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Largest Solar Flare in 2 Years - 'M' Class

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posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 11:15 AM
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Today, Jan. 19th at 1340 UT, Earth-orbiting satellites detected the strongest solar flare in almost two years. The M2-class eruption came from old sunspot 1039, currently located behind the sun's eastern limb. Considering the fact that the sunspot is not even visible from Earth, the flare was probably much stronger than its M2 classification would suggest. Stay tuned for updates!




Strongest Flare for two years and increased activity in the last few weeks. Me thinks our Sun is definatley awoken from the long lull.

Luckily this flare was not on the Earth Facing side!

G.


www.spaceweather.com...
www.swpc.noaa.gov...




posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 12:10 PM
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reply to post by grantbeed
 

I have no Idea what this means M2? - Is that high or normal ? Also if it was facing the earth and it occured would it wipe out satellite communications and electric (what would be the ramifications?) . I know from reading the Sun is quiet and scientists are awaiting for a new cycle to start . Is it a possibility that the delayed activity could all come at once ? Like pressure building for an earthquake ? Just curious to know more on this subject . Thanks .



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 12:14 PM
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source

Solar Flare Classifications

Ranking of a solar flare is based on its x-ray output. Flares are classified according to the order of magnitude of the peak burst intensity (I) measured at the earth in the 0.1 to 0.8 nm wavelength band as follows:
Peak, 0.1 to 0.8 nm band
Class (Watts/square metre)
B I < 10-6
C 10-6 I < 10-5
M 10-5 I < 10-4
X I 10-4
A multiplier is used to indicate the level within each class. For example:

M6 = 6 X 10-5 Watts/square metre

[edit on 1/19/2010 by iforget]

[edit on 1/19/2010 by iforget]



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 12:23 PM
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reply to post by Hermitoutofhishole
 


There has been much talk about this upcoming solar cycle. It looks as if it may be the most powerful since modern electronics. A huge solar flare on the side of the sun facing the earth could knock out many things. Obviously first at risk are satellites but a bad enough flare could act as a huge EMP knocking out the power grid making just about everything useless. Obviously that would be worst case scenario.

www.nowpublic.com...

[edit on 19-1-2010 by NWtoHide]

[edit on 19-1-2010 by NWtoHide]



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 03:10 PM
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reply to post by Hermitoutofhishole
 


hi there,

It's doubtful this could wipe out satellites at this level. there have been many 'M" class and 'X' class Flares that have not caused any disturbance here on earth before.

Although that does does mean that all flares this size would not have effects.

I doubt we will see a massive onslaught of solar activity all at once like a pressure build up you speak of. According to NASA things should steadily pick up leading up to a Solar maximum in the first quarter of 2013.



I'm at work just now, so sorry I can't back this up with evidence for now. will post more later.

cheers. g



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 11:25 PM
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2 'm' class flares in one day. Not bad.



this Sunspot - 1039 is about to come into our view on the near side of the sun too.

will be interesting if it keeps showing us this activity.




posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 11:37 PM
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I don't know your opinion on it, but if NASA can't be trusted on somethings they shouldn't be trusted on anything.

With that cleared up

I do agree that M class flares have happened before with little to no effect on the Earth. But I believe this is the beginning of a new solar cycle, and the most recent sunspot has been growing quite rapidly the past few days. To immediately assume this reaction is completely normal is rather ignorant I think. With all the recent uncommon activity on the Earth (Weather, EQ's, Volcanoes) is it really hard to imagine the Sun may be going through some "changes" as well?



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 11:59 PM
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reply to post by kyle43
 




I don't know your opinion on it, but if NASA can't be trusted on somethings they shouldn't be trusted on anything


I don't really enjoy getting into spats about NASA because I simly don't know enough to comment.

All I do know is, that because of NASA we are gathering awesome information about our Sun and we have never been able to see images or information quite like this before.



To immediately assume this reaction is completely normal is rather ignorant I think


Thats entirely up to you. Some may say it's ignorant for thinking it's not normal.



With all the recent uncommon activity on the Earth (Weather, EQ's, Volcanoes) is it really hard to imagine the Sun may be going through some "changes" as well?


No, it's not hard to imagine at all.



posted on Jan, 20 2010 @ 12:47 AM
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reply to post by kyle43
 

You are correct. This is the beginning of a new Solar cycle, number 24 to be precise. The current prediction (not from NASA but from a consortium of solar scientists) is that the cycle will peak in May of 2013 and will have a fewer than average sunspot number. We will see an increase in solar activity for the next few years. And yes, it is normal. While we have no way of knowing what to expect as far as intensity goes, there is no reason to expect anything particularly extreme.

I don't know about "uncommon activity" on Earth though (or how it would relate to the Sun). We've always had freaky weather. We've always had earthquakes. We've always had volcanoes. I've seen no indication that any of these things happening recently are any different in frequency or character than what we've seen in the past. Thanks to the internet we hear a lot more about them but statistically there really is no change.

[edit on 1/20/2010 by Phage]



posted on Jan, 20 2010 @ 01:14 AM
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I would agree that the current weather is "uncommon" for my lifetime thus far but its not unheard of either.

The earthquakes a more frequent that last year as far as how it started but you can pick many months that you saw a large increase and then a drop off. Overall the world is pretty constant but of course we can always see the extremes.

If something like Yellowstone blew up or a massive solar flare took out our grids. It wouldn't really be that uncommon of an event for the earths lifespan. It would actually be more odd to me if we didn't have a large earthquake like Yellowstone or a large solar flare in the next 100-200 years just because of how its gone in the past.



posted on Jan, 20 2010 @ 02:43 AM
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An update from SpaceWeather.com




Yesterday's M2-class solar flare bathed Earth's upper atmosphere in X-rays and caused a wave of ionization to sweep over Europe. This actually improved the propagation of low-frequency radio signals, which use the ionosphere as a reflector to skip over the horizon


Nice. I bet the HAM's were getting some nice skip during this.

.......I miss the days when I was calling out over the airwaves from Scotland.




[edit on 20-1-2010 by grantbeed]



posted on Jan, 20 2010 @ 01:38 PM
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reply to post by NWtoHide
 

Thanks guys for explaining this to me . The whole thread is good . Seems everything is possible today and they were the same possibilities yesterday .


I guess I'll know if we get a hard hit if my computer is melted on my desk one morning .



posted on Jan, 20 2010 @ 03:15 PM
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the Sunspot is still flaring away. 5 M Class flares in the last 48 hours.

wonder if we will get a biggie as it comes round to face us?



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