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ICBM PAL code mess

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posted on May, 29 2004 @ 09:40 PM
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Here is something that just blows my mind, apparantly during the height of the cold war the PAL system was installed on our Minuteman missiles to prevent unauthorized launch. In our intense fear of russian agression SAC made the decision to set all the launch codes to 'OOOOOOOO' to faciliate launch in the event of a strike against the United States.

article here => www.cdi.org...

I thought it was bad reading about the various accidents of nuclear scientists, but this takes the cake. Its suprising that someone didnt just flip out one day and launch a minuteman at whatever they wanted. More and more it seems our entire nuclear program, from the scientists doing the research to the systems governing our actual weapons systems are completely screwed up and in dire need of a overhaul before the unthinkable happens.




posted on Jun, 13 2004 @ 12:26 AM
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Be careful what you belive from an (obviosuly disgruntled) person who has had no operational experience in who nows how many years.

First of all, the "unlock" codes are 6 digits. Second NO ONE (and I mean absolutely no one, not even the president) will ever know the entire code until the decision to launch. (All nuclear-related codes are split knowledge to the highest levels).

What Mr. Blair is probably talking about (although it was written in extremely poor detail) is the launch code that must match from the launch control center to the missile. What this code is is pretty much moot, as it is stored in it's entirety in a mechanical code unit in the capsule. It is however encrypted/decrypted, so all 0's would not be transmited as all 0's and therefore would be just as secure (agianst unauthorized launch from someone other than the capsule) as anything else.

If Mr. Blair actually ever new the entire unlock code, I can assure you he would have spent some quality time in Ft. Leavenworth.



posted on Jun, 13 2004 @ 12:36 AM
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I wonder how they do it now. Anyone know?

It used to be two officers would have two seperate keys to two seperate safe where the codes were stored, then two other officers would have special keys to arm the weapons and launch them.

They came out with many many a film in th e80s about this. War Games being the most popular and probably the most unbelievable. That we would rely on a machine to launch the nukes. Back then it was hard to believe, in the days of the Commodore Vic 20. Yeah I'm seasoned. But today is it so hard to believe that we rely on a computer to do this deed?

Anyone know the protocol for launching nukes today? I know , what nukes? There are no nukes. Right.


Nutzo



posted on Jun, 13 2004 @ 10:31 AM
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In a REACT Minuteman system there is 1 keyed Launch panel with 3 co-operative launch switches. All must be turned simultaneously. At this time a code (stored mechanically in the panel) is encrypted and sent to all missiles.

It takes a minimum of 2 Launch votes (from two seperate capsules) to launch a missile, with some safeguards built in for ensured launch in hostile conditions (airborn launch control centers, single launch vote timers, etc.). If any 1 capsule attempts an unathroized launch and of the other capsules in it's sqaudron (5 other capsules) can also inhibit the launch.

Note - The combat crew always has access to the complete launch code in the capsule. It is an enable code that they are missing.



posted on Jun, 15 2004 @ 10:43 AM
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Originally posted by Starwars50
In a REACT Minuteman system there is 1 keyed Launch panel with 3 co-operative launch switches. All must be turned simultaneously. At this time a code (stored mechanically in the panel) is encrypted and sent to all missiles.

It takes a minimum of 2 Launch votes (from two seperate capsules) to launch a missile, with some safeguards built in for ensured launch in hostile conditions (airborn launch control centers, single launch vote timers, etc.). If any 1 capsule attempts an unathroized launch and of the other capsules in it's sqaudron (5 other capsules) can also inhibit the launch.

Note - The combat crew always has access to the complete launch code in the capsule. It is an enable code that they are missing.


That's right! but there is more. The system rquires three seprate codes to achieve a launch. The first one is the Access code. The Access Code is a security code that the launch commander uses to gain Access to the launch control system. Once the crew has put this in they can up load data and send commands to the ICBM. The second code is the arming code that is used to arm the warhead and activate all of the missile's electronics. The last code is the Launch code, this code is used to actually release the missile.

I think the "0000" you refered to might be the access code. The other two codes are sealed inside of the Football also called the Doomsday breifcase that travels with the US President whereever he goes."

