Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

Spray-on liquid glass is about to revolutionize almost everything

page: 1
92
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join
+36 more 
posted on Feb, 2 2010 @ 09:35 AM
link   

Spray-on liquid glass is about to revolutionize almost everything


www.physorg.com

Spray-on liquid glass is transparent, non-toxic, and can protect virtually any surface against almost any damage from hazards such as water, UV radiation, dirt, heat, and bacterial infections. The coating is also flexible and breathable, which makes it suitable for use on an enormous array of products.
(visit the link for the full news article)



Here is the inventors website: Nanopool

-E-


[edit on 2-2-2010 by MysterE]




posted on Feb, 2 2010 @ 09:35 AM
link   

The liquid glass spray (technically termed “SiO2 ultra-thin layering”) consists of almost pure silicon dioxide (silica, the normal compound in glass) extracted from quartz sand. Water or ethanol is added, depending on the type of surface to be coated. There are no additives, and the nano-scale glass coating bonds to the surface because of the quantum forces involved. According to the manufacturers, liquid glass has a long-lasting antibacterial effect because microbes landing on the surface cannot divide or replicate easily.



Wow! this sounds amazing, even revolutionary. Image all of the different applications for storage and preservation. The only thing that has me worried is that it is "almost pure silicon dioxide (silica, the normal compound in glass)". There is a lung disease called Silicosis which

Silicosis is a disabling, nonreversible and sometimes fatal lung disease caused by overexposure to respirable crystalline silica. Silica exposure remains a serious threat to nearly two million US workers. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) reports that each year more than 250 die from silicosis and hundreds more are disabled. There is no cure for the disease.


I'm not sure that this product will cause Silicosis , and it would be a shame if such an invention was toxic.

-E-

www.physorg.com
(visit the link for the full news article)

[edit on 2-2-2010 by MysterE]



posted on Feb, 2 2010 @ 09:46 AM
link   
says in the source that the product is non-toxic so i can't see why it would be. anymore sources on this?? and also what use would this be? good post



posted on Feb, 2 2010 @ 09:51 AM
link   
This does sound extremely promising indeed! I wonder if the coating can be applied to fabrics to prevent colour loss due to sun damage? I was thinking about getting my entire wardrobe ionised to make it rain proof but I think thats a little outside my budget lol



posted on Feb, 2 2010 @ 09:54 AM
link   
reply to post by pangaea
 


I hope it is non-toxic, it sounds like a great invention. I used to work in an industry that invilved silica (which is mainly what this is) and Silicosis was a real danger there. Maybe there is a technique that takes out the toxicity.

As far as uses go

When coated, all surfaces become easy to clean and anti- microbially protected (Winner of the NHS Smart Solutions Award ). Houses, cars, ovens, wedding dress or any other protected surface become stain resistant and can be easily cleaned with water ; no cleaning chemicals are required. Amazingly a 30 second DIY application to a sink unit will last for a year or years, depending on how often it is used. But it does not stop there - the coatings are now also recognised as being suitable for agricultural and in-vivo application. Vines coated with SiO2 don’t suffer from mildew, and coated seeds grow more rapidly without the need for anti-fungal chemicals. This will result in farmers in enjoying massively increased yields


From the producers website linked in the OP

-E-

[edit on 2-2-2010 by MysterE]



posted on Feb, 2 2010 @ 09:56 AM
link   
I'm picturing Goldfinger chick, naked on the bed covered in glass. And a bunch of kids huffing the stuff to get high.
But the applications to buildings around the WTC would have had just to have been hosed off from all the dust. Instead it was quite costly to clean up that debris and stuff.
Cool thread.



posted on Feb, 2 2010 @ 09:58 AM
link   
Amazing! I love nanotechnology, it will revolutionize the world.

From the article:

"But it does not stop there - the coatings are now also recognised as being suitable for agricultural and in-vivo application. Vines coated with SiO2 don’t suffer from mildew, and coated seeds grow more rapidly without the need for anti-fungal chemicals. This will result in farmers in enjoying massively increased yields . Trials for in-vivo applications are subject to a degree of secrecy, but Neil McClelland, the UK Project Manager for Nanopool GmbH, describes the results as “stunning”.
“Items such as stents can be coated, and this will create anti sticking features - catheters , and sutures which are a source of infection, will also cease to be problematic.”

