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Skydiver to fall from 120,000 feet!!

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posted on Jan, 22 2010 @ 02:12 PM
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reply to post by harrytuttle
 
Thank you, that clears things up for me!
second line




posted on Jan, 22 2010 @ 02:29 PM
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reply to post by colloredbrothers
 


That was friggin awesome!!!

And even complete with 80's music



posted on Jan, 22 2010 @ 03:10 PM
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Hmmm apparently this guy must have two huge metal boulders inside his pants, if you know what I mean. I feel weird just getting on a plane. I can't even magine falling from over 100,000 feet.



posted on Jan, 22 2010 @ 03:32 PM
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I've never been sky diving or anything like that but I can't imagine there's a big difference between doing it normally and going from 120k feet. I mean, I know there's a huge difference with regard to environment, preparation, etc. but essentially you're risking your life and you're sky diving. If I HAD to go sky diving i don't think i'd care whether it was 120k feet or the standard height. It's all scary as hell in my book, but I'd love to try it from 120k. wow.



posted on Jan, 22 2010 @ 03:39 PM
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Skydiving is kinda the last thrill in my opinion. Though I would like to try one of those suits that let you fly. I think this would be awesome.



posted on Jan, 22 2010 @ 04:07 PM
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Well I would rather he do it than me. I have a thing about heights. I guess it is no so much the actual height but the sudden stop should I fall that scares me most.

Well I wish the guy the best; though in my opinion it is sort of stupid. If he should have an equipment failure though, as a previous poster said his sudden stop will be very drastic. Without trying to sound to crass regardless of how this turns out it will make an interesting video, should they video it.

Raist



posted on Jan, 22 2010 @ 04:14 PM
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he also doesnt burn up as he will be wearing a pressurised suit which would be heat resistant, and hopefuly will protect him from and shock-wave when going through the speed of sound.



posted on Jan, 22 2010 @ 04:22 PM
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Originally posted by butcherguy
I would like to know why a person falling to earth from the edge of space doesn't burn up like a meteor or a satellite falling out of orbit. Same laws of physics apply to a human body as a rock or spacecraft. Any ideas?
A meteor or spacecraft would be travelling at thousands of miles per hour relative to the earth's motion- the meteor because the earth passes through the debris field and the spacecraft because of it's orbital velocity.
The diver would be relatively stationary in relation to the earth.



posted on Jan, 22 2010 @ 09:59 PM
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Originally posted by TruthxIsxInxThexMist
If you ask me i'd say this guy is verging on the insane.... it's -100 c up there... could easily die.... not just from the cold but from the sheer speed he will be going...


If 900 mph of speed killed us like I expect to see falling from that altitude, we'd all be dead.

The people near the equator are moving that fast or faster, it's about 24,000 miles around the earth which rotates once every 24 hours, so that's 1000 miles per hour speed at the equator just due to the rotation of the earth, but that's small compared to the speed we are going revolving around the sun, which is over 33,000 miles per hour!!!

And you think someone could die from going 900 miles an hour when you are going over 33,000 miles an hour right now? You can't even feel your speed and as others have pointed out, a freefalling person doesn't feel much either, the forces are balanced until the chute opens.

That jump sounds like it would be quite an experience, at least it won't be over too quickly like jumps at lower altitudes seem to be.



posted on Jan, 26 2010 @ 03:03 AM
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Originally posted by The Cyfre
I've never been sky diving or anything like that but I can't imagine there's a big difference between doing it normally and going from 120k feet. I mean, I know there's a huge difference with regard to environment, preparation, etc. but essentially you're risking your life and you're sky diving. If I HAD to go sky diving i don't think i'd care whether it was 120k feet or the standard height. It's all scary as hell in my book, but I'd love to try it from 120k. wow.


G'day The Cyfre

Have a really good look at the Kittinger videos & then reconfirm you don't think there's much difference between a jump from a few thousand feet & the final jump that he did.

Seriously.....I must have watched it 100 times & I still truly cannot believe what he did.

