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Good News... You’re all mentally ill

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posted on Feb, 1 2010 @ 10:12 AM
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reply to post by davesidious
 


.......such a shame as well.




posted on Feb, 1 2010 @ 10:13 AM
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Originally posted by davesidious
reply to post by Rising Against
 


From my experience on ATS, that describes the majority, not the minority.


I always must laugh see you posting, - take it easy, but Dave is my real name ^^. Maybe you are my alternative schizophrenic Person, and I can't remember. - Just a Joke



posted on Feb, 1 2010 @ 10:14 AM
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Miss post...

[edit on 1-2-2010 by cushycrux]



posted on Feb, 1 2010 @ 10:18 AM
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When I was younger I looked at some conspiracy's with great wonder and excitement, and thought to myself, wow! imagine if this is true. Alot of these stories were exciting and great fodder for hollywood sci-fi and also my younger naive self. I never really sought out evidence I was to beguiled by the stories themselves to care for proof. Perhaps then, I was mentally ill?

These days I've become a bit of a cynic, it now tsakes a little more than a far out story to get me excited. I don't really know if its the wisdom of age, or the lack of proof provided over the years for on-going conspiracy's, like the existance of alien visits to Earth.

Perhaps it is sites like this one that have pushed me to further cynicism. After all, if there is proof of something its a good bet it will end up in a place like this first.


That being said, there are some things I still have faith in, without any concrete evidence. But, I rarely speak of such things to the "general" population(friends/family etc). They just label you "crazy".

I wonder though........


If the majority of the those who would label you mentally ill or crazy for believing in something like say, aliens crashing in roswell in '47, I have to wonder do these people believe in god?



posted on Feb, 1 2010 @ 10:37 AM
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reply to post by cushycrux
 


It's quite possible! :-P

reply to post by PowerSlave
 


I used to be the same, too. I've not been able to put it so eloquently as you, but your early infatuation mirrors my own exactly. I loved the stories. I loved the idea that there were shadowy cabals hiding aliens, that secret jet planes were buzzing Belgium and parts of England, and so on.

Then, and I can't remember exactly where (though I suspect it had something to do with me attending a university, or maybe just becoming more cynical), and those stories fell apart. There was no evidence, so why should I believe them? To believe those stories would mean to avoid hypocrisy, I'd have to believe every story anyone could conceive of.

And no, I don't believe in God, for the reasons above



posted on Feb, 1 2010 @ 11:15 AM
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Originally posted by davesidious
reply to post by Rising Against
 


In psychiatry, a belief is considered delusional if all of the following are true:


  • certainty (held with absolute conviction)
  • incorrigibility (not changeable by compelling counterargument or proof to the contrary)
  • impossibility or falsity of content (implausible, bizarre or patently untrue)


Plenty of ATS members habour beliefs that clearly and easily meet those three criteria, rendering them delusional.


You know edison said that Tesla's ideas all met this criteria. The Catholic Church said the same thing about several scientist. Yuo have to be slow to judge some times.

However, believing a guy cut you off in traffic, or stepped on your new shoes, because the gov't is harrasing you is hard to swallow. A lot of those guys do come across as paranoid schizophrenics.



posted on Feb, 1 2010 @ 11:18 AM
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reply to post by MikeNice81
 


I'm not sure I follow a word of that



posted on Feb, 1 2010 @ 11:27 AM
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reply to post by davesidious
 


Don't worry. I don't really either now that I posted. I have a tendency to think big and butcher it somewhere between my brain and fingertips.

The short version is this. A lot of great scientist were called delusional. Eddison even claimed Tesla's most mundane works were delusional and faulty. The Catholic church said that we must be the center of the universe because god created us in his image. Everyone else was called delusional for arguing against their "proof."

When eveidnce is presented we must be slow to judge some one as delusional just because they challenge what we know or what we consider unflagging truth. We have to apply strict standards of critical thought to all sides of the argument.

That said, most of these gang stalker theorist do come across as mentally ill. No matter how I try to filter it or flip it. They seem unbalanced.



posted on Feb, 1 2010 @ 12:27 PM
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Conspiratorial-Thinking is a helpful additional viewpoint from which one should be able to view world events from. Its a shame schools dont teach it. But to base ones entire outlook on "everything is a conspiracy" is a big mistake, imo.



posted on Feb, 1 2010 @ 12:34 PM
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reply to post by MikeNice81
 


Anyone calling great scientists engaging in science delusional are, and were, wrong. Science is never delusional, as it's always based on observations. People calling Tesla delusional, for example, could be quite right as he did make a lot of claims that he could never demonstrate (ie he ceased practicing science, and started practicing story-telling). Either he was delusional about his work, or for some strange reason never bothered to document these massive technological leaps.

