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Is There Life After Death (YES!)

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posted on Jan, 24 2010 @ 12:46 PM
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Why would anyone want life after death?




posted on Jan, 24 2010 @ 01:01 PM
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reply to post by happygolucky
 



I would love for this to be true...but these OBE's and NDE's can be explained thru medical findings...

It is never going to be possible to convince everyone. But let it be said that there is much that defies such conventional explanation. This is the type of evidence that has to be considered:


...the big question for the skeptics is; how can people have clear consciousness in a state of cardiac arrest with no brain activity (flat EEG)? Clearly these cases should not be called near death experiences but life after death experiences because people with cardiac arrest are clearly dead with no breathing or heart beat.

The best documented instance of this paradox is the case of Pam Reynolds. In 1991, Reynolds was diagnosed with a brain tumor and had to undergo very complex surgery called "hypothermic cardiac arrest." This is a procedure where the body temperature is lowered, the heartbeat and breathing stopped, the blood is drained from the body, and the brain waves are totally flat.

From 11:05 a.m. to 12:00 noon, Reynolds was clinically dead with flat EEG during the operation and in this timeframe she had a near-death experience. After coming back she was able to describe the instruments used during the operation and even conversations between the staff in the operating room. Both the instruments used and the conversations was later confirmed by the doctor and nurse.

Furthermore, her ears where plugged with a sound device that would make it impossible for her to hear anything. Dr. Spetzler, who carried out the operation, later said that, "At that stage in the operation, nobody can observe, hear, in that state...I don't have an explanation for it." There is no explanation and Pam's case is one of the strongest signs of life after death that have ever been recorded and monitored by science.

The case of Pam Reynolds is not only a case of clinical death beyond reasonable doubt, but also provides a clear case of "veridical perception," where things seen or heard by the person during the NDE are later confirmed by others. In the study of veridical perception some studies have shown remarkable results. In one study of 16 cases, 88 percent of perceptions outside the body appeared to be accurate and 31 percent could be confirmed by objective means. In another study involving 93 cases, 92 percent appeared to be completely accurate with 35 percent being confirmed by objective means...

...Interestingly, not only did he find that people who had poor eyesight could see clearly during the near-death experience, but he also found that some blind people were able to see for the very first time. In his study Ring found that 80 percent out of thirty-one blind people who had a near-death experience were able to see during their experience.

Vicky, one person who had been completely blind from birth and survived two near-death experiences, explained, "Those two experiences were the only time I could ever relate to seeing, and to what light was, because I experienced it. I was able to see." Another person, Brad, who had also been blind from birth said, "I know I could see and I was supposed to be blind...It was very clear when I was out. I could see details and everything."


This gets even more interesting when Ring then wanted to compare their eyeless seeing with their dreams. When asked to compare their near-death experiences to their dreams, both Vicky and Brad answered that there were no similarity at all. The big difference is that blind people do not see things in their dreams like sighted people do.

Vicky tells us that, "I have dreams in which I touch things...I taste things, touch things, hear things and smell things-that's it." And when asked whether she was able to see anything at all during her dreams she answers, "Nothing. No color, no sight of any sort, no shadows, no light, no nothing."

Brad explained the same, "I've had the very same consciousness level in my dreams as I've had in my waking hours. And that would be that all my senses function...except vision. In my dreams, I have no visual perceptions at all."

Here are examples of two people who have never been able to see, but in their near-death experience are able to see for the first time. How is it possible for these blind people to transcend the sensory restrictions?



Here's the whole article



reply to post by die_another_day
 



Why would anyone want life after death?

Wouldn't you say the reality of what happens is more important than what we want? (Especially as one day it's going to be a lot more than a theoretical discussion - for each one of us.)



posted on Jan, 24 2010 @ 01:04 PM
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If their is life after death IE consciousness, would you really want to live forever ? I'm not sure if I would albeit we wouldn't know the circumstances of our existence. But death is thrust upon us all so it's only a matter of time before we know or not


[edit on 24-1-2010 by toshly]



posted on Jan, 24 2010 @ 01:06 PM
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The difference is that spirit travel is driven by the energy released from the body -- the kundalini is electrochemical and then the spirit is light and the astral body is electromagnetic. So it's known that under stress a certain molecule or protein causes people to have hallucinations or visions -- adrenchrome or something -- Professor Tim Ingold talks about this, arguing it has adaptive value -- that the visions are actually able to transmit information to help a person survive.

reply to post by happygolucky
 



posted on Jan, 24 2010 @ 01:06 PM
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To OP:

You should check out Raymond Moody's (PHD) book, life after death. In his career he documented over 50 cases of near death experiences, all with 15 or so identical aspects. It's a good read.



posted on Jan, 24 2010 @ 01:18 PM
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Last week I read the three books by Robert A Monroe and I am well convinced.
He spent decades researching OBEs.
The books are -
Journeys out of Body
Far Journeys
Ultimate Journey
.. I found them free on the web.

