J.D. Salinger passes away at the age of 91

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posted on Jan, 28 2010 @ 12:55 PM
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J.D. Salinger passes away at the age of 91


rawstory.com

Legendary author J.D. Salinger has passed away at the age of 91.

His most famous work, "Catcher In The Rye," written over sixty years ago is still a best seller, and remains popular with younger generation.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jan, 28 2010 @ 12:55 PM
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This man's work has been implicated in many past conspiracies involving MKUltra mind control etc.

Besides being a great author Salinger created an air of mystery when he disappeared from public life long ago and lived in seclusion.

Everyone remembers that John Lennon assassin Mark David Chapman carried a copy of Catcher in Rye that fateful night.

rawstory.com
(visit the link for the full news article)

bookrags.com

As for the fate of Salinger, the few interviews he's given in the last thirty years have led more to speculation about his sanity than anything else. Gestures that might have suggested artistic integrity, such as when he sued for the right to declare that his books could not remain in print unless each edition featured only the text between two plain covers (no author bio or photograph, no praising blurbs), seem--after a series of lawsuits to keep his stories out of anthologies, to keep his life from biographies, to keep his work from making it to the screen--a bit like paranoia. Presently, Salinger is arguably less famous for his writing than he is for his personality, which periodically crashes forth in a new lawsuit or a bitter public comment.


[edit on 28-1-2010 by Leo Strauss]



posted on Jan, 28 2010 @ 12:57 PM
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R.I.P.

Catcher in the Rye was, is, and will be a masterpiece for many generations.



posted on Jan, 28 2010 @ 01:13 PM
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One of the most vital authors of recent years. Maybe it's nice to think he outlived a lot of the folk calling for "Catcher in the Rye" to be banned.



posted on Jan, 28 2010 @ 01:18 PM
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reply to post by jokei
 





Maybe it's nice to think he outlived a lot of the folk calling for "Catcher in the Rye" to be banned.


People thought that book was pornographic. I am happy to see that now we have it in most libraries, including school libraries.



posted on Jan, 28 2010 @ 01:23 PM
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One of the greats.
With Vonnegut gone, too, we have only Pynchon and McCarthy left.
As a writer, this makes me very sad.
RIP Salinger.



posted on Jan, 28 2010 @ 01:26 PM
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This is very sad. He was a brilliant writer. Actually it is a shame that he was too critical of his own work and published so little. What he let to the public is awesome but scarce. This is the rare case were i would gladly have exchanged little less quality for more quantity. And this says a lot.
I like "Frenny and Zooey" the most.
Very very sad.



posted on Jan, 28 2010 @ 01:35 PM
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If it wasn't for J.D, I wonder what Lee Harvey Oswald would have been reading when the Police stormed his apartment....



posted on Jan, 28 2010 @ 01:38 PM
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I thought he had already passed away last year or so.

Maybe it was just a discussion on his work or such.

I don't remember reading Catcher in the Rye as a youth.

Probably because I personally was going through the same issues as the main character at the same age.



posted on Jan, 28 2010 @ 01:38 PM
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Good night J.D.S.

For the record I just reread Catcher in the Rye.

I have no clue why it was banned.

The basic idea of the book is angst which seems to cause many readers angst.

Most authors are somewhat eccentric...Salinger proved no different.



posted on Jan, 28 2010 @ 01:48 PM
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Sad to see another great passing.

It's a shame to think in 30-40 years we're quite possibly going to hear about the author of Twilight represented as being as important as Salinger.



posted on Jan, 30 2010 @ 12:59 AM
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I saw the obituary for J.D. Salinger in the newspaper this morning, and had a rather weird feeling, because I was just thinking earlier this week that I want to read Catcher in the Rye. I've never read it and noticed it on my mom's bookshelf.

I watched a movie about a week ago called 'Youth in Revolt' and everything I saw on the internet about it always compares it and the novels it's based on to Catcher in the Rye, which is why I was thinking I wanted to read that book. That, and 'Youth in Revolt' had a few themes I had thought about a few months ago in an idea I had that I thought would make a great novel, so I wanted to see if Catcher was anything like my idea.

Though, for the sake of other writer's health, maybe I shouldn't think about reading any of their books anymore...!





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