NanoKnife: Cancer Breakthrough Without Radiation or Drugs

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posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 02:22 AM
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reply to post by stars15k
 


Stars15k.....

I will find out.....

- If the NanoKnife has been used for a clinical application similar to this (I don't think it has been)

- To whom your enquiry might be best directed in this instance

It will probably take me several days to get this info for you.

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not




posted on Jul, 10 2010 @ 10:49 PM
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Absolutely brilliant MMN! I too hope this will not be buried technology


Ya gotta love technology!



posted on Jul, 10 2010 @ 10:54 PM
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Originally posted by KIZZZY

Absolutely brilliant MMN! I too hope this will not be buried technology


Ya gotta love technology!


KIZZZY my friend!

Everybody is working extremely hard to develop the clinical application of this technology.

It's just that this advanced oncology technology area is SO complicated!

Their are some extremely intelligent, decent & hard working people trying their best to perfect all this.

Some of the Drs & Professors leading the way clinically are truly incredible, as are the people from the company side.

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not



posted on Jul, 10 2010 @ 11:05 PM
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reply to post by Maybe...maybe not
 



I wonder if this procedure would work for my granddaughter - she is 3 years old. She has a rare birth defect (tubular sclerosis) which causes tumors thru out the body, especially the brain. She now has 2 brain tumors and one behind her eye. She is going to a specialists next month in another state that specializes in her condition. There are less than 1000 babies diagnosed with this each year. I am going to copy the info from this site to give to her Mother so she can mention the possibility of this procedure. They have already said due to her age they do not want to perform open surgery.

Thank you very much for the information provided, much appreciated.



posted on Jul, 11 2010 @ 12:44 AM
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Originally posted by crazydaisy
reply to post by Maybe...maybe not
 

I wonder if this procedure would work for my granddaughter - she is 3 years old. She has a rare birth defect (tubular sclerosis) which causes tumors thru out the body, especially the brain. She now has 2 brain tumors and one behind her eye. She is going to a specialists next month in another state that specializes in her condition. There are less than 1000 babies diagnosed with this each year. I am going to copy the info from this site to give to her Mother so she can mention the possibility of this procedure. They have already said due to her age they do not want to perform open surgery.
Thank you very much for the information provided, much appreciated.


Crazydaisy.....

How tough is that!


It's just that the NanoKnife is so new!

It has not been used for brain tumours because of the concern about the high level electrical fields & the access problems

I note the early canine cerbral glioma trials as per my previous post, but that is a "long way" from applying the technology to such a complex condition in a small child.

I'm also very certain it hasn't been used in children at all, let alone a child as young as your granddaughter

The nature of the recurrence of lesions caused by the tubular sclerosis condition also leads to management problems, as the procedure is extremely expensive & it would need to be applied many times. It also raises the risks associated with multiple anaesthetics, etc...

The size of the lesions can also be a problem. If the lesion is too small, the NanoKnife cannot establish an IRE field with which to deactivate the tumour.

On top of all that, you would need to find an extremely skilled interventional radiologist that could also handle high-end interventional neuroradiology.....& that person would also have to be skilled with the NanoKnife.

All in all, I know this would be an extremely arduous & pioneering application of this technology, if indeed it was judged to be suitable at all.....which frankly & with my most humble apologies, I doubt.

Nevertheless, I will direct an enquiry & see what transpires.

Again, I most humbly apologise if my post appears negative or discouraging, in my efforts to provide useful information.

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not



posted on Jul, 11 2010 @ 01:18 AM
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reply to post by Maybe...maybe not
 



I very much appreciate your reply. I would rather you tell me the truth than to just give me false hopes. Perhaps one day it will be used for brain tumors and on children. It is good that you have brought this forth, many could benefit from this procedure.

Peace



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 12:58 AM
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ATS Team:

Here is another interesting report pertaining to the NanoKnife.

If you follows the link, you can see an executive summary.

If you want the complete report, you will need to purchase it.

www.tcrt.org...

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 05:39 PM
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ATS Team:

The Global Centre For Medical Innovation (Georgia, USA) will soon implement NanoKnife technology.

www.bizjournals.com...