Total, utterly awesome.....!!!!!

Here.....

I've added my favourite vid of the jump & a recent lecture by Joe himself that includes some great details & anecdote......balls of absolute steel (& I never say anything like that on here!)





Cheers
Maybe...maybe not


[edit on 26-1-2010 by Maybe...maybe not]



posted on Feb, 5 2010 @ 12:01 AM
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reply to post by azzllin
 


The video you posted is so epic... Watched it so many times.

To do what Kittinger did... Back in 1960... It far surpasses what this guy is trying to do in 2010 (to me anyways).

Kittinger is a world hero IMO.

*Edit: Inspired me to schedule my first jump this June.

[edit on 5-2-2010 by Neodoxa]

[edit on 5-2-2010 by Neodoxa]



posted on Feb, 5 2010 @ 10:05 AM
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reply to post by TruthxIsxInxThexMist
 


It's not the speed that kills, but the acceleration. As others have pointed out, speed is relative, acceleration most definitely isn't.



posted on Feb, 5 2010 @ 10:29 AM
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I saw this story somewhere last week. The guy in the interview was saying that when looking down upon Earth, there is not a sense of falling from that height; however, when looking up at the plane It becomes very clear just how fast one is falling.

These people definitely have a brass pair...

BTW, something about this reminds me of the scene in the new Star Trek movie where they dive from space on to the planet below.



posted on Feb, 5 2010 @ 10:34 AM
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reply to post by Aggie Man
 


Similar, but space is about 3 times higher than this guy will jump from. The Kármán line is at 100 km, and this guy will be jumping from about 36 km.



posted on Feb, 5 2010 @ 10:38 AM
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Originally posted by Now_Then
Well in 1960 a guy jumped from 102,800 feet, and the materials used in this guys kit will be much better now a days, it should be a lot safer. (although the guy in 1960 almost lost a hand to the cold, his glove leaked - he didn't tell the ground crew cos he thought they'd have him abandon the jump!).

The one I want to see is orbital skydiving! Sign me up for that!
yer did you ever see a pik of his hand it was huge because that was the only part of him not preshrised lol



posted on Mar, 15 2010 @ 11:09 AM
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That has got to be an awesome feeling, more so than a skydive at regular altitude. I would definately go for it if I had the money and resources


Even though this new jump may be for a "stunt", there will still be a lot of useful data, R&D and equipment that comes of it.



posted on Mar, 15 2010 @ 11:35 AM
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Originally posted by Now_Then
Well in 1960 a guy jumped from 102,800 feet,
(although the guy in 1960 almost lost a hand to the cold, his glove leaked - he didn't tell the ground crew cos he thought they'd have him abandon the jump!).





length 6:54:


www.youtube.com...

i heard about the jump on radio/TV at the time...
and just a week or so ago, the History Channel showed a program of his jump from space.

[edit on 15-3-2010 by St Udio]



posted on Mar, 15 2010 @ 11:37 AM
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If I'm not mistaken the stop from 120,000 feet wouldn't be any worse than one from 10,000. Terminal velocity kicks in with the thicker atmosphere and would slow to the same speed. But I could be wrong cus it's been a few years. Not the math just a few years since I've been wrong.



posted on Mar, 15 2010 @ 11:49 AM
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So how will he decelerate? Wouldn't the whiplash from opening a parachute going 700+mph be hard on the body?



posted on Mar, 15 2010 @ 11:43 PM
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Originally posted by DJM8507
So how will he decelerate? Wouldn't the whiplash from opening a parachute going 700+mph be hard on the body?


Initially he will speed up due to the lack of atmosphere (aka resistance). The lower he gets, the thicker the atmospehere is, the more resistance or drag he will encounter, and the slower he will go. Terminal Velocity for a normal skydive in the belly to earth position is around 120 mph, at higher altitudes that would increase because the density of the atmosphere decreases and puts less resistance or drag on falling objects. No, there will not be a supersonic whiplash.

Hope that helps.

[edit on 16/3/2010 by SportyMB]



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