Here is the website for the research Institute he founded...well worth an explore.
(I have found the page which has a video about the thread question asked)
www.monroeinstitute.org...



posted on Jan, 24 2010 @ 01:20 PM
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I haven't done any research on this topic so I have a question. How do they know that the person had the experience while he/she was "clinically dead" etc?



posted on Jan, 24 2010 @ 01:20 PM
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reply to post by Kandinsky
 


A better place is reserved for those without tons of baggage and demons. The people who do not have closure to these demons and baggage are confined to a particular environment and controlled by a central more powerful entity/shadow. Some are merely trapped because they do not understand that they are dead.

The people who are free of what I call conscious failure move on to what you call a better place.

There is a reason people repent or change their ways, it is evident in every religous writing - to move on you must be free of that which you need to face. If you don't face it in life, you will face it in death.



posted on Jan, 24 2010 @ 01:27 PM
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Juan, one of the mexican laborers at my last job was in a really bad car accident a couple blocks away from the job site. He was in a coma for two days and he said he floated out of his body and had a wonderful feeling. He said he wants to tell everyone that it happened and there is life after death.



posted on Jan, 24 2010 @ 01:30 PM
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reply to post by pause4thought
 


Wow...

I never heard of the blind cases before...

That just adds more and more credence to the validity of NDE's as being proof of an afterlife.

For someone to be blind at birth, and then finally understand what it is to "see" through this experience is absolutely incredible.

This is in my mind proves that these experiences are something "other worldly". There is no way at all that a brain that has never been able to process and compose sight would be able to hallucinate it, or even "see" the optic nerves firing out, as the skeptics claim.



posted on Jan, 24 2010 @ 01:34 PM
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reply to post by Mr_skepticc
 


Great, that is YOUR opinion but in no way the reality. What you are trying to do here is to reassure yourself. The reality is quite something else
. With that kind of beliefs, you will probably enjoy it when your turn comes...



posted on Jan, 24 2010 @ 01:36 PM
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reply to post by die_another_day
 


Why? Because they cant stand the fact that death is the end. It is a collective phobia. People will reassure themselves with crazy beliefs and deny the facts. Nothing can be done for that kind of trash.



posted on Jan, 24 2010 @ 01:42 PM
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www.mindbodysymposium.com...

Dr Sam Parnia, you have to check this mans work.

www.mindbodysymposium.com...
The AWARE Study
The AWARE (AWAreness during REsuscitation) study is the first launched by the Human Consciousness Project and is led by Dr. Sam Parnia, a world-renowned expert on the study of the human mind and consciousness during clinical death, together with Dr Peter Fenwick and Professors Stephen Holgate and Robert Peveler of the University of Southampton. The team will be working in collaboration with more than 25 major medical centers throughout Europe, Canada, and the United States......
source link above.


[edit on 24-1-2010 by gusan]



posted on Jan, 24 2010 @ 01:45 PM
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reply to post by DGFenrir
 


I gave the link to this above:



