Is Baseball a Masonic Sport?

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posted on Feb, 24 2010 @ 08:07 AM
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Baseball fields...


always remind me of the masonic square and compass...



which is why I googled "baseball masonic?" I found this:

Masonic Origins of Baseball

Excerpts:


The baseball stars are a who's who of famed Freemasons: Grover Alexander, Ty Cobb, Carl Hubbell, Branch Rickey, Honus Wagner, and Cy Young, to name a few. It is no mystery that some leaders of their time would be Masons. But what of the question, were the initial symbolic foundations of baseball Masonic?



Abner Doubleday (June 26, 1819 – January 26, 1893) is often, folklorically, said to be one of the two "Fathers" of American baseball. Allegedly Doubleday played the first game at Cooperstown, New York in 1839, and that's the reason the Baseball Hall of Fame is located there, so the story goes.



Was Abner Doubleday a Freemason? There seems little proof of that. Still, the synchromystic underpinnings of Abner Doubleday's life, from that first shot at Fort Sumter to the President of the Theosophical Society to his final resting place at Arlington National Cemetery with an obelisk as his tombstone (Plot: Section 1, Grave 61), should not be understated.



Most baseball historians, however, note that the links between Alexander Joy Cartwright, Jr. and the origins of American baseball are much more secure. I also would say that there is no doubt as to Cartwright's heavy Masonic involvements.

Aside from his duties at the Honolulu Fire Department, Alexander became involved with many other aspects of the city through his involvement with Freemasonry. In 1859, for example, Queen Emma and King Kamehameha IV founded Queen's Hospital. As part of its customs and traditions, cornerstone ceremonies were held for the construction of new buildings. The first public Masonic ceremony on the islands was at the laying of the hospital cornerstone in 1860.


(Read more at the Source linked)

Thoughts?

[edit on 24-2-2010 by Skyfloating]




posted on Feb, 24 2010 @ 08:19 AM
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That compass and square with the "g". I have a photo book of the Harvard Sumerian cylinder seal collection and that compass square with G is clearly present in some of those seals. The G certainly is for Gilgamesh otherwise Nirod. The G is probably the oldest of all the alphebet and hasnt changed in over 5000 years. The star at top is also in common use there.

I dont know if the Summerians played baseball however.


It may be interesting to consider that we play baseball and even some other sports much the same way the Maya played their symbolic "solar" ball games, without as much knowlege of what it was we may be doing than they had.

[edit on 24-2-2010 by Logarock]



posted on Feb, 24 2010 @ 08:46 AM
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reply to post by Logarock
 


Could you please supply photos of this cylinder seal you speak of? It would really tie up a few loose ends on an idea I've been running with for quite some time now.



posted on Feb, 24 2010 @ 08:57 AM
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I would say the circumstantial evidence points to a yes. Clever.

I quite like their symbol. very elegant. I wonder what it would take to join up into their organization. I know you need some sort of religion, be it christianity or even druidic..just some belief in a higher power, not sure how agnostics fit into that picture, but I know they tend to help each other out once your in their circle.



posted on Feb, 24 2010 @ 09:17 AM
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What else comes to mind is 1st Base, 2nd Base 3rd Base corresponding to the 3 Degrees of regular Freemasonry, after which you become a Master Mason.



posted on Feb, 24 2010 @ 09:29 AM
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reply to post by SaturnFX
 


It takes you being 21 years of age, believing in a higher power, and asking a Mason to petition. It's quite simple really. I myself am so taken and accepted and must say i am very happy with the decision to have joined.



posted on Feb, 24 2010 @ 09:38 AM
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Originally posted by Skyfloating
What else comes to mind is 1st Base, 2nd Base 3rd Base corresponding to the 3 Degrees of regular Freemasonry, after which you become a Master Mason.


Would a home run be the much-discussed higher degree then?