Tim
ATS Director of Counter-Ignorance



posted on Jun, 15 2004 @ 01:09 PM
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Originally posted by ghost
That's right! but there is more. The system rquires three seprate codes to achieve a launch. The first one is the Access code. The Access Code is a security code that the launch commander uses to gain Access to the launch control system. Once the crew has put this in they can up load data and send commands to the ICBM. The second code is the arming code that is used to arm the warhead and activate all of the missile's electronics. The last code is the Launch code, this code is used to actually release the missile.



This is not quite right. An ICBM needs only 2 codes to launch, the first being an enable code (6 digits, which can be either selective or one "SIOP Enanble" common to all US nuclear forces), and a launch code. In order to launch immediately 2 launch codes are needed from 2 seperate capsules.

It is true that if a maintinance team wants to work on an ICBM (on site), they need an 'access code', but that is not required for any operation from a Launch control center (Capsule). This is true for the Peacekeeper as well.



posted on Jun, 15 2004 @ 01:22 PM
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Originally posted by Starwars50

Originally posted by ghost
That's right! but there is more. The system rquires three seprate codes to achieve a launch. The first one is the Access code. The Access Code is a security code that the launch commander uses to gain Access to the launch control system. Once the crew has put this in they can up load data and send commands to the ICBM. The second code is the arming code that is used to arm the warhead and activate all of the missile's electronics. The last code is the Launch code, this code is used to actually release the missile.



This is not quite right. An ICBM needs only 2 codes to launch, the first being an enable code (6 digits, which can be either selective or one "SIOP Enanble" common to all US nuclear forces), and a launch code. In order to launch immediately 2 launch codes are needed from 2 seperate capsules.

It is true that if a maintinance team wants to work on an ICBM (on site), they need an 'access code', but that is not required for any operation from a Launch control center (Capsule). This is true for the Peacekeeper as well.


Thanks for pointing out the mistake. I was thinking of the arming code for the bombs, like the B-61 and B-83 Nuclear Bombs, which is also a single code. Sorry for the confusion. Nukes were never my speciality.

Tim
ATS Director of Counter-Ignorance



posted on Jun, 15 2004 @ 03:59 PM
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Thanks for pointing out the mistake. I was thinking of the arming code for the bombs, like the B-61 and B-83 Nuclear Bombs, which is also a single code. Sorry for the confusion. Nukes were never my speciality.



No problem ... that's the point of this forum ...



posted on Jun, 23 2004 @ 02:01 PM
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they still use two seperate keys i think



posted on Jun, 23 2004 @ 07:33 PM
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Originally posted by WestPoint23
they still use two seperate keys i think


Nope. 1 Key, 1 Launch code (per capsule) - but 3 other "co-operative launch switches" must be turned similtaneously to actually transmit the launch code.

As I said earilier, to launch immediately 2 codes (from 2 seperate capsules) are needed.



posted on Sep, 16 2009 @ 05:03 AM
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Could someone tell me if the russians have safe nuclear launch codes for there nuclear suberines.What would happen if teorrists took control of a russian suberine or a russian suberine crew turned rouge.Can the russian nuclear weapons be fired with out nuclear launch codes.Are thoses codes on the russian suberines or do they get the codes from the kremlin in emergency situations.



posted on Sep, 16 2009 @ 02:04 PM
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reply to post by GORGANTHIUM
 


Interesting that you should bring that up. In the book Red Star Rogue, it's speculated that the Soviet missile sub lost near Hawaii in the 1960s was attempting to launch a missile on Pearl Harbor, pretending to be a Chinese submarine. The evidence points to a secret plot by the KGB and Kremlin, but was thwarted by the PAL devices given to the Soviets by the United States. The US and Soviets had worked out an agreement that all missiles would have a PAL device, and the US provided them to the Soviets, and showed them how to reprogram them (interesting to see what ELSE was in them). When the KGB officers that were placed on the sub at the last minute the PAL device caused the missile to self destruct instead of launching, fatally damaging the submarine, and dooming the crew.



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