Neurologist and University of Toledo Neuroscience Researcher, Dr. John Greenfield considers the EEG data from patients with near death experience (NDE). eeg-book21For near death experience skeptics, medical evidence of a flat EEG during an out of body experience has always been a stumbling block. After all, a brain dead patient can’t hallucinate. But, does a flat EEG really mean no brain activity? NDE doubters have claimed activity deep inside the brain, beyond the reach of EEG instruments, must account for the complex “realer than real” experiences reported by those who briefly pass into the afterlife. Now, University of Toledo Neuroscience researcher, and EEG expert, Dr. John Greenfield explains why this claim doesn’t hold up. “It’s very unlikely that a hypoperfused brain [someone with no blood flow to the brain], with no evidence of electrical activity could generate NDEs. Human studies as well as animal studies have typically shown very little brain perfusion [blood flow] or glucose utilization when the EEG is flat. There are deep brain areas involved in generating memories that might still operate at some very reduced level during cardiac arrest, but of course any subcortically generated activity can’t be brought to consciousness without at least one functioning cerebral hemisphere. So even if there were some way that NDEs were generated during the hypoxic state [while the brain is shut off from oxygen], you would not experience them until reperfusion [blood flow] allowed you to dream them or wake up and talk about them”, Greenfield stated. NDE Researcher, Dr. Penny Sartori, examines memories of resuscitation by patients suffering cardiac arrest. With near death experience cases making there way into the, New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of Psychiatry, and other major medical journals, NDE doubters have looked to the timing of patient memories as a way of explaining this unexplainable phenomena. If memories of out of body travel, and all embracing love occur after ones brush with death, NDEs may still fit within our medical science worldview. The timing of NDE memories is the research question Dr. Penny Sartori sought to answer, “I worked in the intensive care unit and because of the nature of my job, of course, I’d come across a lot of death. And of course makes you wonder what happens when we die. For five years I gathered data, where I spoke to patients in the intensive care unit and particularly patients who’d had a cardiac arrest. When these patients revived, as soon as they were medically fit, I approached them and asked the simple question, ‘Did you have any memory of the time that you were unconscious?’” “For the people who had a near-death experience and out of body experience [their recollection of resuscitation] was really quite accurate and I decided then to ask the control group, the people who’d had a cardiac arrest but had no recollection of anything at all. I asked them if they would reenact their resuscitation scenario and tell me what they thought that we had done to resuscitate them. And what I found is that many of the patients couldn’t even guess as to what we’d done. They had no idea at all. And then some of them did make guesses, but these were based on TV hospital dramas that they’d seen. I found that what they reported was widely inaccurate. So there was a stark contrast really in the very accurate out of body experiences reported and then the guesses that the control group had made.”, Dr. Sartori reported. While research like this may never be enough to convince dogmatic skeptics, the medical evidence for near death experience continues to challenge us to reexamine our beliefs about what lies beyond death.


[edit on 24-1-2010 by drew hempel]



posted on Jan, 24 2010 @ 01:48 PM
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I don't understand why they call them Near Death Experiences, I mean some people are in fact really dead. We should call them Death Experiences instead, but I guess that wouldn't really have as good of ring to it. From all my readings it seems that a person is usually urged or forced to return for some unknown reason. Interesting article, we can't really know what happens when one has to stay in the afterlife but it does suggest these cases are real and probably happening more frequently since medicine can revive some people who are on the verge of death.



posted on Jan, 24 2010 @ 01:49 PM
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reply to post by die_another_day
 


So what I'm learning now isn't all a waste of time. I enjoy the School for souls concept.



posted on Jan, 24 2010 @ 02:05 PM
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Well, let me ask you guys this. What's the more scariest scenario, You die and there is nothing, you go into a state of non-existance like before (debatable on the like before part, moving on) OR when we die there is a God and a judgment, or we become trapped spirits that just roam on forever and ever..which one of these is the worse scenario???????????????



posted on Jan, 24 2010 @ 02:11 PM
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reply to post by pause4thought
 


Thanks for posting this. I have viewed the first video clip you posted about 3 years ago, and it really made an in-print to mind which I will never forget. The part that I remembered which made the biggest impression on me was when the guy who died, Ian McCormack, died ( after a box jellyfish attack of the coast of Mauritius while diving with his precise description of the process until he entered into the state after life as is known).

This video is well presented, but if you are interested a more descriptive account of his experience, you read it at:

Ian McCormack's experience after death



posted on Jan, 24 2010 @ 02:19 PM
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I hate the term life after death, what comes next is life. Death is birth, into actual life. Our time in this reality is so short it can not be perceived as life. Our very being here is a shell to experience the tangible. The problem is that the tangible is so much less then the intangible. This is a reality where our senses rule, not our spirit. What comes next is a connection to all substance which our senses can not perceive. Our life here is much like time spent in the mother's womb. We are nourished and developed from inside another entity for we are not yet ready for the world outside that entity. This reality is a mother's womb nourishing and developing us for the another existence outside this entity we think is life.



posted on Jan, 24 2010 @ 02:25 PM
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reply to post by Mr_skepticc
 


Well, let me ask you guys this. What's the more scariest scenario, You die and there is nothing, you go into a state of non-existance like before (debatable on the like before part, moving on) OR when we die there is a God and a judgment, or we become trapped spirits that just roam on forever and ever..which one of these is the worse scenario?


I've got the awful suspicion that if there's a criteria for where we go to after death...there must be jobsworths and bureaucrats waiting. Instead of the 'wonderful hereafter,' it could be a queue. A long queue. Filling out forms and being told that you're at the wrong window and need to report to another department.

You know that whiney type of ATS member that enjoys reminding members of the T&Cs? The type that hasn't mentally progressed from telling tales to teacher? If they have any authority on the other side...that's scary!






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