Nice thread as usual Sky, very interesting and thought provoking.



posted on Feb, 24 2010 @ 09:43 AM
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American baseball came from the English game Rounders, a game most kids played at school here in the uk. It was seen as a game all kids, girls and boys sporty and non sporty could all play together.

you are only allowed one hand on the bat and the pitch must be under arm. When you hit the ball you aim to get past the 3 bases as in baseball, you score a "rounder by hitting the ball and making it around all 3 bases, while you class mates chant "rounder, rounder, rounder"

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Feb, 24 2010 @ 09:56 AM
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Although the roots of baseball are English, similar games have also been played in other parts of the world. Oina is a Romanian ball sport, similar in some ways to baseball. Russia had a bat and ball game called Lapta since the 14th century. Germans played a game called Schlagball, which was similar to rounders.

A "bowler" threw a ball to a "striker," who hit it with a club and then tried to run around a circuit of bases without getting hit with the ball by a defender. Americans played a version of the English game rounders in the early 1800s which they called "Town Ball".
*

I lookee up these sports and interestingly, none of these predecessors appear to have the square/compass-like shape of the Baseball field.

[edit on 24-2-2010 by Skyfloating]



posted on Feb, 24 2010 @ 10:00 AM
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Star and a flag for sheer originality. I wish I had come up with this one. Kudos to you for taking this to a whole new, ahaha, playing field.



posted on Feb, 24 2010 @ 10:03 AM
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Only Skyfloating.
God what a mind you must have. I actually think you have soimething here. I don't want to go into it right now but there are a few other angles to this as well . Get it.


Not a big Dodger fan. But the year Gibson went storybook with his bases loaded WS homer.
When ever the phone rang at my house I would answer by saying,"
Dodger stadium Kurt Gibson". Yes, He is a mason.

[edit on 24-2-2010 by randyvs]



posted on Feb, 24 2010 @ 10:10 AM
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I'd never before considered this, but this must be the reason why I distrust that game.



posted on Feb, 24 2010 @ 10:22 AM
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I'm sure that baseball and many other pro sports for that matter have ties to secret societies. It would explain all the money that is put into it, and perhaps even some over the owners/GMs.

But its quite interesting that the field baseball (America's pastime) is played on has so many numbers and "schematics" relating to free masons.



posted on Feb, 24 2010 @ 11:07 AM
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Originally posted by AugustusMasonicus

Would a home run be the much-discussed higher degree then?



Yes, home-run would be the much disguised fourth-degree



posted on Feb, 24 2010 @ 11:28 AM
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Originally posted by kyle43
I'm sure that baseball and many other pro sports for that matter have ties to secret societies.



You can even visit the actual birthplace of modern soccer—the Freemasons Tavern in London. It was here in 1863 that the Football Association was founded, but we’re getting ahead of ourselves.


History of Soccer



posted on Feb, 24 2010 @ 11:52 AM
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Originally posted by randyvs
I don't want to go into it right now but there are a few other angles to this as well .


Feel free to wildly speculate.


Originally posted by CharlieintheTrees
I distrust that game.


How so?


[edit on 24-2-2010 by Skyfloating]



posted on Feb, 24 2010 @ 12:02 PM
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reply to post by Skyfloating
 


Thats interesting , didnt know the fact Football and the modern game and The organisation The F.A was founded at The Freemasons Tavern.

Thanks, now thats given me more ideas on something.



posted on Feb, 24 2010 @ 01:15 PM
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reply to post by Logarock
 


Yes, please try to get those photos online.



posted on Feb, 24 2010 @ 01:44 PM
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I knew it..... Freakin Yankees!!!!!

2 line post.



posted on Feb, 24 2010 @ 01:58 PM
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Take me out to the ball game (take me...)
take me out with the crowd (take me to be with a group)
Buy me some peanuts and crackerjack
I don't care if I ever get back (sold soul?)
For it's root root root for the home team (Roots of Masonry? Masons as home team?)
If they don't win it's a shame (self explanatory)
For it's one, two, three strikes you're out (Three degrees and you're "out with the crowd"?)
At the old ball game.

Yup. Anything with the number 3, or 33 or 32 or... or involving any geometric shape or angles or degrees, is Masonic.

Now naturally, I'm kidding. I think a lot of things originating in the 19th and early 20th centuries likely had some Masons involved with their creation, primarily due to so many men being involved with Masonry during that era.

Freemasonry and Curling

Freemasonry and Golf

The challenge might be, come up with something that someone somewhere hasn't tied into Freemasonry.





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