Anonymous Browsing / Posting (Information leaking)

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posted on Mar, 1 2010 @ 12:05 AM
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Does anyone have any input as to the effectiveness of any of these anonymous browsing services or any others?

Or other methods of keeping trackers at bay?

anonymouse.org...

www.the-cloak.com...

www.proxybrowsing.com...

I suppose that is what wikileaks is all about.

http://__._/

[edit on 1-3-2010 by In nothing we trust]




posted on Mar, 1 2010 @ 12:21 AM
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wooo, where you get that avatar,meaning,is that book,episode REAL????



posted on Mar, 1 2010 @ 12:26 AM
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Originally posted by StaceyWilson
wooo, where you get that avatar,meaning,is that book,episode REAL????


Title: Thirty Seconds Over New York
Author: Robert Buchard
Publisher: Belmont Tower Books
Year of Publication: 1970
Cover Artist: Unknown



--------------

Get Smart! Epispde 52
www.abovetopsecret.com...




[edit on 1-3-2010 by In nothing we trust]



posted on Mar, 1 2010 @ 12:31 AM
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reply to post by In nothing we trust
 


They only hide your IP address, and are only as effective as you want them to be.



posted on Mar, 1 2010 @ 12:41 AM
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Those are very misleading. While they could hide you from some admins on forums and wikipedia if someone really wanted to find you and you were using a proxy they could.
Those porxy sites and programs all have a disclaimer.


Anonymous
Disclaimer of Warranties
This service is provided as-is, and Anonymouse disclaims all warranties of any kind. Anonymouse gives no warranty that this service will be uninterrupted, secure or free of errors.

The cloak
In accordance with our abuse policy described below, we reserve the right to turn over the IP addresses of people who abuse our system either to the appropriate legal authorities, or to those against whom abuse has been perpetrated. Use of this service constitutes acceptance of the terms of our abuse policy.


Those "anonymous" sites do keep server logs and you are no more safe using them then you are your regular IP address.



posted on Mar, 1 2010 @ 12:47 AM
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Originally posted by zaiger
Those "anonymous" sites do keep server logs and you are no more safe using them then you are your regular IP address.


Would it be possible to hijack or tap into someone elses IP address?

Where does the IP address originate (At the modem or at another switching box from the internet provider) ?

Is it possible to scramble the IP address at it's origin?

[edit on 1-3-2010 by In nothing we trust]



posted on Mar, 1 2010 @ 01:19 AM
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reply to post by In nothing we trust
 


Good questions. The easiest way to "hijack" a network address is to roam areas looking for an open wireless lan connection. Chances are you can find a connection on somebody's home network. The process of scrambling an ip address or "spoofing" as it is sometimes referred to is available to nonspecialists through the use of commonly available hacker tools. Nothing on the network is truly safe, but taking any precautions at all significantly reduces your exposure to amateurs and most crooks. IT Professionals in systems or network admin positions have access to their internal network data and use it constantly in their jobs, so these capabilities are available commonly to corporations and governments of all size. If the data spooks are looking for you I have no suggestions unless you can go swiftly and completely "dark" off-grid leaving no trace of activity on any network.

gj

[edit on 1-3-2010 by ganjoa]



posted on Mar, 1 2010 @ 01:26 AM
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reply to post by In nothing we trust
 


Not really. The best you could get is a dynamic IP but even that is not "anonymous" nothing really is except for using a cyber cafe or public library. But even those places are watching.
What exactly are you trying to do?
All that an anonymous proxy does is make it so that law enforcement has to get one more subpoena to get your IP address.



posted on Mar, 1 2010 @ 01:26 AM
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Originally posted by ganjoa

If the data spooks are looking for you I have no suggestions unless you can go swiftly and completely "dark" off-grid leaving no trace of activity on any network.


One would have to start with a fresh computer yes?

Which operating system would be the best for such an endevor?



posted on Mar, 1 2010 @ 01:33 AM
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reply to post by In nothing we trust
 


One without a microsoft logo or a piece of fruit.... preferrably a penguin. Slackware linux - go have a look at it but if you're not too computer oriented then it might be a tad tricky.

Linux has many 'entry points' but also much more ways to monitor those entrances.
Windows has lots of 'entry points' and not many ways to monitor them. And NSA crypto backdoors...

[edit on 1/3/10 by GhostR1der]



posted on Mar, 1 2010 @ 01:37 AM
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Originally posted by zaiger

What exactly are you trying to do?


Maybe I'm doing nothing?




The best you could get is a dynamic IP but even that is not "anonymous" nothing really is except for using a cyber cafe or public library. But even those places are watching.


I'm unfamiliar with how a dynamic IP is different than a static IP.

What about wifi?

I expect most cyber cafe's or public librarys have video surveilence. Therefore a disguise would be in order. Most librarys have walk up stations for visitors instead of patrons.



All that an anonymous proxy does is make it so that law enforcement has to get one more subpoena to get your IP address.


Unless the proxy is outside of the country yes?