Kind regards
Maybe…maybe not



posted on Jul, 20 2010 @ 01:33 AM
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im not a doctor but as far as Im concerned there is more than enough evidence in Edward Griffin's book World Without Cancer: The Strory Of Vitamin B17 to show cancer is a vitamin defiecency disease similar to scurvy. It also really sheds light as to why we have had no real progress in the cure for cancer despite billions of dollars being poured into the cause over several decades. I highly recommend this book to anyone wishing to learn more about cancer, cancer treatment, and the FDA. Really fascinating stuff.



posted on Jul, 20 2010 @ 03:57 AM
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reply to post by Maybe...maybe not
 


50 dollars...

well, anyway I uploaded the fulltext pdf to ATS media for the benefit of any interested reader(s).

files.abovetopsecret.com/files/519b60564e18e053.pdf

Now, just a question...

They talked about concerns of Aluminium ions as a side effect caused by corrosion, as the study used an Aluminium electrode.

quoting the fulltext a bit, the bolded area says that stainless steel electrodes are available too, but used only for mass scale applications.

Are the electrodes of the NanoKnife machine made of Aluminium, or are they made of stainless steel?


The model of DNA damage by PEF has certain limitations. Although we showed a correlation between DNA retarding in gel electrophoreses and florescence signal decrease with various parameters of the applied PEF, an additional effect of pulse application – electrode material release – is still to be investigated. Currently, two types of electrodes are used for electroporation applications. Aluminum electrodes, as used in this study and stainless steel electrodes, which are popular in large scale PEF systems for food treatment. Studies on PEF in the food industry and cell electro-transfection revealed that electrode material is released to the electrolyte solutions due to the application of high voltage pulses (47, 48). The nature of DNA-metal binding has been recently reviewed in the literature (49, 50). Moreover, Mustak (2002) investigated the impact of various metals on DNA conformation changes in relevance to neurological disorders (51). Specifically, it was shown that Al3+ and Fe2+ ions not only bind to DNA, but also induce confirmation changes in the DNA molecule, including DNA nicking (51). Furthermore, additional works showed that aluminum and iron ions cause DNA damage and topology changes (52-57). Hence, future studies should address a possibility that DNA damage, in addition to applied electric fields, is caused by released electrode materials.



posted on Jul, 20 2010 @ 04:50 AM
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reply to post by jjjtir
 


Jjjtir.....

Before I draft a more complete answer, may I enquire as to why you are asking about the elctrode material?

Do you have something else "on your mind" when you ask this question?

Please don't think for a moment this is a "set up" question. It's just that Rubinsky is pushing into areas in a different manner & I'm busy trying to "process" exactly what he's doing & why.

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not



posted on Jul, 20 2010 @ 04:19 PM
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ATS Team:

Here is an interesting new article about a mann that has been treated with the NanoKnife.

www.gainesvilletimes.com...

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not



posted on Jul, 22 2010 @ 04:42 PM
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ATS Team:

Here is a brief article about 1 of the people involved in the development of IRE technology:

me.berkeley.edu...

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not



posted on Jul, 22 2010 @ 06:23 PM
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ATS Team:

Here is another link & video pertaining to NanoKnife.


New Cancer Treatment with Promising Results



Dr. Rafael Davalos , a bioengineering professor at Virginia Tech is working with his former Ph.D. adviser, Dr. Boris Rubinsky, of UC-Berkeley doing new cancer research to develop a minimally invasive cancer treatment using short electrical pulses targeting only the cancer cells. Already, this procedure has cured cancer in livers of male Sprague-Daley laboratory rats without using any drugs.

Their work with this potentially new cancer cure began with cell cultures in test tubes and progressed to rats, then mice. Dr. Rubinsky reported doing tests on pigs in early 2007. In 2008, trials with human prostate cancer will begin. If those trials are successful, they will try to cure cancer of other types in humans.
New Cancer Cure

This new cancer treatment uses irreversible electroporation (IRE) to kill cancer cells by electrocuting them. Healthy cells nearby are not harmed. As part of the procedure, the cancer cells are monitored using electrical impedance tomography to be sure no cancer cells are missed.

Cells are usually impermeable, but these electric micropulses open holes in the cell's membranes in a matter or seconds. Some of these holes remain open and the cell cannot repair them. This is the key and what kills the cancer cells as the contents drain out.

