It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

US Navy Seals using dolphins as a weapon?

page: 1
0
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 28 2004 @ 05:25 AM
link   
Well this could sound a little weird but I heard about US navy using trained dolphins as underwater weapons. We all know these animals are very inteligent and human friendly so they could be trained like the dogs. They were used as a guards for the S.E.A.L. commandos to protect them against sharks and aligators (dolphin is very powerfull and dangerous) and they have been even trained to kill people, plant mines (or search for mines) detect various underwater threats using their sonar like the dog smell. I know this could be true because I remeber in Iraq I saw in TV the seal (or something like that) used for mine detection (he was not killed of course just for detection). I think is fascinating, so can some navy expert tell anything more about it?




posted on May, 28 2004 @ 05:34 AM
link   
I found some info on one site


"Ever since Hannibal of Carthage crossed the Alps using elephants, and Alexander the Great rode into battle astride his magnificent steed, Bucephalus, animals have served important roles in warfare.
Today, in the war with Iraq, specially trained dolphins are being used to locating mines in the Khor Abd Allah waterway, Iraq's artery to the Persian Gulf.

"The U.S. Navy has been using marine mammals for more than 30 years. Dolphins are uniquely suited for numerous missions including mine detection, mine location and detecting (enemy) swimmers," Lt. Cmdr. John Bernard, a U.S. Navy spokesman at the Pentagon, told United Press International's Animal Tales. "Marine mammals help save lives using their natural ability."

An unspecified number of bottlenose dolphins are working in the waterways of Iraq where humanitarian aid must pass to get to the Iraqi people.

The British ship, H.M.S. Sir Galahad, docked Friday at the port town of Umm Qasr to distribute several hundred tons of humanitarian aid including food, water and blankets. Its arrival was delayed because of additional mines found in the waterway.

Deputy Coalition Maritime Joint Component Commander, Rear Adm. David Snelson of the Royal Navy, said although many of the mines placed there were from previous conflicts "there is indication that Iraq has tried to lay new mines to delay the coalition forces getting aid into the country," according to Jane's Navy International.

Although land mines can be less than two inches in diameter and made mostly of plastic, mines in waterways are larger, about the size of a small trashcan. They can be tethered by a line or left to float freely.

U.S. Naval Special Clearance Team One, based in San Diego, trains and handles the Navy's marine mammal program, in which dolphins find mines and sea lions patrol waterways for enemy swimmers who might plant explosives on naval vessels.

Some sea lions have been trained to not only detect an enemy swimmer but to push a foot cuff on him that marks him and swim away.

As intelligent as a smart dog and easily trained, dolphins have been used to detect mines or protect Navy divers since the Vietnam War. The dolphins detect the mines, which are made of metal. They are trained to mark the mines with floating buoys. The animals do nothing with the mines; they simply locate them, mark them with a buoy and U.S. Navy divers detonate the mines after the dolphins have been removed from the area.

Dolphins find food and are trained to find mines using "sonar" or, more correctly, bat-like echolocation, which enables them to "see" with their ears by listening for echoes.

According to the Web site SeaWorld.org, dolphins produce a series of directional clicks, each of which lasts from 50 to 128 microseconds. The clicks pass through the melon -- a rounded region of a dolphin's forehead consisting mostly of fats.

"The melon acts as an acoustical lens to focus these sound waves into a beam, which is projected forward into water in front of the animal," SeaWorld.org explains.

"Sound waves travel through water at a speed of about 0.9 mi/sec, which is 4.5 times faster than sound traveling through air. The sound waves bounce off objects in the water and return to the dolphin in the form of an echo."

The sounds are conducted through the lower jaw to the middle ear, inner ear, and then to hearing centers in the brain via the auditory nerve. The brain receives the sound waves in the form of nerve impulses, which relay the messages of sound and enable the dolphin to interpret the sound's meaning, according to SeaWorld Adventure Parks.

Some of the dolphins used by the U.S. Navy and other coalition units also carry a camera attached to their dorsal fin to aid the divers in identifying the type of mine.

Dolphins are altruistic and work cooperatively in hunting for food. Males often assist one another in obtaining a mate, they will support an injured dolphin at the surface so it can breathe and entire pods will put themselves in jeopardy to come to the aid of a mother and her calf, according to the Web site of the Dolphin Research Center in the Florida Keys, Dolphins.org.

Dolphins are adaptable, feeding on available fish and living almost everywhere in the oceans except in the polar seas. They also have a long history of working cooperatively with humans.

In southern Brazil, bottlenose dolphins have been the initiators of fishing cooperative.

Town records indicate since 1847, dolphins have alerted the fishermen of Laguna, Brazil, of "feeding time" by stationing themselves offshore in a line, according to Dolphins.org.

When a dolphin leaves the line, swims to sea, returns, stops and dives, the fishermen know it is time to put out their nets.

