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Calling Muslim Women: Let's Hear From You

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posted on Feb, 12 2010 @ 08:35 PM
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Hello ATS,

For the last few days I've noticed a lot of threads concerning Islam and women. Some threads report horrific "honor killings" or other abuse suffered by women at the hands of Islamic religious extremists. Other threads discuss whether the Koran actually calls for the subjucation of women or not. Yet almost all of these threads have missed a very vital question: What do the Muslim WOMEN say about life in the Middle East?

Here is your chance to clear up any misperceptions you believe might be in place in the Western world. Here is your chance to share with us your experiences (positive or negative) in the Middle East, the West, or anyplace in between. Here is your chance to open a meaningful dialogue with those of us who may not be familiar with your religion or your culture. And here is your chance to ask questions in return.

I realize a lot of people feel very strongly about this topic; I understand how emotions can be triggered when discussing such issues. However, I hope we can put aside the bickering, acrimony, and slandering I've seen in other threads.

I look forward to learning from you.





posted on Feb, 12 2010 @ 08:42 PM
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Ithought it might be noteworthy to give you some background on my current perspective of women in Islam.

I live in the US. Not surprisingly, most of the MSM reports on Islam that we hear are sensational, and typically involve violence against women. The reports usually imply this violence is religiously sanctioned.

For myself, the stereotypical "image" of a woman in the Middle East is that of a woman continually living in fear. She's made to wear a burqa for fear of reprisals, must obey the men in her life without question, and has little legal or political recourse.

I know this is an ignorant viewpoint. I know the MSM has an agenda when reporting stories about Muslims. And I feel in my heart that the majority of Muslim men cannot possibly behave in such a fashion, or that the majority of Muslim women would so willingly allow it to continue.

I look forward to learning from you all.



posted on Feb, 14 2010 @ 08:10 AM
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And no comments.....

Bump because I would really like to hear from many on this issue.

(Men, you're welcome to share, too)



posted on Feb, 14 2010 @ 08:14 AM
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The silence is deafening and speaks volumes.



posted on Feb, 14 2010 @ 09:04 AM
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IMHO the reason that the MSM paints the muslim faith in such a dark light is because....

1) Muslims seem to be wise to the bankers and other monitary tricks.

2) If the Western women started to stay home and focus on raising families their children might actually learn to think and question and this would be very bad for the elites.





[edit on 14-2-2010 by ..5..]



posted on Feb, 14 2010 @ 01:33 PM
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If the Western women started to stay home and focus on raising families their children might actually learn to think and question and this would be very bad for the elites.
reply to post by ..5..
 


That's a very interesting idea, and one to think about.

Another idea: the current American lifestyle of materialism pretty much requires two people to work. If we went to one main provider, there'd be a lot less purchases of frivolous items made.....and who would that hurt? Said manufacturers?



posted on Feb, 14 2010 @ 01:42 PM
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Originally posted by DJW001
The silence is deafening and speaks volumes.


Maybe Muslim women arn't looking on the internet at conspiracy sites? There are fewer women on this site in general anyway.
If there are any muslim ladies on ATS, maybe they don't feel they have to justify their beliefs to someone who clearly has an issue with them.

Replace Muslim with the word "Black" or "Jewish" and I thnk you'll see what I mean.

[edit on 14-2-2010 by woodwardjnr]

[edit on 14-2-2010 by woodwardjnr]



posted on Feb, 14 2010 @ 01:52 PM
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maybe they don't feel they have to justify their beliefs to someone who clearly has an issue with them.
reply to post by woodwardjnr
 


I'm sorry, how does it come across that I have an "issue" with Muslim women or their beliefs? I do not. Instead, I have a desire to hear from them and to learn from them. Denying ignorance, and all that. Anyway, please share with me what in my posts led you to believe this, because I don't want that image portrayed and I will correct it.

As for the rest of your post, you are absolutely right. Before assuming that there are no replies for whatever reason, we should bear in mind that not everyone in the world has heard of ATS (shocking, I know, lol) and that it is an English site, perhaps there are multi barriers to communicating.

Anyway, thanks for your post.



posted on Feb, 14 2010 @ 01:53 PM
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I'm not a woman, but I've been to many muslim countries, and know a number of muslim women, so take that as you will.

If you ask me, it isn't so much a matter of religion as it is a matter of education. In places that (or with people who) have good education, I've seen the women are pretty equally treated (and in many cases are the heads of the family!).



posted on Feb, 14 2010 @ 01:57 PM
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reply to post by babloyi
 


thank you for your post. Although I directed this thread towards Muslim women, everyone is welcome to share their experiences.

Would you be willing to give more details? For example, which countries did you visit? Did you have any relationships with women (friendships, working, school, etc), and if so, how did that work? A lot of the anti-Muslim rhetoric goes on and on about how women aren't allowed to be friend with men not in their family. Did you find this true?



posted on Feb, 14 2010 @ 02:11 PM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 


Well, I had to do my GCSE's in Cairo, Egypt, and had several female friends who were muslim. To take it even further, I had several DEVOUT muslim female friends- they wore the hijab, prayed 5 times a day, etc.

I also spent a couple years in Pakistan, and while it is a little behind Egypt, I'd say there wasn't any rampant oppression of females there either.

I visited Saudi Arabia for a few days, so I didn't really get to know anybody there either (female or otherwise). In public the women were usually in a hijab or burqa, but indoors, it was somewhat less so. I'm not sure, but I believe women aren't allowed to drive in Saudi Arabia either.

I personally dislike the idea that so many people take Saudi Arabia as a representative of how Islam treats women.



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