If someone has evidence, you can judge it in a microsecond. We don't need to wait for evidence to become more valid, as that's not how evidence works.

So, it boils down to "put up or shut up" - those making claims of conspiracies better show their evidence, or simply shut up until they have evidence to show.

If someone maintains that a conspiracy is true, without evidence, then they are by definition being delusional.

reply to post by Skyfloating
 


'Critical thinking' is the actual term, and it's becoming more and more popular in schools. Always looking for a conspiracy is not a good idea, but being able to realise illogical arguments, is, which I think is what you were getting at.



posted on Feb, 1 2010 @ 12:36 PM
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reply to post by davesidious
 


Yes somewhat but even more than that, detective-like thinking and thinking in multiple reality-levels - which is not quite taught in school. A little more than mere critical thinking.



posted on Feb, 1 2010 @ 12:39 PM
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Originally posted by davesidious
reply to post by Skyfloating
 


'Critical thinking' is the actual term, and it's becoming more and more popular in schools. Always looking for a conspiracy is not a good idea, but being able to realise illogical arguments, is, which I think is what you were getting at.


The Dark Side Of "Conspiracy Theory."



posted on Feb, 1 2010 @ 01:01 PM
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reply to post by davesidious
 


My point is that we must entertain evidence even if it is bizare or patently untrue. Many would have said the idea of a president asking people to break in to a hotel was bizare. Yet we know it did happen because people provided evidence that challenged popular precepction.

Evidence is required for any claim. However, we must be willing to investigate evidence if it is supported. If it is beyond anecdotal we have a duty to check it out even if we consider it bizare, or implausible. That doesn't mean we have to believe everything. It just means we have to be open to listen.

A lot of conspiracies and paranormal things I hear on ATS makes me want to yank my hair out. So I do understand the need to filter things. I'm not saying all things are a conspiracy.

I don't really know where this is headed. I just think that too many times people are written off as delusional a little too fast. Then again, a lot of times I can't believe people entertain the unbalanced ramblings of certain people.



posted on Feb, 1 2010 @ 01:02 PM
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reply to post by MikeNice81
 


If it's patently untrue, it's not evidence.

All evidence must be based on reality, surely



posted on Feb, 1 2010 @ 01:05 PM
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reply to post by Skyfloating
 


Critical thinking, by its very definition, is the most critical anyone can think. "Multiple reality" doesn't even enter in to it, as there is one reality, this one. If others exist, and what's happening in them, is of no concern to us, as there is no way we can know they exist, or what's happening in them.

And science classes, good ones at least, are the place where kids learn critical thinking. I recognise that in many countries science teaching is seriously lacking, and that's a big worry. Judging by the attitudes of many "believers" on this board, some folks seem to demand their ideas be taken seriously even if they can't be bothered, or are able, to demonstrate them as being true.



posted on Feb, 1 2010 @ 01:22 PM
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Originally posted by davesidious
there is one reality, this one.

there is no way we can know they exist, or what's happening in them.



Thats the other end of the spectrum. Its because they kept telling us "there is no other reality" that we get into conspiracy-theories in the first place.



posted on Feb, 1 2010 @ 01:32 PM
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reply to post by Skyfloating
 


I think you're confusing the term reality with perspective, or possibility. It's a common delusion these days.



posted on Feb, 1 2010 @ 01:36 PM
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Ah, "reality!" Does it even exist? I'm not saying it doesn't, but does it? And if it does, what the # does it want from us (if anything)? How may it be appeased (if it may even be)?

And if it doesn't...



posted on Feb, 1 2010 @ 01:38 PM
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Originally posted by unityemissions
I think you're confusing the term reality with perspective, or possibility. It's a common delusion these days.


No, Im not. A perspective is my angle, view, standpoint. By "reality" I mean a plane of existence (as in other Dimension) or a hidden Scenario (as in Politics-behind-the-curtains).



posted on Feb, 1 2010 @ 01:51 PM
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reply to post by Skyfloating
 


A hidden scenario can only be known as a possibility though one's perspective, not a reality. Guess this is just semantics, though.




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