"Few fishermen waste their time casting until instructed to do so by the dolphins' actions while the dolphins seem to take advantage of the confusion, which results as the men cast their nets, feeding on their own from the remaining fish," said the Dolphin Research Center.

Though the dolphins are effective mine detectors, organizations such as People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals do not like the idea of dolphins being drafted.

"War is a human endeavor and innocent animals should not be put in harm's way," Stephanie Boyles, wildlife biologist for PETA in Washington, D.C., told UPI's Animal Tales. "Dolphins were meant to live and die in the water and not take plane trips to the Middle East. To them, finding mines is a game and they don't know the consequences if they fail."

Boyles does not question the dolphins and sea lions' treatment by the U.S. Navy, but she fears the dolphins' mine detection work could give the military a false sense of security.

"They don't need to rely on the dolphins. They have other methods to detect mines," Boyles said. "There is also no guarantee or even much likelihood that these animals will save humans and, certainly, our troops deserve the very best in surveillance."

The U.S. Navy has ships that can sweep for mines and helicopters that can detect mines from the air deployed in the Persian Gulf, but it does not reveal the success rate for the mechanical or dolphin mine detection systems.

However, Bill McClain, a retired U.S. Navy Seal, who helped develop the dolphin mine sweeping program in the 1970s, recently told KCRA-TV in Sacramento, Calif.: "The minesweepers are something like 94 percent effective ... dolphins were 99.8 percent effective."

www.applesforhealth.com...



posted on May, 28 2004 @ 05:42 AM
link   
and something more:

"Between 1965 and 1975, several dolphin trainers resigned after the Navy sent five dolphins to Vietnam, ostensibly to perform non-lethal activities. However, Dr. Michael Greenwood, a former military cetacean trainer and neurophysiologist, claims that during the Vietnam War, dolphins were taught to kill enemy swimmers by using hypodermic syringes to inject them with pressurized carbon dioxide. This would cause the humans to literally explode. It is speculated that the deaths of 40 Vietcong divers and two US servicemen were the result of this top-secret program. It is now well-documented that the Soviet Union’s dolphin program—which developed in parallel to the one in the US and ended in the 1990s due to lack of funds—included such “killer dolphins.” Greenwood also said that the Navy trained orcas to deliver explosives, including nuclear warheads, to enemy shores. The US government has denied these allegations."


something about sea lions
"Recently, up to 20 sea lions were deployed to the Persian Gulf during the Iraq war. According to the Navy, both dolphins and sea lions—who are deployed by land, sea or air—are taught to attach a restraining device to the legs of enemy swimmers. “The clamp is connected to a rope and signal buoy that humans with guns would then reel up, presumably pulling up a human on the other end,” an ABC News story reported. A BBC article left more room for the imagination when it reported that sea lions, who can swim as fast as 25 miles per hour, “can even pursue a suspect onto dry land.”

Us Navy says dolphins can plant the mines faster than humans
"During the 1980s, former military dolphin trainers announced that Navy dolphins were capable of planting mines 100 times faster than humans. In 1985, Ken Woodal, a former US Navy SEAL, said that he had worked with three dolphins in Vietnam and that they were “quite effective in attaching light mines to enemy wharves and piers.” The Navy continues to deny allegations that any cetaceans have ever been used to plant mines or bombs."

"In 1987, during the Iran-Iraq War, the US sent five dolphins to the Persian Gulf to protect Navy ships and locate mines in the harbor. At the time, it was reported that Iranian patrol boats machine-gunned every dolphin they saw, fearing the rumors that “American animals” were laying mines and spying with cameras".



posted on May, 28 2004 @ 06:12 AM
link   
Actually, it is a different unit that utilizes dolphins.

The U.S. Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal community has integrated dolphins into their training program, which is currently only being conducted by a specialized division of EOD. They have made breakthrough success in the research and development of this program.



(U)

Underwater Demolition Units/Mobile Inshore Underwater Demolitions Detachment

Scope - To determine whether or not the use of mammals is profitable in the following fields:

Reconnassaince
Underwater Demolition
Minesweeping
Implementation and Deactivation of Mines
Deterring of Combat Swimmers and Divers

Specific information regarding the tactics and methods used by EOD units affiliated with this research remains highly classified...


Mr. M



posted on May, 28 2004 @ 06:15 AM
link   

Originally posted by StarChild
Actually, it is a different unit that utilizes dolphins.
Mr. M


Dang Mr M you beat me again.

Personally I can say that these dolphins are just like any other sailor in the Navy (they even have their own ranks). There are good ones and then there are the lazy ones.

The good ones also happen to be the most playful.



posted on May, 28 2004 @ 06:23 AM
link   


Good one, LT. That is very true, indeed. There are exceptions to the integrity of this program, specifically regarding the reliability of these dolphins when tasked with an assignment.


