Lawton clay could cause damage on a massive scale.

It's amazing how geologically active the Pacific Northwest really is.



posted on Mar, 12 2010 @ 05:49 PM
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reply to post by double_frick
 


the small quakes associated with volcanic activity is usually a release of pressure, if no volcanic activity is present, it does not mean any pressure is being released, in fact it can mean it can go either way, either building for a bigger quake or the end of the quakes



posted on Mar, 12 2010 @ 05:52 PM
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My opinion might sound a little biased, but Oregon is the last place I would like an earthquake to happen.

LOL

Just had to throw out my thoughts on the subject.



posted on Mar, 12 2010 @ 05:54 PM
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If it's a subduction zone, is there a possibility of the area sucking up a whole lot of water when it quakes, and causing even more problems?



posted on Mar, 12 2010 @ 06:20 PM
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reply to post by Phlynx
 


Yes we would see a giant tsunami and so would... japan. It wouldnt be a good quake at all.

Quakes that arent giant dont mean they are releasing pressure. It would also take a ton of 3.0 + quakes to equal a 9.0+ quake.



posted on Mar, 12 2010 @ 06:21 PM
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reply to post by Phlynx
 


A subduction zone is where the nose of one plate, in this case the Juan de Fuca plate is subducting or going under the leading edge of another plate, in this case the North American Plate. Earthquakes originating in a subduction zone such as the Cascadia Subduction Zone can be massive and devastating.



posted on Mar, 12 2010 @ 06:23 PM
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Originally posted by dgtempe
I hadnt seen this, but i am predicting a huge event in the Oregon, Washington state area for Tuesday the 16th.

That date has been on my mind for a long time.


And what, oh dearest one, would cause you to predict that? You got barking dogs, running animals, wailing cats, or what?



posted on Mar, 12 2010 @ 06:23 PM
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reply to post by whoshotJR
 


Exactly it isn't the quake sucking up water but rather the shock sending out a massive tsunami. Quakes essentially pose three major risks, the initial quake itself, the possible resulting tsunami and the aftershocks.



posted on Mar, 12 2010 @ 06:28 PM
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reply to post by gallopinghordes
 


Well, I am still waiting for someone to come along and point out that these quakes in this position on the plate are normal, everyday occurrences, so we have nothing to worry about...Until then, I've got every station in GEE on the west coast open I can get my hands on.

Pssst...Phage... umm, how about a "bring us back to earther" on this one, eh?



posted on Mar, 12 2010 @ 06:33 PM
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reply to post by TrueAmerican
 
Its more of a gut feeling...I cant explain it, honestly. I'm not basing it on mathematics or the Sun or anything rational.

Must be careful TUESDAY (this is the tip off



posted on Mar, 12 2010 @ 06:33 PM
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A number of my co-workers and I have been watching the USGS map of earthquakes since the massive Chili earthquake. We've been on edge since the number of quakes have been on the rise worldwide. Before I left work today I did not noticed these two quakes off the Oregon coast. We're going to have a bit to talk about when they see these two quakes on the map tomorrow. I wonder if we will be seeing more quakes along this Juan De Fuca plate.



posted on Mar, 12 2010 @ 06:36 PM
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reply to post by gallopinghordes
 


Just be careful. Really.



posted on Mar, 12 2010 @ 06:44 PM
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Originally posted by lostinspace
A number of my co-workers and I have been watching the USGS map of earthquakes since the massive Chili earthquake. We've been on edge since the number of quakes have been on the rise worldwide. Before I left work today I did not noticed these two quakes off the Oregon coast. We're going to have a bit to talk about when they see these two quakes on the map tomorrow. I wonder if we will be seeing more quakes along this Juan De Fuca plate.


Well, it's more than two...you see the second link in the OP? Part of the reason for me posting this is because of the position of all those quakes right on edges of the plate...Still trying to figure out if they are out of the ordinary or not.

I looked up the 4.3 from today, and here is the historic tensor moment solution:

neic.usgs.gov...

From the looks of that, it is somewhat uncommon for quakes to occur in those positions on the plate, but it has happened before, as you can see. Let's just hope it is nothing, but keep our eyes peeled.

[edit on Fri Mar 12th 2010 by TrueAmerican]





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