Chupacabra found in TX...again!

page: 1
2
<<   2 >>

log in

join

posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 02:33 PM
link   
I have no opinion on this one. I have always maintained that the Chupacabra is simply a mangy coyote. BUT, the pictures and video of this one do seem quite different than previous chupacabra carcasses. Here is the link...you decide for yourselves:

www.kens5.com...

Enjoy!

[edit on 19-1-2010 by Aggie Man]




posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 03:08 PM
link   
looks like a dog....

looks like a opossum....

reminds me a little of an armadillo.

those teeth are gnarly.

maybe a badger? not likely

doesnt really look like a rodent...

who knows, maybe its something exotic that was shipped in as a pet?

i wanna know what it is though



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 03:11 PM
link   
reply to post by mahtoosacks
 


I know it's not...BUT It looks a lot like a hairless Tasmanian tiger.

Alleged Chupacabra



Tasmanian Tiger





[edit on 19-1-2010 by Aggie Man]



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 03:19 PM
link   

Originally posted by Aggie Man
reply to post by mahtoosacks
 


I know it's not...BUT It looks a lot like a hairless Tasmanian tiger.

Alleged Chupacabra



Tasmanian Tiger





[edit on 19-1-2010 by Aggie Man]


It looks like a pit bull that has mange to me.



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 03:23 PM
link   
The article says that "Animal experts are baffled." I have seen this before and it usually turns out to be something easily identifiable. Is there a ready team of "experts" available for tabloid news?



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 03:29 PM
link   
aggieman, i saw that on the news (different channel) a few days ago that some dudes chickens got killed, puncture marks, no blood, etc.

have they sent it off for testing?

btw, i'm no expert BUT to me that does NOT look like a mangy pit - snout is too long (unless he has a HUGE overbite, not to common with those breeds), skin is wrong texture for mange (i have had dogs with mange), no protruding jaw muscles, teeth too long - it just does not look like a pit bull terrier. maybe a mix of the hairless tiger and a pit, but not one or the other - should be interesting to find out....



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 03:29 PM
link   

Originally posted by Lillydale
The article says that "Animal experts are baffled." I have seen this before and it usually turns out to be something easily identifiable. Is there a ready team of "experts" available for tabloid news?


I agree, DNA tests will no doubt prove that this is a canine. Typically, I wouldn't post something like this, but as I stated in my OP, this one looks different that past "chupacabra" specimens. I only present it for consideration. I know that there are many cryptozoology enthusiasts here on ATS,so this thread was more for them than it is for the skeptics...me being one of the skeptics. However, with that being said, I appreciate ALL opinions/points of view being expressed.

[edit on 19-1-2010 by Aggie Man]



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 03:37 PM
link   

Originally posted by Aggie Man
I only present it for consideration. I know that there are many cryptozoology enthusiasts here on ATS,so this thread was more for them than it is for the skeptics...


I clicked on the thread because I am one of those enthusiasts. I love this stuff and rarely comment as I have no real knowledge. Usually all I can do is sit and wonder. I am quite glad you brought it up. You never know when a new species will be discovered so I think everything is worth a look. I just could not help but notice this very familiar phrase that dates back to bat-boy. I am not picking on your thread, just that phrase in the article you linked to. My apologies if it seemed otherwise. I appreciate the thread and the pics. I always enjoy this stuff and if it were to turn out to be even a new species of known animal, I would enjoy that as well. I starred and flagged ya, did not mean to insult.



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 03:44 PM
link   
reply to post by Lillydale
 


No worries...I wasn't offended or anything...I just misinterpreted the tabloid part of your comment


I was just thinking...we may be seeing speciation appearing right before our eyes?

For those that don't know what speciation is:

Speciation is the evolutionary process by which new biological species arise.

Could this be the budding of a new branch in the mammalian "family tree"?

[edit on 19-1-2010 by Aggie Man]



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 03:47 PM
link   
reply to post by Aggie Man
 


I think that would be great for the simple fact that it would really cause an uproar in the scientific community. Anything new is cool though. I would love to see just the new creatures discovered in the last decade put together. I am sure that would be astounding. This would be particularly incredible because of the location though. Either way, no matter what - nice find.



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 03:50 PM
link   
It looks like a hairless staffordshire bull terrier/ mongrel. Swollen and bloated. If I had the patience to 'search' (I'm tired as time), it really reminds of one that turned up mid-last year in a similar state. That one was identified, but I can't remember what it was. There's sure to be a thread on it.


"My wife wouldn't let me keep it in the freezer," he said, so Potter gave it to the Center for Animal Research and Education.


...because she's obviously the brains behind the marriage? "Hey hun, I've put roadkill in the freezer. Make me a sammitch."

"Go screw yourself Tony. It ain't goin in no freezer
"



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 03:53 PM
link   
It's a hairless Fox. no shocker... without their bushy tail, and hair, they look exactly like this.

Here is a male Fox, dead with hair, laying in the same fashon. perfect match.



[edit on 1/19/2010 by Pharyax]

[edit on 1/19/2010 by Pharyax]

[edit on 1/19/2010 by Pharyax]



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 03:55 PM
link   
reply to post by Aggie Man
 


Looks too canine to be a Chupacabra, pretty sure Chupacabra is supposed to be more alien, green skin, red glowing eyes and sometimes wings reported.

jackal, jackal, it looks like a jackal




All kidding aside I doubt this is a Chupacabra. It could be some type of wild dog we've never seen before but that doesn't make it the goat sucker.

[edit on 19-1-2010 by Titen-Sxull]



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 03:56 PM
link   
If its not a dog my other guess would be a 'possum due to the cruve of the tail.



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 03:57 PM
link   

Originally posted by Pharyax
It's a hairless Fox. no shocker... without their bushy tail, and hair, they look exactly like this.


Hairless fox, maybe. But here is a pic of a hairless fox....many differences.

4.bp.blogspot.com...



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 04:00 PM
link   

Originally posted by Frogs
If its not a dog my other guess would be a 'possum due to the cruve of the tail.



I thought the same thing too...at first....but look at the nose....possums have pink (flesh colored) noses...this one is black



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 04:00 PM
link   

Originally posted by Aggie Man

Originally posted by Pharyax
It's a hairless Fox. no shocker... without their bushy tail, and hair, they look exactly like this.


Hairless fox, maybe. But here is a pic of a hairless fox....many differences.

4.bp.blogspot.com...


But take into account that the body becomes bloated and it loses its natural 'shape'..



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 05:14 PM
link   
It's a coatimundi. Their range is south texas to bolivia, where they found was just a bit north of the normal range.
It seems every dead animal someone finds without hair is the next chupacabra

Keep trying, maybe they'll actually find one someday.



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 05:47 PM
link   
www.terrierman.com...
Heres a site with a hairless fox with mange that died.



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 05:47 PM
link   
reply to post by Asktheanimals
 



Coatis, genera Nasua and Nasuella, also known as Brazilian aardvarks, Mexican tejón, hog-nosed coons,[1] pisotes, and snookum bears, are members of the raccoon family (Procyonidae). They are diurnal mammals native to South, Central, and south-western North America. The word "coatimundi" (pronounced /koʊˌɑːtɨˈmʌndi/ [2]) is a commonly used misnomer applied to solitary adult males of N. nasua. The term is reported to be derived from the Tupi language (Brazil).[3]


Figures it would be a raccoon type animal yet again.

Coati Wikipedia Page

edit to add: I did not mean to seem to assume that is definitive.



[edit on 1/19/10 by Lillydale]





new topics
top topics
 
2
<<   2 >>

log in

join