Mr. M



posted on May, 28 2004 @ 08:08 AM
link   
So no S.E.A.L.s are working with the dolphins?

And what is better for specific missions(like minesweeping or enemy detection) the dolphin or sea lion?



posted on May, 28 2004 @ 08:12 AM
link   
That would probably be OPSEC, I'm afraid.

I'll leave that decision up to Mr M in this case though. He knows faaaar more than I do. In fact, I know nothing about anything to do with the ocean in general!

(I owe you a PM from that other site, too, Mr M).



posted on May, 28 2004 @ 11:52 AM
link   
haha, dolphins carrying syringes filled with co2 to explode vietcong divers? give me a break.

Dolphins have been used in mine removal forever. My brother was a navy diver/EOD and he never worked directly with them but told me of them a lot.



posted on May, 28 2004 @ 02:31 PM
link   
From what I hear, the Dolphins are treated extremely well...except for the whole blowing up thing.



posted on May, 29 2004 @ 12:57 AM
link   

Originally posted by Hard Red
From what I hear, the Dolphins are treated extremely well...except for the whole blowing up thing.


Which is true also. Dolphins are expendable, and in some cases, are utilized for "suicide missions". This (in my opinion) is not a preferred method, for the simple fact of figures. Anyone have any idea how much money it costs the U.S. Government to train 1 of these dolphins???

Try about $300,000,000.00.



Mr. M



posted on May, 29 2004 @ 01:01 AM
link   

Originally posted by longbow
So no S.E.A.L.s are working with the dolphins?

And what is better for specific missions(like minesweeping or enemy detection) the dolphin or sea lion?


SEALs do work with them, but in unison with EOD units. EOD is the primary UIC of operations, while other units may participate in training IAW instructions, there are no other units that have sole control over their own projects. EOD is the primary.

Now, as far as the specific information you requested above regarding mission requirements, etc...refer to my first post on this thread.

"Specific information regarding the tactics and methods used by EOD units affiliated with this research remains highly classified... "


Mr. M



posted on Jun, 23 2004 @ 02:02 PM
link   
they only use them for finding sea mines.



posted on Jun, 25 2004 @ 03:29 AM
link   

Originally posted by WestPoint23
they only use them for finding sea mines.


On the contrary, they also utilize them for attacking/deterring combat swimmers and divers.


Mr. M



posted on Jun, 26 2004 @ 05:11 AM
link   
no they don't they have something called a patrol boat with machine guns for discouraging swimmers



posted on Jun, 26 2004 @ 02:00 PM
link   

Originally posted by WestPoint23
no they don't they have something called a patrol boat with machine guns for discouraging swimmers


I don't know where you are getting your information from, but you have been mislead.

Your title is Westpoint, so I'm assuming that you are one of those "I KNOW EVERYTHING" wannabe officers. Figures...

How about researching your information before you post, buddy. I've worked with SEALs and EOD before, that's how I know. What have you done? Westpoint?



Mr. M



posted on Jun, 26 2004 @ 06:39 PM
link   
You might want to check out Dr. John C. Lily, who pioneered dolphin communication. His work, and the reason he stopped doing it, inspired the movie, Day of the Dolphin. (Essentially he loathed the idea that his research was being used as weaponry.) His work in sensory deprivation with hallucinogenic drugs is really interesting and inspired the movie, Altered States.



posted on Jun, 26 2004 @ 06:47 PM
link   

Originally posted by WestPoint23
no they don't they have something called a patrol boat with machine guns for discouraging swimmers


You are wrong... sorry

My SO's son is an EOD, I have trading cards of the dolphins he trained with. The program is called MK6 (probabbly MK8 by now)
There ARE killer dolphins out there, and nothing happens to the dolphin. They have a cone shaped device loaded with a bullet attached to their nose. They are trained to recognize who is our divers..and who is the bad diver, they will swim up to the bad diver, bump him with the cone, and it discharges the bullet, killing the diver.
Mr M is right. They don't use them just for mine disposal.

Look up MK6 or MK8, you'll see.



posted on Jun, 26 2004 @ 09:46 PM
link   
Guess Echo the Dolphin just wasn't into the cute happy dolphin look.

I wonder is their any selection process when choosing dolphins for this program.

[edit on 6/26/2004 by cyberdude78]



posted on Jul, 1 2004 @ 01:29 AM
link   

Originally posted by cyberdude78
Guess Echo the Dolphin just wasn't into the cute happy dolphin look.

I wonder is their any selection process when choosing dolphins for this program.

[edit on 6/26/2004 by cyberdude78]


The dolphin must be a newborn, & in good health. That's about it. As with any other trainable animal, the subject must be trained from birth to achieve the maximum amount of loyalty, and adeptness in skills.


Mr. M







 
0
<<   2 >>

log in

join