[edit on 1-3-2010 by In nothing we trust]



posted on Mar, 1 2010 @ 01:47 AM
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reply to post by In nothing we trust
 


Oh I'm sorry my explanation didn't mesh. It depends upon who is looking for your internet connection and location. If the alphabet soup agency, law enforcement or military "data spooks" are after you there will literally be no way for you to ever use a computer again without risk. If your concerns are more manageable, then you might consider this: trash all your online accounts, eliminate and forget about all your existing online content, move away, obtain an anonymous debit card you can use for online charging, get a new internet connection and internet provider, get a new anonymous proxy service, setup new internet accounts with completely different usernames, stay away from whatever sites you used to frequent - and hope you don't ever trigger whatever put them onto you in the first place.

The single biggest thing you can do to protect yourself is watch your content and stay below the radar - minimize your profile if you are that concerned or have a truly endangering situation. On the other hand, if you're just a little paranoid like most folks, get a good proxy service and some super-duper-software to protect your system and be confident that you're probably protected from better than 95% of intrusions from those folks that don't have that access mentioned earlier.

gj



posted on Mar, 1 2010 @ 01:54 AM
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reply to post by In nothing we trust
 




What about wifi?

Wifi does not change anything, it is just like being plugged into the router but there is no wires, hence wireless.



Unless it the proxy is outside of the country yes?

Yes and no, here in the US we are protected by the laws law enforcement has to follow. In other countries the may have no problem just handing your IP addres over, that is why they all have disclaimers saying not to do anything illegal and they will not protect you if you do.

What are you trying to do get info or upload info?



posted on Mar, 1 2010 @ 01:58 AM
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I use ixquick or I guess its called startpage now, because they don't record your IP address and if you click on the proxy button you can enter anysite through them.



posted on Mar, 1 2010 @ 02:03 AM
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reply to post by ganjoa
 


Dynamic or static IP won't help with data spooks, but does provide a bit of a barrier to commercial intruders - LEO's can subpoena - and backbone network admins don't even need permission to resolve these to actual locations. WiFi can be good for short burst communications in highly populated areas with lots of hotspots - mall foodcourts, urban business centers (NYC). But again if you are actively being sought, they'll trace back from your online user accounts or email portal to get your connection address so change locations often.

Hope this helps!

gj



posted on Mar, 1 2010 @ 07:55 AM
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Originally posted by zaiger
Yes and no, here in the US we are protected by the laws law enforcement has to follow.
Only problem is some of those alphabet soup agencies haven't been known to follow the law that closely!
Eh?

What with the Patriot Act, I guess they don't even have to technically break the law even.



posted on Mar, 1 2010 @ 09:37 AM
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Originally posted by GhostR1der
reply to post by In nothing we trust
 


One without a microsoft logo or a piece of fruit.... preferrably a penguin. Slackware linux - go have a look at it but if you're not too computer oriented then it might be a tad tricky.

Linux has many 'entry points' but also much more ways to monitor those entrances.
Windows has lots of 'entry points' and not many ways to monitor them. And NSA crypto backdoors...

[edit on 1/3/10 by GhostR1der]


Absolutely true, In nothing we trust...I run Fedora myself. I would suggest anyone wanting to delve into the world of Linux to try Ubuntu first, it works right out of the box, so to speak, and will get one used to using Linux. Want to test your security, and see what others actually see when you go to their website? Here is a url for an online security test. It is completely safe, and will not load any malware into your Windows PC.

Online Browser Security and Privacy Scanners

Browse Linux Operating Systems



posted on Mar, 1 2010 @ 10:07 AM
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Unless you know what you are doing you are pretty stuffed.

There are levels of caution you take the closer you get to someone who does know what they are doing.

Even playing with a script kiddie can get you into plenty of trouble (usernames, sites visited, email addresses, passwords, etc) if you go in unarmed.

Best bet I'd say is either leave it alone or go study some Blackhat techniques, and study them well.

Do you even know what "goto 20" means?

-m0r



posted on Mar, 1 2010 @ 05:09 PM
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Originally posted by m0r1arty

There are levels of caution you take the closer you get to someone who does know what they are doing.

Best bet I'd say is either leave it alone or go study some Blackhat techniques, and study them well.

Do you even know what "goto 20" means?


I'm afraid I don't know what "goto 20" means.

Would you care to enlighten me?



posted on Mar, 1 2010 @ 05:35 PM
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I believe that you just want people to think that you are on to something. I do not believe that you realy are going to do anything that you really have to worry about. I think that you just want people to think that you doing something "importiant" and "secret". I think you are the kind of guy that would sit in starbucks with your laptop wearing a hat and glasses, while saying thing like "omg they are on to me" and other things to draw attention to yourself and then try to cover your screen when people walk by. You want to be seen as a "hacker type" and it is probably your wet dream to be chased by the NSA CIA and FBI but untill then you can only pretend in cyber cafes and ATS. and goto 20 is real basic.





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