For the sake of our globe, I hope this does revolutionize agriculture.



posted on Feb, 2 2010 @ 09:58 AM
link   
reply to post by MysterE
 


I believe that the illness attributed to silica only comes into effect when particulates of the substance are inhaled. In this it is similar to asbestos which can cause serious trouble when the fibers end up in the lungs.
If the coating is bonded to itself solidly enough , then there shouldnt be a problem. Only problem comes when the substance is in dust or as I said particulate form and suspended in the air you are breathing .



posted on Feb, 2 2010 @ 10:00 AM
link   
reply to post by TrueBrit
 


Good point, it was the inhalation that was dangerous from what I remember.

-E-


+9 more 
posted on Feb, 2 2010 @ 10:00 AM
link   

Originally posted by pangaea
says in the source that the product is non-toxic so i can't see why it would be.


Yeah, because companies always tell the truth regarding their products' toxicity. I don't think there has ever been a case of a company saying their product was non-toxic when it really was.

Please, anyone, feel free to correct me, if I'm wrong.



posted on Feb, 2 2010 @ 10:17 AM
link   
reply to post by MysterE
 


This sounds great! Starred & Flagged.

Would be great if you could carry a cannister around and in case someone is about to shoot at you, you can quickly spray this in front of you to stop the bullet.... ok... maybe i'm getting all Sci-Fi here but maybe in a few years it could be possible....



posted on Feb, 2 2010 @ 10:19 AM
link   

Originally posted by TheComte

Originally posted by pangaea
says in the source that the product is non-toxic so i can't see why it would be.


Yeah, because companies always tell the truth regarding their products' toxicity. I don't think there has ever been a case of a company saying their product was non-toxic when it really was.

Please, anyone, feel free to correct me, if I'm wrong.


Cigarettes!!!

Very toxic and i'm pretty sure when they first came about, there were no warnings on the packet saying 'warning... these can seriously damage your health'



posted on Feb, 2 2010 @ 10:41 AM
link   
As soon as this is out, i'm spraying my car with it.

NO MORE RUST. Death to rust!



posted on Feb, 2 2010 @ 10:44 AM
link   

Originally posted by TruthxIsxInxThexMist
reply to post by MysterE
 


This sounds great! Starred & Flagged.

Would be great if you could carry a cannister around and in case someone is about to shoot at you, you can quickly spray this in front of you to stop the bullet.... ok... maybe i'm getting all Sci-Fi here but maybe in a few years it could be possible....


Except that bullets go through panes of glass no problem. But it would produce a cool shatter effect I guess.
Spray-on Kevlar maybe?



posted on Feb, 2 2010 @ 10:45 AM
link   
reply to post by Vitchilo
 


Good point ! Kind of makes you think what other marvelous uses could this have? They could put it on coffee tables to keep the rings off!



posted on Feb, 2 2010 @ 10:48 AM
link   
reply to post by hotbakedtater
 


Sorry to lower the tone somewhat, but if 'adult toys' are coated with this stuff, apart from the anti-bacterial aspects, would the 'lube' business go out with a bang or a whimper?

(apparently this new product is slippery and does not stick)




posted on Feb, 2 2010 @ 10:51 AM
link   
reply to post by spikey
 


It depends ... I think that there may be a set of folks who would prefer this liquid glass , but at the same time there may also be traditionalists who like the "slimey" bit of eroticism.
But honestly , why bring that up



posted on Feb, 2 2010 @ 10:51 AM
link   
reply to post by Vitchilo
 


And no more car washing or waxing either!

Could this be used on boat and ship hulls too? To reduce drag?

May start to see a few around the world yacht records start to tumble if it does.



posted on Feb, 2 2010 @ 10:53 AM
link   
reply to post by spikey
 


Right. If it does work, I'm starting up a business ``special treatment`` for cars... and since people are so ignorant, they will not know about this product... so I could make tons of money... when they could do it themselves...



[edit on 2-2-2010 by Vitchilo]



posted on Feb, 2 2010 @ 10:56 AM
link   
reply to post by TrueBrit
 


Heh..Just have that kind of filthy little mind i s'pose!


It just kind of popped in (Ooer! Pnarr, Phnarr!)

Seriously though, the lube market is worth untold money. From hospital use, to industrial to..ahem..personal use.

I can see this being both a blessing and a curse, as quite a lot of sectors will be redundant.





new topics

top topics



 
92
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join