Dr. Davalos and Dr. Rubinsky have been able to treat different types of cancerous tissues in the laboratory. They treat an area while they watch the progress using tomography. Then they move the needles and repeat the procedure as necessary. The treatment takes only about one minute per affected area. Since the pulses are very short, the cells do not heat up. The procedure is relatively simple and inexpensive and can be done in any hospital.

This procedure avoids a key problem with traditional cancer treatments where the doctor cannot tell if the cancer cells are dead until about a week after the treatment. Some cancer cells can be missed if the oncologist is not aggressive enough, yet if they are too aggressive, surrounding healthy tissue may be damaged. Using IRE allows immediate feedback, enabling the doctor to watch how successful the treatment is while it is being performed.

Dr. Douglas Scherr, the clinical director of urologic oncology at the Weill Medical School of Cornell University believes that this treatment of "irreversible electroporation" could be effective in the treatment of the types of cancers where the tumors can be easily imaged, such as kidney cancer, breast cancer or brain cancer. Research is being conducted at Weill Medical School to more accurately image the cancer, which should result in even more accurate location of the tumor.

www.usedphysicsbooks.com...


Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not


[edit on 22-7-2010 by Maybe...maybe not]



posted on Jul, 23 2010 @ 04:21 AM
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ATS Team:

Here's an article about the NanoKnife being used at LSU Health Sciences Center, Shreveport.


"Anna Qualls hopes a new tumor-killing technology will free her from pain she's suffered for three years."

"On Thursday, Dr. Horacio D'Agostino zapped a tumor near Qualls' bowel with quick bursts of electricity using a NanoKnife. The trademarked equipment was made available to LSU Health Sciences Center-Shreveport and about 10 other health care institutions by manufacturer AngioDynamics. LSUHSC-S is the only hospital in Louisiana with the machine."

"Qualls, 58, of Rayville, is the second patient in Louisiana to undergo the procedure. She had conventional surgery for colon cancer in 2008. After the cancer reappeared in a difficult-to-treat spot, her doctors looked for other options"

www.shreveporttimes.com...


Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not



posted on Jul, 25 2010 @ 03:27 PM
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ATS Team:

Here is an interesting article related to the current technique of utilising "reversible" electroporation (i.e. not irreversible electroporation as per the NanoKnife) to enhance the delivery of chemotherapy drugs.

www.hindawi.com...

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not

[edit on 25-7-2010 by Maybe...maybe not]



posted on Jul, 25 2010 @ 03:37 PM
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ATS Team:

This article looks at the ability to image immediate changes in tumours caused by the NanoKnife via MRI imaging.

I have already seen such changes demonstrated very quickly via CT & ultrasound imaging.

It may be the MRI offers additional information, albeit the constraints surrounding the MRI imaging environment could provide some practical obstacles.

radiology.rsna.org...

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not



posted on Jul, 30 2010 @ 04:30 AM
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ATS Team:

Here’s another interesting journal article about the intracranial application of Nonthermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) technology:


Intracranial Nonthermal Irreversible Electroporation: In Vivo Analysis.

Abstract

Nonthermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is a new minimally invasive technique to treat cancer. It is unique because of its nonthermal mechanism of tumor ablation. Intracranial NTIRE procedures involve placing electrodes into the targeted area of the brain and delivering a series of short but intense electric pulses. The electric pulses induce irreversible structural changes in cell membranes, leading to cell death.

Intracranial Nonthermal Irreversible Electroporation: In Vivo Analysis.


Kind regards
Maybe…maybe not



posted on Jul, 30 2010 @ 04:43 AM
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Let's see... How does the cost of a Nano-Knife treatment compare to, say, the cost of throwing a handful of painkillers at a cancer patient?

Hm. Which option do you think will be most readily provided under Nationalized Heathcare?


— Doc Velocity



posted on Jul, 30 2010 @ 06:14 AM
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Originally posted by Doc Velocity
Let's see... How does the cost of a Nano-Knife treatment compare to, say, the cost of throwing a handful of painkillers at a cancer patient?
Hm. Which option do you think will be most readily provided under Nationalized Heathcare?


Doc Velocity.....

Why do you think it is less expensive not to cure someone?

Regards
Maybe...maybe not





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